Cases reported "Abdominal Injuries"

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11/87. Hydroblast intra-abdominal organ trauma.

    Hydroblast injuries of the extremities are not uncommon. Hydroblast injuries involving intra-abdominal organs are more unusual. Usually there are subtle findings on the abdominal wall with severe intra-abdominal trauma and undue delay in appropriate treatment may occur, resulting in increased morbidity. In addition to a review of the literature, this article presents a case of intestinal perforation due to hydroblast trauma.
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keywords = intra-abdominal
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12/87. Management of hemobilia with transarterial angiographic embolization: report of one case.

    A nine-year-old girl who developed life threatening hemobilia after blunt abdominal trauma was successfully managed by embolization of the hepatic artery aneurysm. However, biliary fistula persisted and subcapsular liver abscess occurred after the endoscopic sphincterotomy and the placement of a nasobiliary drain for bile leakage. debridement of the abscess and insertion of a drain tube eventually cured the event. The relevant literature is reviewed and the management of the hemobilia is discussed.
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ranking = 0.0039274633626191
keywords = abscess
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13/87. Portal-venous gas unrelated to mesenteric ischemia.

    The aim of this study was to report on 8 patients with all different non-ischemic etiologies for portal-venous gas and to discuss this rare entity and its potentially misleading CT findings in context with a review of the literature. The CT examinations of eight patients who presented with intrahepatic portal-venous gas, unrelated to bowel ischemia or infarction, were reviewed and compared with their medical records with special emphasis on the pathogenesis and clinical impact of portal-venous gas caused by non-ischemic conditions. The etiologies for portal-venous gas included: abdominal trauma ( n=1); large gastric cancer ( n=1); prior gastroscopic biopsy ( n=1); prior hemicolectomy ( n=1); graft-vs-host reaction ( n=1); large paracolic abscess ( n=1); mesenteric recurrence of ovarian cancer superinfected with clostridium septicum ( n=1); and sepsis with pseudomonas aeruginosa ( n=1). The clinical outcome of all patients was determined by their underlying disease and not negatively influenced by the presence of portal-venous gas. Although the presence of portal-venous gas usually raises the suspicion of bowel ischemia and/or intestinal necrosis, this CT finding may be related to a variety of non-ischemic etiologies and pathogeneses as well. The knowledge about these conditions may help to avoid misinterpretation of CT findings, inappropriate clinical uncertainty and unnecessary surgery in certain cases.
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ranking = 0.0019637316813096
keywords = abscess
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14/87. Hepatic portal venous gas caused by blunt abdominal trauma: is it a true ominous sign of bowel necrosis? Report of a case.

    A case of transient portal venous gas in the liver following blunt abdominal trauma is described. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated hepatic portal venous gas 4 h after the injury. An exploratory laparotomy revealed segmental necrosis of the small intestine with a rupture of the bladder. Pneumatosis intestinalis was evident on the resected bowel. A histopathologic study revealed congestion and bleeding in the bowel wall and a great deal of the mucosa had been lost because of necrosis. However, neither thrombus nor atherosclerotic changes were observed in the vessels. A bacteriological examination demonstrated anaerobic bacteria from the bowel mucosa, which was most likely to produce portal venous gas. Although the present case was associated with bowel necrosis, a review of literature demonstrated that portal venous gas does not necessarily indicate bowel necrosis in trauma patients. There is another possibility that the portal venous gas was caused by a sudden increase in the intra-abdominal pressure with concomitant mucosal disruption, which thus forced intraluminal gas into the portal circulation in the blunt trauma patients.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = intra-abdominal
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15/87. A patient with liver trauma and incomplete behcet s disease.

    Behcet' s disease (BD ) is a complex multisystemic disease, which is characterized by recurrent oral and genital aphteous ulcers and iritis in which vasculitis can also be one of the possible clinical manifestations. A thirty seven year-old female patient with incomplete BD was admitted to emergency service, with intra-abdominal hemorrhage more severe than that would be expected, with the degree of related trauma. We decided to manage the patient conservatively, observing vital signs, haemogram, computed tomography (CT) and angiography instead. Subcapsular hematomas were detected in the right and left lobes of the liver. No data was encountered in the literature and textbooks referring to liver trauma with BD, except a case of fatal hemobilia. H ere in we present a liver trauma case with hemorrhage and hepatic fragility due to vasculitis in Behcet' s disease and review the literature. Key words: liver trauma, incomplete Behcet' s disease
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = intra-abdominal
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16/87. Sonographic diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture.

    gallbladder injuries after blunt abdominal trauma are rare and often follow a vague and insidious clinical course. Consequently, gallbladder injuries commonly go undiagnosed until exploratory laparotomy. early diagnosis is essential, because trauma to the gallbladder is typically treated surgically, and delay in treatment can result in considerable mortality and morbidity. With sonography emerging as a first-line modality for evaluation of intra-abdominal trauma, sonographers may wish to become more familiar with the appearance of gallbladder injury on sonography to facilitate earlier diagnosis and to improve treatment and prognosis. We report a case of gallbladder perforation after blunt abdominal trauma diagnosed on the basis of computed tomography (CT) and sonography.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = intra-abdominal
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17/87. Cystic tumors of the pancreas. Considerations upon 34 operated cases.

