Cases reported "Abscess"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/139. Infratentorial subdural empyema, pituitary abscess, and septic cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis secondary to paranasal sinusitis: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Infratentorial empyema, pituitary abscess, and septic cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis are all rare and potentially lethal conditions. The occurrence of all three in a single patient has not previously been described. We present such a case occurring in a young, otherwise healthy man. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 26-year-old man with a remote history of sinusitis developed rapidly progressive headache, fever, right eye pain, swelling, proptosis, and visual impairment. magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse pansinusitis, including sphenoid sinusitis, and extension of inflammation and infection into the adjacent cavernous sinuses, pituitary gland, and posterior fossa. INTERVENTION: Urgent drainage of the ethmoid and maxillary sinuses was performed; pus was not identified. The patient continued to deteriorate clinically with worsening of visual acuity. Computed tomography of the head performed the next day revealed worsening hydrocephalus and an enlarging posterior fossa subdural empyema. Urgent ventricular drainage and evacuation of the empyema was performed, and subsequently, the patient's clinical course improved. The microbiology results revealed alpha hemolytic streptococcus and coagulase-negative staphylococcus species. The patient survived but during the follow-up period had a blind right eye and pituitary insufficiency. CONCLUSION: Paranasal sinusitis can have devastating intracranial sequelae. Involvement of the adjacent pituitary gland and cavernous sinuses can result in serious neurological morbidity or mortality, and retrograde spread of infection through the basal venous system can result in subdural or parenchymal brain involvement. A high index of suspicion and aggressive medical and surgical treatment are crucial for patient survival, but the morbidity rate remains high. Our patient survived but lost anterior pituitary function and vision in his right eye.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mortality
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/139. Ruptured tuboovarian abscess in late pregnancy. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Tuboovarian abscess is an unusual obstetric complication that causes maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. CASE: A woman, G1, P0, with a 32-week pregnancy presented with abdominal pain. physical examination on admission revealed fever and unremarkable abdominal signs. Eleven hours after admission, signs of peritonitis became prominent, necessitating emergency laparotomy. Surgical findings included an 8-cm, right, ruptured tuboovarian abscess with massive purulent contamination of the abdominal cavity. Cesarean hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Neither the newborn nor the mother had postoperative complications. CONCLUSION: Since there are discrepancies in the incidences of tuboovarian abscess in pregnant and nonpregnant groups, the pathogenesis of tuboovarian abscess may be different in the two populations. In pregnancy, diagnosis and management are also more difficult than in the nonpregnant state. Clinical data may not reveal the diagnosis until surgery is mandatory. Because most pregnant women with tuboovarian abscesses are young, conservative surgery should be attempted if the pathology is limited to only one side of the adnexa and further reproduction is desired.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mortality
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/139. Endocardial abscesses in children: case report and review of the literature.

    The rarity of perivalvular abscesses arising as a complication of bacterial endocarditis in the pediatric population limits its recognition and awareness of its often malignant course. The diagnosis depends on a combination of clinical criteria, including persistent fever and bacteremia, the presence of an atrioventricular block and persistent embolic phenomenon, and transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiographic confirmation. Because of the infrequency of perivalvular abscesses in children, there is no consensus on a treatment strategy. Early detection and intervention with antibiotics and surgical debridement are recommended to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. A case of a 14-year-old boy with an aortic root abscess is presented, along with review of other cases reported in the last 20 years in children in relation to risk factors, clinical features, diagnosis, therapy, and mortality.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = mortality
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/139. Subretinal abscess due to nocardia farcinica infection.

    PURPOSE: nocardia infection of the eye is uncommon. A case of choroidal abscess due to nocardia farcinica infection is presented, and the literature is reviewed. methods: A 41-year-old immunocompromised man with chronic myeloid leukemia developed a unilateral choroidal abscess. N. farcinica was isolated from a simultaneous subcutaneous abscess and both infections responded to systemic sulfonamide therapy. RESULTS: Three weeks after discontinuation of the sulfonamides, the choroidal abscess recurred with involvement of the vitreous. The infection was brought under control after reinstitution of the same drug. CONCLUSIONS: Nocardiosis is a multisystem disease that has high mortality and ocular morbidity rates. The eyes of immunocompromised patients should be examined frequently as early detection and administration of the proper antibiotics may reduce the risk of this life-threatening infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mortality
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/139. Perinephric abscess presenting as chronic diarrhea.

    Perinephric abscess is an uncommon diagnosis with a variable presentation and high mortality. We report an unusual case of a patient with a perinephric abscess who presented with chronic diarrhea and weight loss.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mortality
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/139. Pituitary abscess presenting with cranial nerve paresis. Case report and review of literature.

