Cases reported "Abdominal Injuries"

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1/87. Reconstruction of disruption of the abdominal wall in burn patients.

    Two patients with extensive destruction of the full thickness of the abdominal wall and associated intra-abdominal injuries were encountered. One case resulted from burns to a patient pinned under an automobile in contact with the muffler; the other was injured as a result of penetration of the abdominal wall by a railroad coupling and was also burned in an associated welding accident at the same time. Extensive staged debridement and repair of intra-abdominal injuries in several procedures were required in case 1. Closure was eventually achieved with serial applications of mesh and split-thickness autografting. In case 2, an initial attempt at flap closure failed. Coverage initially was obtained with silicone mesh followed by split-thickness grafting. We report successful management of two of these difficult reconstructive challenges.
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keywords = intra-abdominal
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2/87. Perforation of the colon after blunt trauma.

    Blunt rupture of the colon follows a direct blow to the abdomen. Physical findings suggesting peritoneal irritation are usually present early in the postinjury period and lead to further evaluation and operation. In unresponsive patients, physical findings may be masked, diagnosis delayed, and outcome compromised. Perioperative antibiotics and early celiotomy with complete intra-abdominal exploration and primary repair of the colon injury usually provide excellent results.
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keywords = intra-abdominal
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3/87. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for trauma?

    We report a case of successful emergency TIPS placement to control intra-abdominal bleeding after blunt abdominal trauma in a patient with severe cirrhosis and portal hypertension.
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keywords = intra-abdominal
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4/87. Splenic abscess following blunt abdominal trauma.

    A rare case of splenic abscess occurring after blunt abdominal trauma in a previously healthy boy is reported. The diagnosis was made by ultrasonography. The patient recovered after splenectomy and drainage of subphrenic and intraperitoneal pus.
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ranking = 0.029455975219644
keywords = abscess
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5/87. Combined blunt thoracic aortic and abdominal trauma: diagnostic and treatment priorities.

    Combined blunt trauma to the thoracic aorta and abdomen challenges the surgeon from a diagnostic and therapeutic standpoint. Appropriately prioritizing diagnostic workup and treatment is critical to assuring patient survival. A management approach that considers the patient's injuries and clinical condition as well as the availability of aortography and cardiac surgery are essential. patients with blunt aortic injury who are hemodynamically unstable with signs of intra-abdominal injury should have immediate abdominal exploration. Further assessment of the aortic injury and surgical repair can be delayed until after the critical intra-abdominal bleeding has been addressed. The stable patient who has both blunt abdominal trauma and blunt thoracic aortic injury but has no signs of ongoing abdominal hemorrhage should initially have arch aortography. Additional abdominal diagnostic studies may be done but should not delay indicated surgical repair of the aortic injury.
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ranking = 1
keywords = intra-abdominal
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6/87. Serial bedside emergency ultrasound in a case of pediatric blunt abdominal trauma with severe abdominal pain.

    We present a case of a teenager with isolated left renal laceration with perirenal hematoma. The patient had presented with severe left upper quadrant (LUQ) pain following blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) sustained during a sledding accident. A screening bedside focused abdominal sonogram for trauma (FAST) rapidly excluded free fluid on two serial examinations, 30 minutes apart. It provided the pediatric emergency physician with a measure of diagnostic confidence that the patient could be safely transported to the CT suite for detailed delineation of his injury. Moreover, narcotic analgesia was liberally administered early in his illness course, without the fear of unmasking potential hypovolemia when it was known that he did not have gross intra-abdominal bleeding on his bedside ultrasound (US). It also provided a working diagnosis of the primary organ of injury. Our hospital, like many pediatric hospitals around the nation, does not have in-house 24-hour radiology support. We suggest that the use of the bedside US be extended to the stable pediatric patient in severe abdominal pain following BAT. It can serve as a valuable, rapid, noninvasive, bedside, easily repeated, fairly accurate triage tool to evaluate pediatric BAT with severe pain.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = intra-abdominal
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7/87. Chronic intermittent intestinal obstruction from a seat belt injury.

    Most patients with intestinal obstruction have had previous surgery. Rarely, the development of adhesions and resulting small bowel obstruction is attributed to previous intra-abdominal trauma. We present the case of a young man, without a history of surgery, who had been a restrained driver in a motor vehicle crash. Seven years later, the patient had an intermittent partial small bowel obstruction that recurred over the next 5 years. We review the pathophysiology and epidemiology of similar occurrences, as well as diagnostic options.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = intra-abdominal
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8/87. Posttraumatic pseudocyst of the greater omentum: report of a case.

    Posttraumatic intra-abdominal cysts generally develop in relation to solid abdominal organs and most originate as a result of the organization of fluid or blood collection after trauma. They lack true endothelial lining and are hence called "pseudocysts." We report herein the rare case of a traumatic pseudocyst of the greater omentum in a 6-year-old child who was successfully treated by laparotomy and excision of the cyst.
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keywords = intra-abdominal
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9/87. abdominal pain in a child after blunt abdominal trauma: an unusual injury.

    We report a case of perforation of a walled off appendiceal abscess in a 5-year-old boy who sustained blunt abdominal trauma. The past medical history was significant only for a 4-day episode of abdominal pain 1 month prior to this presentation. Initial laboratory studies were unremarkable, and radiographic studies showed free fluid in the pelvis with no evidence of solid organ injury, but inflammation of the right colon. The final diagnosis was made at laparotomy. We emphasize this unique presentation and review the literature on traumatic appendicitis in children.
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ranking = 0.0058911950439287
keywords = abscess
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10/87. Seat belt syndrome in children: a case report and review of the literature.

    Characteristic patterns of injury to children in automobile crashes resulting from lap and lap-shoulder belts have been described for many years. These injuries are known as the "seat belt syndrome." We present a typical case of seat belt syndrome involving a 4-year-old boy and review the current literature on the topic, highlighting proposed mechanisms of intra-abdominal and spine injuries. In addition, recent research findings identifying a new pattern of injuries associated with inappropriate seat belt use in young children are reviewed. Emergency physicians must consider these seat belt-related injuries in the initial evaluation of any child involved in a motor vehicle crash who was restrained with the vehicle seat belt.
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keywords = intra-abdominal
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