Cases reported "Abdominal Abscess"

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1/9. The occurrence of an abdominal wall abscess 11 years after appendectomy: report of a case.

    Most complications after appendectomy occur within 10 days; however, we report herein the unusual case of a patient in whom a wound abscess was detected more than 10 years after an appendectomy. A 26-year-old woman presented to our hospital with nausea and vomiting, pain, and a mass in the right lower abdominal wall. She had undergone an appendectomy 11 years previously. physical examination revealed a tender mass, 5 cm in diameter, under the appendectomy scar. An abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated a low-echoic mass lesion measuring 9.0 x 5.0 x 2.0 cm. Incision of the connective tissue revealed about 3 ml of cream-colored and odorless fluid in the abscess cavity. Fistulography revealed an abscess cavity not communicating with the bowel lumen. Floss was discovered in the connective tissue and removed. debridement of the abscess wall was performed and a piece of the wall was sent for histologic examination. Pathological examination revealed panniculitis of the subcutaneous tissue, and panniculitis with granulation and granuloma of the abscess wall. This case report demonstrates that a preoperative diagnosis should be based not on one finding, but on all findings collected, inclusively.
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keywords = wound
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2/9. Persistent wound infection after herniotomy associated with small-colony variants of staphylococcus aureus.

    A small-colony variant (SCV) of staphylococcus aureus was cultured from a patient with a persistent wound infection (abscess and fistula) 13 months after herniotomy. The strain was nonhemolytic, nonpigmented and grew only anaerobically on Schaedler agar. As it was coagulase-negative, it was initially misidentified as a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. In further analysis, however, the microorganism was shown to be an auxotroph that reverted to normal growth and morphology in the presence of menadione and hemin (Schaedler agar) and could be identified as a SCV of staphylococcus aureus. Surgery and antibiotic treatment of the patient with flucloxacillin and rifampicin for 4 weeks resulted in healing of the chronic wound infection.
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ranking = 449.44656472293
keywords = wound infection, wound
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3/9. abdominal wall abscess secondary to spilled gallstones: late complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and preventive measures.

    Spilled gallstones left in the abdominal cavity or trapped at trocar sites may cause considerable morbidity. We saw a patient with an abdominal wall abscess 2 years after laparoscopic cholecystectomy secondary to spilled stones. After we reviewed the operative procedure in addition to the accumulated experience in laparoscopic surgery, we believe that retrieval of specimens and their contents is of paramount importance, especially when the gallbladder is infected, contains several stones, or may harbor malignancy. Therefore, we made use of a simple surgical glove with a long pursestring suture surrounding the opening to collect the specimen. This method proved to be simple and quite convenient, with the needed materials readily available. It can collect the spilled stones within the abdominal cavity as well as the gallbladder and can transport these stones out of the abdominal cavity with ease and safety. It also protects the specimen in contact with the wound and cuts short the operating time. The technique and advantages are described.
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keywords = wound
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4/9. abdominal wall sinus due to impacting gallstone during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: an unusual complication.

    During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, perforation of the gallbladder can occurs in < or = 20% of cases, while gallstone spillage occurs in < or = 6% of cases. In most cases, there are no consequences. gallstones can be lost in the abdominal wall as well as the abdomen during extraction of the gallbladder. The fate of such lost gallstones, which can lead to the formation of an abscess, an abdominal wall mass, or a persistent sinus, has not been studied adequately. Herein we report the case of a persistent sinus of the abdominal wall after an emergent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an 82-year-old woman with gangrenous cholecystitis and perforation of the friable wall in association with an empyema of the gallbladder. The culture of the obtained pus was positive for escherichia coli. After a small leak of dirty fluid from the wound of the epigastric port site of 4 months' duration, surgical exploration under local anesthesia revealed that the sinus was caused by spilled gallstones impacting into the abdominal wall between the posterior sheath and left rectus abdominalis muscle. The removal of the stones resulted in complete healing. Long-term complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy involving the abdominal wall are rare but important possible consequences that could be avoided.
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keywords = wound
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5/9. Lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm in traumatic spinal cord injury: a case report.

    Lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare vascular complication of trauma. This case report concerns a 24-year-old man with a lumbar-level spinal cord injury (SCI) secondary to a gunshot wound who developed severe exacerbation of low back and flank pain during inpatient rehabilitation. Diagnostic investigations at an acute care hospital revealed a left lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm. This was treated by transcatheter embolization, which resulted in a marked reduction in pain. The patient resumed inpatient rehabilitation without further complications. This case report highlights the importance of early diagnosis of lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm, a potentially fatal complication that can occur in patients with traumatic lumbosacral SCI. Physiatrists should include lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm in the differential diagnosis for back, flank, or abdominal pain in this patient population.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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6/9. Effective laparoscopic drainage for intra-abdominal abscess not amenable to percutaneous approach: report of two cases.

    PURPOSE: The usefulness of the laparoscopic approach for massive intra-abdominal abscesses is controversial. We report two patients who underwent laparoscopic abscess drainage for massive intra-abdominal abscesses not amenable to the percutaneous approach that were suspected to be caused by acute appendicitis. methods: In both patients, four ports were placed at their abdominal walls under general anesthesia. Intra-abdominal abscess cavities were punched out, and the purulent exudates that spilled out from the cavities were aspirated completely. Copious irrigation was performed under direct vision. These procedures were completed laparoscopically. RESULTS: The postoperative clinical courses of the patients were uneventful. The intra-abdominal abscesses did not recur, and no wound complications were recognized. The patients were discharged from our hospital in excellent condition within two weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic drainage for massive intra-abdominal abscess is a minimally invasive and useful procedure compared with the open method or the percutaneous approach. It offers the advantage of being able to explore of the abdominal cavity without an unnecessary wide incision, and aspiration of a purulent exudate is possible under direct vision.
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keywords = wound
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7/9. ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection due to serratia marcescens.

    serratia marcescens is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacillus that is most often associated with infections of the respiratory tract, urinary tract, wounds, and bloodstream. Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) with this pathogen are exceedingly infrequent. Even more rare is the association of S. marcescens with infections of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. To the best of our knowledge, we describe in this report not only the first case of a VP shunt infection by S. marcescens in an adult, but also the first case of a VP shunt infection by this organism in the absence of bowel perforation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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8/9. Chronic abdominal wall sinus and recurrent abscesses caused by a foreign body after laparotomy.

    The prolonged failure of a wound to heal due to the existence of a foreign body can result in chronic sinuses and fistulae and is a situation that should be avoided through thorough assessment of the wound in the first instance.
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ranking = 2
keywords = wound
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9/9. Use of magnet therapy to heal an abdominal wound: a case study.

    complementary therapies, in particular magnet therapy, may have benefits to offer in healing chronic wounds. This case study involves a 51 year old paraplegic woman with an abdominal wound that had been present for one year. Traditional approaches to wound care had not achieved complete healing. Prior to surgical intervention, the patient consented to the application of magnet therapy over her usual wound dressing. In one month, the wound completely healed. On the basis of this case, further investigation of magnet therapy for wound healing appears to be warranted.
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ranking = 10
keywords = wound
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