Cases reported "Abdominal Abscess"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/44. Recurrent abdominal abscess secondary to a dropped laparoscopic clip: CT imaging.

    Since being introduced in 1987, laparoscopic cholecystectomy has quickly become the treatment of choice for symptomatic gallstone disease. Computed tomography is an excellent method to evaluate the laparoscopic patient in whom postoperative complication is suspected.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/44. The occurrence of an abdominal wall abscess 11 years after appendectomy: report of a case.

    Most complications after appendectomy occur within 10 days; however, we report herein the unusual case of a patient in whom a wound abscess was detected more than 10 years after an appendectomy. A 26-year-old woman presented to our hospital with nausea and vomiting, pain, and a mass in the right lower abdominal wall. She had undergone an appendectomy 11 years previously. physical examination revealed a tender mass, 5 cm in diameter, under the appendectomy scar. An abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated a low-echoic mass lesion measuring 9.0 x 5.0 x 2.0 cm. Incision of the connective tissue revealed about 3 ml of cream-colored and odorless fluid in the abscess cavity. Fistulography revealed an abscess cavity not communicating with the bowel lumen. Floss was discovered in the connective tissue and removed. debridement of the abscess wall was performed and a piece of the wall was sent for histologic examination. Pathological examination revealed panniculitis of the subcutaneous tissue, and panniculitis with granulation and granuloma of the abscess wall. This case report demonstrates that a preoperative diagnosis should be based not on one finding, but on all findings collected, inclusively.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/44. Retroperitoneal abscess and bacteremia due to mycoplasma hominis in a polytraumatized man.

    We report a case of a retroperitoneal abscess due to mycoplasma hominis in a young polytraumatized man who developed septicemia under treatment with rifampin and flucloxacillin. M. hominis was recovered from blood cultures as well as from the abscess near the left iliac spine. After 10 days of therapy with clindamycin the patient improved, and intraoperatively taken swabs were culture negative but still positive by PCR.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/44. Splenic abscess after appendicitis.

    We report an appendicitis complicated by a splenic abscess in a patient with polycystic kidneys and multiple cystic lesions in the liver. Clinical decision making for operative intervention was made difficult by the extensive intra-abdominal abnormalities seen on computer tomography. Finally curation was achieved by splenectomy and appendectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/44. Retroperitoneal teratoma presenting as acute abdomen in an elderly person.

    A 56-year-old man presented with acute abdomen. Clinically, he was diagnosed as having perigastric abscess. On exploration, a retroperitoneal cystic teratoma was encountered. Postoperatively, he recovered uneventfully and has no residual disease two years later.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/44. Infected pancreatic pseudocysts with colonic fistula formation successfully managed by endoscopic drainage alone: report of two cases.

    Fistulization of pancreatic pseudocysts into surrounding viscera is a well-known phenomenon and usually requires surgical management. We report two cases of pancreatic pseudocysts that developed spontaneous fistulas to the colon with resulting fever and abdominal pain. The patients were managed nonoperatively with a combination of endoscopic drainage and antibiotics, and their pseudocysts and fistulas resolved. The patients have remained symptom-free for a mean of 14 months of follow-up.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/44. Intraabdominal abscess managed successfully via the laparoscopic approach.

