Cases reported "Abdominal Abscess"

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1/26. Pelvic abscess with fistula to the abdominal wall due to verrucous carcinoma.

    The case report of a 38-year-old woman with a pelvic abscess resulting from verrucous carcinoma of the uterine cervix is presented. This case is remarkable because the abscess formed a fistula through the anterior abdominal wall and because there was no visible lesion on the cervix. The patient underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy, left salpingectomy, fistulectomy, and removal of the abscess. diagnosis was made on pathologic examination of the extirpated specimen. Genital tract verrucous carcinoma and genitocutaneous fistulae are reviewed.
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2/26. Nephrobronchial fistula secondary to xantogranulomatous pyelonephritis.

    We report a case of staghorn nephrolithiasis that evolved into xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis with perinephric abscess, nephrobronchial fistula, and lung abscess. The patient was an intravenous drug abuser who tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus, without evidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. He presented with a 2-month history of untreated repeated episodes of left flank pain and hyperpyrexia. Treatment involved left nephrectomy, debridement of abscess, tube drainage, and intravenous antibiotics. The patient illustrates the need to consider untreated nephrolitiasis as a predisposing factor for pulmonary complications.
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3/26. Persistent wound infection after herniotomy associated with small-colony variants of staphylococcus aureus.

    A small-colony variant (SCV) of staphylococcus aureus was cultured from a patient with a persistent wound infection (abscess and fistula) 13 months after herniotomy. The strain was nonhemolytic, nonpigmented and grew only anaerobically on Schaedler agar. As it was coagulase-negative, it was initially misidentified as a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. In further analysis, however, the microorganism was shown to be an auxotroph that reverted to normal growth and morphology in the presence of menadione and hemin (Schaedler agar) and could be identified as a SCV of staphylococcus aureus. Surgery and antibiotic treatment of the patient with flucloxacillin and rifampicin for 4 weeks resulted in healing of the chronic wound infection.
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4/26. Erosion of an intraperitoneal chemotherapy catheter resulting in an enterovaginal fistula.

    BACKGROUND: With the pharmacokinetic advantages of intraperitoneal chemotherapy delivery and the increased popularity of immunotherapy and gene therapy, intraperitoneal catheters have moved to the forefront as a delivery system in cancer treatment. This delivery system, however, carries with it an intrinsic morbidity warranting attention in the often prolonged chemotherapy regimens demanded by cancer patients. CASE: In reviewing the literature of intraperitoneal catheter complications, there is no other cited case of a peritoneal catheter erosion into intestine presenting as an enterovaginal fistula. Our patient, diagnosed with persistent ovarian carcinoma, had a peritoneal Tenckoff catheter placed for chemotherapy. Many months after termination of the chemotherapy and 15 months after placement, she presented with bowel contents per vagina. A CT scan revealed an abdominopelvic abscess encompassing the detached catheter which embedded in the rectosigmoid colon, allowing direct communication to the upper vagina. The catheter was removed and the abscess was drained. CONCLUSION: Intraperitoneal catheters have a morbidity that persists after nonuse. Therefore, intraperitoneal catheters should be removed if they are not being used.
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5/26. Infected pancreatic pseudocysts with colonic fistula formation successfully managed by endoscopic drainage alone: report of two cases.

    Fistulization of pancreatic pseudocysts into surrounding viscera is a well-known phenomenon and usually requires surgical management. We report two cases of pancreatic pseudocysts that developed spontaneous fistulas to the colon with resulting fever and abdominal pain. The patients were managed nonoperatively with a combination of endoscopic drainage and antibiotics, and their pseudocysts and fistulas resolved. The patients have remained symptom-free for a mean of 14 months of follow-up.
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6/26. Late complication following percutaneous cholecystostomy: retained abdominal wall gallstone.

    A case of recurrent abdominal wall abscess following percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) is presented. Transperitoneal PC was performed in an 82-year-old female with calculous cholecystitis. Symptoms resolved and the catheter was removed 29 days later. The patient came back 5 months later with a superficial abscess that was drained and 8 months post PC with a fistula discharging clear fluid. ultrasonography revealed the tract adjacent to an area of inflammation containing a calculus, whereas CT failed to depict the stone. Subsequent surgery confirmed US findings. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a dislodged bile stone following percutaneous cholecystostomy.
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7/26. Timing of surgery for enterovesical fistula in Crohn's disease: decision analysis using a time-dependent compartment model.

