Cases reported "Abdominal Injuries"

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1/146. Surgical resection of traumatic spleen cysts by laparoscopy.

    Surgical resection of traumatic cysts by means of laparoscopy in two female patients is reported. The patients had sustained severe trauma in the left upper quadrant, were symptomatic and developed large splenic cysts found by computerized tomography, with an average diameter of 8.5 cm. Both patients were submitted to puncture and capsule removal by means of videolaparoscopy and diathermy; splenic parenchyma was preserved and the cyst's bed drained. No intra or postoperative complications occurred. After an average 21 months postoperative follow-up, both patients are symptom-free and no late recurrences were found on tomographic studies. The advantages of this technique over others that have been reported are the preservation of splenic parenchyma, its easy performance and efficient relief of symptoms, as well as being minimally invasive, associated with minimal postoperative pain, shorter length of hospital stay, and no early recurrences.
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2/146. splenosis presenting as an ulcerated gastric mass: endoscopic and endoscopic ultrasonographic imaging.

    A case of an ulcerated gastric wall mass ultimately found to be splenosis is presented in which the index patient had endoscopic and endoscopic ultrasonographic evaluation prior to resection. Although no visual features identified this mass as a splenic implant preoperatively, the lesion appeared to be atypical for leiomyoma, which led to surgical intervention. The role of endoscopic ultrasonography in assessing isolated gastric masses is discussed.
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3/146. An unusual cause of haemorrhagic ascites following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Slow intraperitoneal haemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma may present as haemorrhagic ascites. Such haemorrhage is usually due to rupture of spleen, liver or damage to small bowel mesenteric vasculature. We encountered a patient with bleeding from ruptured exogastric leiomyoblastoma. Two cases of traumatic rupture of gastric leiomyosarcomas have been reported previously. The operative treatment is usually delayed and the diagnosis established only at laparotomy. We suggest a high level of suspicion and early laparotomy.
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4/146. Severe jaundice in a gunshot casualty due to the coexistence of Dubin-Johnson and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    We report an unusual case of a 21-year-old man who was shot in his abdomen in the course of a robbery. He was previously diagnosed as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient. Mild icterus was noticed on admission to the emergency room. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a perforated ileal loop that was resected, and because the liver color was greenish black, a liver biopsy was performed during the operation. After operation the patient went through a severe icteric state that resolved spontaneously within a few days. Urinary coproporphyrin levels, along with compatible liver biopsy, confirmed the diagnosis of Dubin-Johnson disease. Severe hyperbilirubinemia after an abdominal injury is uncommon and is usually due to either a biliary duct injury or iatrogenic injury. This case presents an unusual cause of severe postoperative jaundice due to the rare coexistence of two inherited disorders.
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5/146. An unusual bile duct injury in a child after blunt abdominal trauma.

    bile duct injuries are rare in children after blunt trauma. This report describes a 3-year-old child who sustained a blunt abdominal trauma resulting in bile duct, liver, and small bowel injuries. The initial management at another hospital included recognition and repair of a small bowel perforation. However, the postoperative course was complicated by a large biliary leak. The child was transferred to our institution where radioisotope scanning and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography confirmed the extent of the ductal injury. At laparotomy there were injuries of both right and left hepatic ducts, and an anomaly of bile duct course was noted. The right hepatic duct was repaired primarily and the left one was repaired with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. Postoperatively, normal bile drainage was documented by radioisotope scan and the patient remains symptom free at 1 year follow-up.
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6/146. Unilateral osseous bridging between the arches of atlas and axis after trauma.

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a case report. OBJECTIVE: To present a case of osseous bridging between C1 and C2 of posttraumatic origin and with an associated closed head injury and to discuss its pathogenesis and clinical outcome after surgical resection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Heterotopic ossifications of posttraumatic origin in the spine are rare. To the authors' knowledge, no cases have been reported of spontaneous bony bridging between C1 and C2 with a posttraumatic origin. methods: Heterotopic ossifications were detected when pain and limited axial rotation (left/right 10 degrees/0 degree/20 degrees) were persistent, despite intensive physical therapy. Because heterotopic ossifications were ankylosing C1 and C2, the decision was to resect the osseous bridge in combination with a careful mobilization of the cervical spine. Functional computed tomography was performed for analysis of the postoperative results. RESULTS: Four months after surgery, clinical examination showed asymptomatic increased axial rotation. Functional computed tomography indicated that left C1-C2 axial rotation was reduced, possibly related to impingement caused by residual bony spurs. Pathologic changes in the surrounding soft tissue may be another important factor in the persistent limitation of rotation. CONCLUSIONS: Osseous bridging between C1 and C2 may be considered when persistent pain and limited axial rotation are observed after trauma. Operative resection, together with careful intraoperative and postoperative mobilization, may be the treatment of choice.
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7/146. Complete biliary avulsion from blunt compression injury.

    The liver is the solid organ most commonly injured as a result of blunt abdominal trauma. Complete avulsion of the common hepatic duct is a rare and devastating type of hepatobiliary trauma. Here the authors report the case of a 7-year-old child who had complete biliary disruption as a result of an abdominal crush injury that was not diagnosed correctly preoperatively. The intraoperative diagnosis and treatment of this injury is discussed.
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8/146. Perforation of the colon after blunt trauma.

    Blunt rupture of the colon follows a direct blow to the abdomen. Physical findings suggesting peritoneal irritation are usually present early in the postinjury period and lead to further evaluation and operation. In unresponsive patients, physical findings may be masked, diagnosis delayed, and outcome compromised. Perioperative antibiotics and early celiotomy with complete intra-abdominal exploration and primary repair of the colon injury usually provide excellent results.
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9/146. Cricketing injuries in children: from the trivial to the severe.

    AIM: To describe the nature of acute cricketing injuries in children presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary level children's hospital. Two cases of severe injuries during a cricket game are reported. METHOD: A retrospective review of presentations to the emergency department from 1993 to April 1998. RESULTS: Sixty cases of cricketing injuries were reviewed. Injuries to the head, hands and forearms were most common. Most injuries were caused by being hit by a ball. A high proportion of cases required operative intervention. length of stay in hospital was only overnight in most cases. The two case reports highlight unusual but severe injuries that caused significant morbidity to the patients involved. CONCLUSION: Although cricket is, by and large, a safe sport, this report will raise awareness of the variety of injuries that can be suffered by children playing the game.
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10/146. Conservative management of hepatic duct injury after blunt trauma: a case report.

    Nonoperative management of solid organ injury in children with blunt abdominal trauma represents the standard of care. In rare cases, a major duct injury with persistent bile leakage may result from blunt trauma to the liver. This injury is of concern in patients treated nonoperatively because it generally must be treated with major abdominal surgery. The authors describe a case of hepatic duct injury from blunt trauma in which healing occurred without surgical repair or resection.
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