    A rare complication of laparoscopic fundoplication-an intraabdominal abscess located between the fundus and the caudate lobe of the liver-is described. A 41-year-old man had undergone a laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti fundoplication for longstanding gastroesophageal reflux disease. On the 5th postoperative day, the patient's general condition became worse, and he developed intermittent-remittent fever (40 degrees C), an elevated white blood cell count (WBC), and an accelerated sedimentation rate. Evidence of leakage was excluded by Gastrografin swallow. The diagnosis was finally revealed by means of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scan, which showed an intraabdominal fluid collection with an air cap of ~10 cm in diameter situated between the diaphragmatic crura, the caudate lobe of the liver, and the gastric fundus. The location did not allow semi-invasive management of the abscess, such as ultrasound or CT-guided puncture and drainage. On the 8th postoperative day, a laparoscopic exploration was performed utilizing the previous port sites. The adhesions were easily dissected, and evacuation of ~300 ml of white, dense fluid, and lavage and drainage were performed without intraabdominal dissemination of pus. The patient was discharged on the 12th postoperative day free of symptoms. Microbiological examination of the pus showed the presence of peptostreptococcus. The patient remained symptom free. At 8 weeks postoperatively, barium swallow, endoscopy, 24-h pH monitoring, and stationary manometry of the esophagus yielded normal results. Because there was no direct evidence of leakage at the fundus, the development of the abscess was concluded to be due to the use of deep transmucosal stitches rather than seromuscular ones to create the wrap. The nonabsorbable multifilament suture material passing through the entire gastric wall could have facilitated bacterial contamination of the operative field.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/44. Transverse colonic cancer presenting as an anterior abdominal wall abscess: report of a case.

    An 81-year-old man who had been aware of a right anterior abdominal mass for 1 week was admitted to our hospital on July 3, 1999, after the mass had perforated and was secreting mucinous purulent material. Computed tomography clearly showed an anterior abdominal wall abscess and a large intraabdominal tumor that contained a fistula-like structure. barium enema revealed an apple-core sign at the transverse colon, with a fistula that connected the colon to the abscess cavity. Transverse colonic cancer complicated by an anterior abdominal wall abscess was diagnosed, and an extended right hemicolectomy was performed. We did not perform en bloc excision of the full thickness of the anterior abdominal wall, including the abscess, because the defect was determined to be too large to repair. Thus, when curative resection is not feasible, as in our patient, resection of the primary tumor with en bloc partial resection of the adherent parietal wall should be performed if possible, as this procedure has the potential to improve the postoperative quality of life of the patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/44. Recurrent septic episodes following gallstone spillage at laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    A 51-year-old woman underwent emergency laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Stone loss occurred during gallbladder dissection. histology showed empyema of the gallbladder. Postoperatively, she developed a subhepatic abscess that required percutaneous drainage. Two years after surgery, she re-presented with a right paracolic abscess. Transsciatic CT-guided drainage of the abscess was performed. barium enema excluded colonic pathology. Two weeks later, she developed a right gluteal abscess deep to the recent drain site. Ultrasound-guided drainage was performed followed by a sonogram. The sonogram ruled out communication with the peritoneum. Two further subhepatic abscesses occurred during the next 5 years; the first abscess was drained percutaneously, but the second required open drainage: At laparotomy, gallstone fragments were found within the abscess cavity. The site of the previous gluteal drain continued to discharge intermittently. An MRI scan showed an uncomplicated sinus track. Subsequent sinography of the right gluteal track demonstrated an opacity at the apex of the sinus. The sinus was laid open and a gallstone retrieved. The patient has remained well for 3 years. Complications due to gallstone spillage generally manifest themselves shortly after surgery. This case demonstrates that lost stones may cause chronic abdominal and abdominal wall sepsis. In cases of chronic abdominal sepsis after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the possibility of lost stones should be considered even if stones are not positively shown on imaging.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/44. abdominal wall abscess secondary to spilled gallstones: late complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and preventive measures.

    Spilled gallstones left in the abdominal cavity or trapped at trocar sites may cause considerable morbidity. We saw a patient with an abdominal wall abscess 2 years after laparoscopic cholecystectomy secondary to spilled stones. After we reviewed the operative procedure in addition to the accumulated experience in laparoscopic surgery, we believe that retrieval of specimens and their contents is of paramount importance, especially when the gallbladder is infected, contains several stones, or may harbor malignancy. Therefore, we made use of a simple surgical glove with a long pursestring suture surrounding the opening to collect the specimen. This method proved to be simple and quite convenient, with the needed materials readily available. It can collect the spilled stones within the abdominal cavity as well as the gallbladder and can transport these stones out of the abdominal cavity with ease and safety. It also protects the specimen in contact with the wound and cuts short the operating time. The technique and advantages are described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Abdominal Abscess'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.