    OBJECTIVES: Previous decision analyses of inflam matory bowel diseases (IBD) have used decision trees and markov chains. Occasionally IBD patients present with medical problems that are difficult or even impossible to phrase in terms of such established decision tools. This article aims to introduce modeling by a time-dependent compartment mode and demonstrate its feasibility for decision analysis in IBD methods: A Crohn's disease patient presented with a pelvic abscess and an enterovesical fistula. Being hesitant to operate in an acutely inflamed area, the surgeon recommended that the patient continue antibiotic therapy until the abscess had re solved. The gastroenterologist argued that the patient had already been treated with antibiotics for a prolonged time period and expressed concern that the patient's overall diminished health status would deteriorate by further delay of surgery. The occurrence of fistula, abscess, urinary tract infection, antibiotic therapy, surgical operation, and health-related quality of life were modeled as separate compartments, with time-dependent relationships among them. The simulation was carried out on an Excel spreadsheet. RESULTS: In the model, the surgeon's predictions were associated with rapid resolution of the pelvic abscess under antibiotic therapy and improvement of the patient's health status. The gastroenterologist's predictions resulted in a smaller decline in abscess size and further deterioration of the patient's health while waiting for a definitive treatment. The disagreement between surgery and gastroenterology arose from predicting different time courses for the individual disease events, in essence, from assigning different time constants to the time-dependent influences of the disease model. CONCLUSIONS: The compartment model provides a simple and generally applicable method to assess time dependent-changes of a complex disease. The present analysis also serves to illustrate the usefulness of such models in simulating disease behavior.
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8/26. Transverse colonic cancer presenting as an anterior abdominal wall abscess: report of a case.

    An 81-year-old man who had been aware of a right anterior abdominal mass for 1 week was admitted to our hospital on July 3, 1999, after the mass had perforated and was secreting mucinous purulent material. Computed tomography clearly showed an anterior abdominal wall abscess and a large intraabdominal tumor that contained a fistula-like structure. barium enema revealed an apple-core sign at the transverse colon, with a fistula that connected the colon to the abscess cavity. Transverse colonic cancer complicated by an anterior abdominal wall abscess was diagnosed, and an extended right hemicolectomy was performed. We did not perform en bloc excision of the full thickness of the anterior abdominal wall, including the abscess, because the defect was determined to be too large to repair. Thus, when curative resection is not feasible, as in our patient, resection of the primary tumor with en bloc partial resection of the adherent parietal wall should be performed if possible, as this procedure has the potential to improve the postoperative quality of life of the patient.
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9/26. Brief clinical report: duodenal laceration presenting as massive hematemesis and multiple intraabdominal abscesses after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    SUMMARY: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is considered the gold standard for gallstone disease. Nevertheless, possible severe complications must not be underestimated. Bowel injuries are uncommon, but they are one of the most lethal technical complications of laparoscopic surgery. These injuries were commonly unrecognized at the time of procedures and were diagnosed later when the patients experienced sepsis, peritonitis, intraabdominal abscess, or enterocutaneous fistula. Although duodenal lacerations have been reported with laparoscopic cholecystectomies, they seem to be rare; approximately 30 such cases have been documented previously in the English literature. We report the case of a patient with thermal duodenal injury caused by elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy at an outside center presenting as massive hematemesis and multiple intraabdominal abscesses on the ninth postoperative day. The diagnosis and management of this rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy are described, and the literature is reviewed.
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10/26. Retroperitoneal abscess after neurolytic celiac plexus block from the anterior approach.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The anterior approach for celiac plexus block has the potential risks of infection, hemorrhage, and fistula formation. We report a case of a patient who developed a retroperitoneal abscess with the formation of a vascular-enteric fistula after a neurolytic celiac plexus block from the anterior approach. CASE REPORT: A 60-year-old female with a history of pain secondary to chronic idiopathic calcifying pancreatitis (VAS 7-8) underwent a subtotal resection of the head of the pancreas with an end-to-side pancreatojejunostomy using a Roux-en-Y loop. Pain continued secondary to chronic pancreatitis. Because of intolerance (vomiting and constipation) of morphine and transdermal fentanyl over a 2-month period, it was decided to perform a neurolytic celiac plexus block using the anterior approach with ultrasound guidance. The patient's pain was completely relieved, enabling withdrawal of oral analgesics. Pain reappeared after 2 years, and the same technique was repeated. Ten days later, she was admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Computed tomography showed a left paravertebral retroperitoneal abscess; arteriography suggested a fistula between the mesenteric vein and the jejunum. Urgent surgery was undertaken, revealing a leak of the pancreatojejunostomy and a large abscess around the celiac plexus. A distal pancreatectomy and partial resection of the Roux-en-Y loop was performed. The patient was discharged 1 month later in good clinical condition. Because of recurrent pain, she has required repeated neurolytic celiac plexus blocks via a posterior approach without complications. CONCLUSION: The posterior approach for neurolytic celiac plexus block should be considered in particular in patients with previous pancreatic surgery.
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