Cases reported "Abscess"

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1/10. trichomonas vaginalis in a perinephric abscess. A case report.

    A patient with chronic vulvo-vaginitis due to trichomonas vaginalis, and obstructive uropathy associated with renal calculi, developed a perinephric abscess following trauma incurred in a motorcycle accident. T. vaginalis was seen on smear and cultured from the purulent drainage from the perinephric abscess. Although T. vaginalis is commonly pathogenic only to the lower genito-urinary system, the upper urinary tract may very rarely be involved by ascending infection. If this protozoan spreads to extraluminal sites the inflammatory potential is marked, as has been found in animals with experimental infection. Examination of a fresh smear of pus may be critically important in the diagnosis of closed-space infections of unknown etiology.
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2/10. Pasteurella canis osteomyelitis and cutaneous abscess after a domestic dog bite.

    The genus Pasteurella is part of the normal oral flora of many animals, including domestic cats and dogs. In humans, Pasteurella may cause complications ranging from cellulitis to septicemia but rarely causes osteomyelitis or septic arthritis after bites and/or scratches by cats and dogs. Although pasteurella multocida is a common cause of infection, other Pasteurella species have also been cultured from wounds in humans. We describe here, a case of a cutaneous abscess and acute osteomyelitis associated with P canis after a domestic dog bite. To our knowledge, no previous case of P canis has been reported as the cause of acute osteomyelitis in humans.
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3/10. Severe pasteurella multocida infections in pregnant women.

    We report 2 cases of severe infections due to pasteurella multocida, both occurring during pregnancy in previously healthy women. Both women had contact with animals (dog and cat) but neither of them had been bitten. Apart from a slight decrease in IgG levels, no immunological defects could be detected. Both women had received oral phenoxymethylpenicillin in the early phase of the disease, but still fell ill with severe infections. One woman had meningitis while the other suffered from cellulitis with deep abscess formation.
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4/10. Community-acquired vancomycin-resistant enterococcus faecium: a case report from malaysia.

    vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are formidable organisms renowned for their ability to cause infections with limited treatment options and their potential for transferring resistance genes to other gram-positive bacteria. Usually associated with nosocomial infections, VRE are rarely reported as a cause of community-acquired infection. Presented here is a case of community-acquired infection due to vancomycin-resistant enterococcus faecium. The patient had been applying herbal leaves topically to his cheek to treat a buccal space abscess, resulting in a burn of the overlying skin. From pus aspirated via the skin a pure culture of E. faecium was grown that was resistant to vancomycin with a MIC of >256 microg ml-1 by the E test and resistant to teicoplanin by disc diffusion, consistent with the VanA phenotype. The organism was suspected of contaminating the leaf and infecting the patient via the burnt skin. This case highlights the need for further studies on the community prevalence of VRE among humans and animals to define unrecognized silent reservoirs for VRE, which may pose a threat to public health.
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5/10. catalase-negative listeria monocytogenes causing meningitis in an adult. Clinical and laboratory features.

    A 63-year-old previously healthy woman presented with acute meningitis. Cultures of the cerebrospinal fluid yielded a serotype 1/2a isolate of listeria monocytogenes that was biochemically typical in all respects, other than the reproducible lack of catalase production. During therapy, the patient developed oculomotor dysfunction that was attributed to an abscess in the internal capsule. This case report documents the existence of catalase-negative L. monocytogenes indicating that catalase production should not be a strict criterion for identification of Listeria. Furthermore, this clinical experience extends in vitro and experimental animal studies indicating that catalase production is not a necessary virulence factor for invasion by Listeria.
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6/10. pasteurella multocida infections. Report of 34 cases and review of the literature.

    pasteurella multocida, a small, gram-negative coccobacillus , is part of the normal oral flora of many animals, including the dog and cat. P. multocida is the etiologic agent in a variety of infectious disease syndromes. We have reported 34 cases of infection caused by P. multocida and have reviewed the English literature. P. multocida infections may be divided into three broad groups: 1. Infections resulting from animal bites and scratches : The most common infections caused by P. multocida are local wound infections following animal bites or scratches . cats are the source of infection in 60 to 80% of cases and dogs in the great majority of the remainder. Local infections are characterized by the rapid appearance of erythema, warmth, tenderness, and frequently purulent drainage. The most common local complications are abscess formation and tenosynovitis. Serious local complications include septic arthritis proximal to bites or scratches , osteomyelitis resulting from direct inoculation or extension of cellulitis, and the combination of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, most commonly involving a finger or hand after a cat bite. 2. Isolation of P. multocida from the respiratory tract: The isolation of P. multocida from the respiratory tract must be interpreted differently than its isolation from other systemic sites. Most commonly P. multocida found in the respiratory tract is a commensal organism in patients with underlying pulmonary disease, but serious respiratory tract infections including pneumonia, empyema, and lung abscesses may develop. Most patients with respiratory tract colonization or infection have a history of animal exposure. 3. Other systemic infections: P. multocida is recognized as a pathogen in a variety of systemic infections including bacteremia, meningitis, brain abscess, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and intra-abdominal abscess. P. multocida often acts as an opportunistic pathogen with a predilection for causing bacteremia in patients with liver dysfunction, septic arthritis in damaged joints, meningitis in the very young or elderly, and pulmonary colonization or invasion in patients with underlying respiratory tract abnormalities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
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7/10. Reaction to intraocular penetration of bentonite.

    A 20-year-old dental assistant had a severe case of anterior segment inflammation believed to be caused by bentonite, a component of Prophypaste. The patient's clinical course as well as animal studies, implicated bentonite as the offending agent.
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8/10. spinal cord abscess caused by listeria monocytogenes.

    listeria monocytogenes organisms were isolated from an intramedullary abscess in the cervical part of the spinal cord of an afebrile, previously healthy man who was occupationally exposed to farm animals. Acute neurologic abnormalities developed after a lumbar puncture, and cord widening was shown by myelography. Surgical decompression and antibiotic treatment for four weeks resulted in apparent bacteriologic cure with moderate neurologic sequelae.
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9/10. Subcutaneous abscess due to gallstones lost during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    No complications caused by gallstones lost during laparoscopic cholecystectomy have yet been described in the literature. In one animal study in rats, it has been shown that pigment calculi, but not cholesterol stones, lead to severe local inflammation of the abdominal cavity. We present a case of a chronic subcutaneous and subfascial abscess in the lower abdomen, which included multiple pigment calculi, six months after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. During the procedure, multiple small pigment calculi had been lost into the free abdominal cavity.
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10/10. breast abscess caused by brucella melitensis.

    Cutaneous and soft tissue lesions are uncommon manifestations of brucellosis. Though breast involvement in animal brucellosis is not uncommon, involvement of the breast in human brucellosis is extremely rare. We report a case of breast abscess in a 39-year-old female caused by brucella melitensis. Treatment with combination of trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (TMP/ SMX; cotrimoxazole) and doxycycline for 3 months resulted in clinical cure.
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