    AIM: To point out the morphologic, clinic and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cystic tumors. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 34 pancreatic cystic tumors (21 males and 13 females, aged between 21 and 68 years), admitted in the last 15 years were analyzed. They were true cysts in 3 cases (9.9%) and pseudocysts in 31 cases (91.1%), located on the head of the pancreas in 8 cases, on the body in 19, on the tail in 6 and on the body and tail in 1 case. We noticed in the past medical history of the patients with pseudocysts a recent acute pancreatitis attack (26 cases), chronic pancreatitis (4 cases) or a recent abdominal trauma (1 case). The delay between the acute pancreatitis attack and the onset of the pseudocyst varied between 18 days and 2 months. The diagnosis was established by clinical picture (Shefer-Silvis triad), laboratory findings and imaging tests (barium meals, ultrasound test and/or CT test). Thirty cases (27 pseudocysts and 3 true cystic tumors) were operated on: the main surgical procedures were cystogastrostomy (12 cases), cystojejunostomy (6 cases) or cystoduodenostomy (3 cases); we also performed distal pancreatectomy (3 cases), laparostomy or external drainage in 5 cases. RESULTS: We registered 1 death (mortality rate of 3.3%), 2 pancreatic fistulae, 1 pancreatic abscess and 2 recurrences. CONCLUSIONS: 1. The pseudocyst, as an evolutionary complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis, is the most frequent cystic tumor of the pancreas, true pancreatic cysts being extremely rare. 2. The diagnosis is established by clinical pictures, laboratory findings and imaging tests. 3. The treatment is surgical, cystogastrostomy or cystojejunostomy being the main surgical procedures.
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ranking = 0.0019637316813096
keywords = abscess
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18/87. Management of traumatic abdominal wall hernia.

    Traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH) can occur after blunt trauma and can be classified into low- or high-energy injuries. Low energy injuries occur after impact on a small blunt object. High-energy injuries are sustained during motor vehicle accidents or automobile versus pedestrian accidents. We present six cases of high-energy TAWH cases that were treated at our trauma center. All patients presented with varying degrees of abdominal tenderness with either abdominal skin ecchymosis or abrasions, which made physical examination difficult. CT scan confirmed the hernia in each patient. All six patients had associated injuries that required open repair. The abdominal wall defects were repaired primarily. Three patients (50%) in our series developed a postoperative wound infection or abscess. review of the literature on low-energy TAWH shows no associated abdominal injuries. In conclusion distinction between low- and high-energy injury is imperative in the management of TAWH. Hernias following low-energy injuries can be repaired after local exploration through an incision overlying the defect. TAWHs following high-energy trauma should undergo exploratory laparotomy through a midline incision. The defect should be repaired primarily and prosthetics avoided because of the high incidence of postoperative infection.
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ranking = 0.0019637316813096
keywords = abscess
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19/87. Serial abdominal closure technique (the "SAC" procedure): a novel method for delayed closure of the abdominal wall.

    Abdominal compartment syndrome may occur after any elective or emergent abdominal operations that are complicated by postoperative hemorrhage or in the trauma patient who has massive fluid replacement for intra-abdominal bleeding. Once the abdomen is decompressed the type of closure varies as much as the surgeon performing the procedure. We have devised a simple, reproducible, inexpensive, and safe method to close the abdomen at the bedside. Serial abdominal closure (SAC) was performed on three patients 45, 54, and 14 years of age who had developed abdominal compartment syndrome secondary to an upper gastrointestinal bleed requiring massive transfusion, a tear of the superior mesenteric vein, and a grade 4 liver laceration respectively, all necessitating abdominal decompression. All three patients had their abdominal wounds closed at the bedside over the course of several days with our SAC technique. Subsequent postoperative course was uneventful and the abdominal wall was free of defects at one-year follow-up. SAC is an efficient, inexpensive, and easily reproducible method of managing the open abdomen. The use of SAC prevented abdominal closure-related complications such as enteric fistula and hernia formation in our three patients.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = intra-abdominal
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20/87. Post-traumatic intestinal obstruction.

    The roentgenographic and pathologic findings in three patients with delayed post-traumatic intestinal obstruction are described. The pertinent literature also is reviewed to delineate the variable pathophysiology of the clinical phenomenon. As a result of the increasing incidence of blunt trauma in our society, the problem of occult intra-abdominal injury resulting in subsequent clinical disease always should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting later with intestinal complaints. Once considered, routine roentgenologic evaluation usually is diagnostic, and arteriographic evaluation should be considered if the diagnosis is strongly suspected in the face of normal contrast studies. If intestinal obstruction is diagnosed, operative treatment is indicated, simple, and effective.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = intra-abdominal
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