Cases reported "Abscess"

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1/90. Pyogenic infection of the pubic symphysis in a diabetic patient.

    A 51-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus had swelling in the inguinal area leading to discharge. insulin, irrigation of the wound and intravenous antibiotics had no effect. Fistulography and a fistula-CT showed a fistula connecting to the pubis symphysis. After curettage of the pubic symphysis, the wound was closed.
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keywords = wound
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2/90. Three cases of arcanobacterium haemolyticum associated with abscess formation and cellulitis.

    arcanobacterium haemolyticum has been described as an unusual pathogen causing pharyngotonsillitis and systemic disease in patients with predisposing conditions. A case of soft tissue abscess with no apparent portal of entry is reported in a healthy 31-year-old man who presented with a breast tumor. A second case of abscess formation in a 50-year-old patient with complicated wound healing is presented. In addition, a case of arcanobacterium haemolyticum cellulitis in a 25-year-old female is reported. Due to its innocuous, coryneform appearance, this pathogen is probably underreported; therefore, the diagnostic evaluation of this organism is emphasized.
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keywords = wound
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3/90. Xanthogranulomatous tubo-ovarian abscess resulting from chronic diverticulitis.

    We report a case of xanthogranulomatous tubo-ovarian abscess which was preoperatively suspected to be an adnexal neoplasm. With foreign body material found in the abscess wall and vegetable fiber in the tubal lumen, a previously treated chronic diverticulitis was the presumed cause. culture studies showed polymicrobial isolates which included escherichia coli, an enteric pathogen. After surgery, administration of antibiotics, and revision of delayed subcutaneous wound healing, the patient is reportedly well.
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4/90. Successful high dose therapy for relapsed mediastinal large B cell lymphoma following surgical repair of anterior chest wall defect.

    We describe a man with relapsed large B cell mediastinal lymphoma and associated infected large anterior chest wall defect who required high dose salvage therapy for his underlying disease. An initial mediastinotomy wound, associated with recurrent sepsis, had developed into an abscess, then fistula and eventually a large anterior chest wall defect. Safe use of salvage chemotherapy required reconstructive surgery consisting of a pedicled muscle flap. The subsequent high dose chemotherapy was carried out without complications and 15 months later the patient is alive and well.
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keywords = wound
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5/90. Combined ingestion and subcutaneous injection of elemental mercury.

    A 40-year-old man with a history of schizophrenia and inflammatory soft tissue lesions after self-injection of elemental mercury presented to the Emergency Department. Multiple skin abscesses associated with fever required operative debridement. An incidental finding of oral mercury ingestion was followed clinically and did not result in complications. Exposure to elemental mercury through injection or ingestion is an uncommon event, but one the Emergency Physician may encounter. Subcutaneous mercury injection should be managed with local wound debridement, whereas ingestions are rarely of clinical significance.
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6/90. Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding as a late complication of spinal instrumentation.

    Posterior or anterior fusion with spinal instrumentation is a well-known operation for scoliosis. There are multiple potential complications; the most common are blood loss during the initial surgery and wound infection. Vascular injury has been reported. However, to the authors' knowledge, acute gastrointestinal bleeding has not been reported. The authors report on a child who presented 6 years after posterior spinal instrumentation with massive acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding resulting from internal iliac artery injury and bowel perforation. The etiology, diagnosis, and management of such bleeding is reviewed.
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ranking = 5.4343181575995
keywords = wound infection, wound
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7/90. Group F streptococcal bacteremia complicating a Bartholin's abscess.

    BACKGROUND: Group F streptococci are gram-positive cocci typically isolated from wound infections and abscesses. bacteremia with group F streptococcus is uncommon, and the lower gynecologic tract has not been reported as a source. We report a case of a Bartholin's abscess leading to group F streptococcal bacteremia. CASE: A 31-year-old female noted fever and rigors 30 min after manipulation of a 3-day-old vulvar abscess. An empty Bartholin's gland abscess was found on examination, and blood cultures grew beta-hemolytic group F streptococci. The patient was treated with ampicillin/sulbactam, symptoms improved, and follow-up blood cultures revealed no growth. CONCLUSION: Group F streptococci are known to inhabit various body sites and have a predilection for forming abscesses; however, bacteremia is infrequent. They have occasionally been identified in true infections of the genitourinary tract but only very rarely in Bartholin's abscesses. This case of group F streptococcal bacteremia following self-drainage of a Bartholin's abscess constitutes the first such description in the medical literature.
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ranking = 5.4343181575995
keywords = wound infection, wound
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8/90. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging-guided drainage of nonpalpable abscesses.

    SUMMARY: Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging provides the surgeon with powerful, high-resolution, real-time imaging. Procedures may be performed with minimal invasion, with the benefit of reduced tissue damage, improved wound healing, and a better cosmetic result. The authors present a case of a leukemic pediatric patient with a few large, deeply situated, nonpalpable abscesses that were drained successfully with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging guidance. In this case, this new intraoperative imaging method enabled minimal invasiveness, with fast recovery.
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keywords = wound
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9/90. Unusual nosocomial transmission of mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    This case report describes how a late diagnosis of a tuberculous abscess combined with daily irrigation of the wound without barrier precautions led to nosocomial transmission of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Among 372 hospital contacts, 16 had a tuberculin skin test conversion and two developed active pulmonary tuberculosis with the same strain as that isolated from the index patient's abscess. When a culture from an abscess remains negative, mycobacterium tuberculosis infection should be considered. Furthermore, wound irrigation should be done with proper barrier precautions because infectious aerosols can be created during the irrigation process.
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keywords = wound
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10/90. Pasteurella canis osteomyelitis and cutaneous abscess after a domestic dog bite.

    The genus Pasteurella is part of the normal oral flora of many animals, including domestic cats and dogs. In humans, Pasteurella may cause complications ranging from cellulitis to septicemia but rarely causes osteomyelitis or septic arthritis after bites and/or scratches by cats and dogs. Although pasteurella multocida is a common cause of infection, other Pasteurella species have also been cultured from wounds in humans. We describe here, a case of a cutaneous abscess and acute osteomyelitis associated with P canis after a domestic dog bite. To our knowledge, no previous case of P canis has been reported as the cause of acute osteomyelitis in humans.
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keywords = wound
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