    Non-adenomatosus lesions of the pituitary represent a small part of the intrasellar processes and they have heterogeneous presentation. Making a precise diagnosis is of great importance, as it may lead to more efficient management. A 65-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of headache and right cranial nerve III palsy. Basic laboratory work-up was normal whereas endocrinological assessment revealed hypopituitarism without diabetes insipidus. Plain radiography showed an enlarged sella and frontal and paranasal sinusitis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the sella revealed an intrasellar lesion with extension to the sphenoid and cavernous sinuses as well as the suprasellar region, exerting pressure on the optic chiasm. On T1-weighted images the mass had a low-intensity signal with a smooth enhancing rim with bright signal. Given the presence of multiple sinusitis and imaging characteristics a pre-operative diagnosis of pituitary abscess was made. The patient was operated via transphenoidal route and purulent material was drained out. Cultures of the material were positive for staphylococcus aureus. Antibiotics as well as cortisol replacement therapy were given. Three months later hypopituitarism persisted but there was significant improvement in the neurological findings. We report a case of an unusual presentation of a pituitary abscess. High index of suspicion, the presence of associated conditions such as pituitary tumors, meningitis or sinusitis, as well as diabetes insipidus and specific imaging features are the main diagnostic clues. Pre-operative diagnosis, which will lead to prompt antibiotic therapy and transphenoidal drainage, can decrease high mortality and morbidity associated with this disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mortality
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/139. Patch reconstruction of the mitral annulus for active infective endocarditis with annular abscess.

    Active infective endocarditis is associated with high operative mortality and morbidity. The outcome may be improved by operating at the optimal time using the most appropriate surgical procedure. We describe a 15-year-old man with active infective endocarditis of the mitral valve associated with an annular abscess. disseminated intravascular coagulation was associated with progressive decrease in the platelet count. The abscess was debrided, the mitral annulus was patch-reconstructed using bovine pericardium treated with glutaraldehyde, then the mitral valve was replaced. The patient was discharged from intensive care unit 3 days after operation with clinical and blood examination improvement. The patient is being observed carefully by periodic follow-up echocardiography, and there is no evidence of PVD, PVE or calcification of the patch during 14 months of follow-up period. Patch reconstruction of the annulus using bovine pericardium treated with glutaraldehyde reinforced the annulus and prevented local reinfection of the prosthesis in this patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mortality
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/139. Crohn's disease presenting as left gluteal abscess.

    Although abscesses and fistulae are common complications of Crohn's disease, the gluteal area is a rare site for abscess formation. The abscess results from extension of pus through the fascial plains of the pelvis and through the greater sciatic foramen into the gluteal area. This is the first reported left gluteal abscess due to Crohn's disease as pus extends across the midline to the left side. The clinical picture can be misleading and diagnosing the source of infection may be difficult. Incision of this abscess without identifying the source of infection will result in enterocutaneous fistula. Ultrasound guided aspiration of the abscess as well as treatment of metabolic deficiencies and septicaemia before definitive surgical treatment of the bowel disease will reduce the morbidity and mortality of this rare complication. The clinical picture, management of this complication and review of the literature are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mortality
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/139. streptococcus agalactiae endocarditis and giant pyomyoma simulating ovarian cancer.

    Group B streptococcus (streptococcus agalactiae) is a common etiology of bacteremia among adults. Pyomyoma is a rare infectious complication of uterine leiomyomas. We report the case of a diabetic postmenopausal woman with a giant pyomyoma simulating an ovarian cancer. It was associated with S. agalactiae endocarditis and deep venous thrombosis of the right external iliac and femoral veins. Treated initially with intravenous penicillin, amikacin, and anticoagulation, the patient later had abdominal hysterectomy with an uneventful recovery. We also review the cases of pyomyoma reported since 1945. Of 14 cases described (including ours), mortality was 21%. endocarditis was never reported in association with pyomyoma. The presence of bacteremia and a leiomyoma should raise suspicion for this disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mortality
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/139. Primary tuberculosis in the gluteal muscle of a patient with chronic renal failure. A rare presentation.

    patients suffering from chronic renal failure (CRF) are at increased risk for contracting tuberculosis (TB) due to their impaired immunity. In this patient group, extrapulmonary involvement is more common than the pulmonary form of TB, and symptoms tend to be milder and less distinctive than those seen in the general population. pyomyositis secondary to TB is relatively rare. We report a case of TB pyomyositis in the setting of CRF. The nonspecific symptoms that are typical of CRF patients with TB make it particularly difficult to establish the diagnosis in this patient group. In order to avoid diagnostic delays, which may increase the risk of complications and mortality, TB should be kept in mind in any case of ongoing fever and infection that does not respond to seemingly appropriate therapy. In addition, TB should always be suspected in endemic areas, even in the absence of osseous involvement.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mortality
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Abscess'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.