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1/104. Pseudogaucher cells in cutaneous Mycobacterium avium intracellulare infection: report of a case.

    We report on a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and with cutaneous Mycobacterium avium intracellulare, in whom many cells with abundant reticulated cytoplasm resembling the characteristic cells of Gauchers disease ("pseudogaucher cells") were noted within the dermal infiltrate on biopsy. Although pseudogaucher cells have been reported in association with M. avium intracellulare infection in extracutaneous sites, this is, to our knowledge, the first report of cutaneous pseudogaucher cells in the skin.
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keywords = avium
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2/104. arthritis due to mycobacterium fortuitum.

    mycobacterium fortuitum is classified as a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) according to the Runyon classification. RGM are increasingly being recognized as human pathogens. Joint infection due to M. fortuitum is a rare, but serious disease. This report describes a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and septic arthritis of the knee due to M. fortuitum in a previously normal joint with no history of surgery or intra-articular injections.
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keywords = mycobacterium
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3/104. Successful treatment of chylous ascites secondary to mycobacterium avium complex in a patient with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    chylous ascites is a rare form of ascites, the presence of which generally denotes a very poor long term prognosis. We report the case of a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and massive chylous ascites secondary to mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, identified in the ascitic fluid by a dna probe assay. With multidrug anti-MAC therapy the ascites resolved completely, and the patient has survived for >21 months. diagnosis and treatment of MAC-related chylous ascites are reviewed.
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keywords = avium
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4/104. coinfection of visceral leishmaniasis and Mycobacterium in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    We report a case of coinfection of visceral leishmaniasis and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare in the same lesions in the small bowel and bone marrow of a 33-year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who complained of abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea. The duodenal mucosa and bone marrow biopsy specimens showed numerous foamy macrophages packed with two forms of microorganisms that were identified histologically and ultrastructurally as Leishmania and Mycobacterium species. Visceral leishmaniasis is rarely suspected in patients residing in nonendemic countries including the united states. It should be included in the differential diagnosis for opportunistic infection in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. An appropriate travel history is important. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case showing coinfection of visceral leishmaniasis and Mycobacterium avium-intracelluulare in the same lesion in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.
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keywords = avium
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5/104. Haemorrhagic cystitis associated with adenovirus in a patient with AIDS treated for a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Adenovirus-induced haemorrhagic cystitis has been reported chiefly in bone marrow or kidney transplant recipients. We report here on an hiv-positive patient treated for a Burkitt's lymphoma who developed gross haematuria associated with fever and burning urination. Usual causes of haematuria were ruled out: lithiasis, urinary tract lesions, glomerulonephritis, mycobacterium and schistosoma infections, and drug toxicity. Adenovirus was detected by cellular cultures and BK/jc virus dna sequences were detected using a polymerase chain reaction method. Because BK/JC virus shedding is very common (75%) in hiv patients receiving chemotherapy, our data strongly suggest that adenovirus was responsible for the haemorrhagic cystitis in our patient. In conclusion, adenovirus should be considered as a potential cause of haemorrhagic cystitis in AIDS patients whose immunosuppression is aggravated by cytotoxic drugs.
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ranking = 0.34049978450793
keywords = mycobacterium
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6/104. Hypercalcaemia: a clue to Mycobacterium avium intracellulare infection in a patient with AIDS.

    Hypercalcaemia is uncommon in hiv-infected patients and should suggest a different priority for differential diagnosis than would be considered in other settings. Although hypercalcaemia has long been associated with granulomatous diseases including tuberculosis, it has only recently been recognised that patients with illness due to Mycobacterium avium intracellulare (MAI) may develop it. We report a patient with AIDS in whom unexplained hypercalcaemia was the harbinger of clinically significant MAI infection. patients with AIDS who develop hypercalcaemia should be closely evaluated for underlying MAI infection.
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keywords = avium
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7/104. PCR-restriction enzyme analysis of a bone marrow isolate from a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient discloses polyclonal infection with two Mycobacterium avium strains.

    Polyclonal infection by Mycobacterium avium was detected by hsp65 PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (PRA) in a bone marrow isolate from an AIDS patient. Two M. avium strains, differing in colony morphology, PRA HaeIII digestion pattern, insertion element (IS) 1245 amplification, and restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprints with IS1245 and IS1311 probes, were isolated.
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8/104. Case report. diagnosis of disseminated mycobacterium avium complex infection by liver biopsy.

    mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection is a common complication of hiv/AIDS. signs and symptoms of this infection are nonspecific and include fever, weight loss, diarrhea, and abnormal levels of liver enzymes, especially elevated alkaline phosphatase levels. diagnosis can be achieved through several methods, but liver biopsy may be the most rapid and efficient. We present a case that illustrates the potential value of liver biopsy in diagnosing disseminated MAC infection.
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keywords = avium
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9/104. Two cases of long lasting bacteremia due to mycobacterium avium complex despite new macrolides-containing regimens in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    The prognosis of mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection has been improved by new macrolides-containing regimens and the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report on two AIDS cases with long lasting bacteremia due to MAC under this regimen. Both patients experienced problems due to side effects from the anti-MAC regimen and from an immune-reconstitution syndrome related to HAART. MAC infection persisted despite treatment, however, no anti-MAC drug-resistant isolates emerged throughout the clinical course in either case. These cases demonstrate that therapy for disseminated MAC infection is sometimes difficult even with HAART and macrolides-containing regimens.
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keywords = avium
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10/104. Hypercalcaemia and elevated 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels associated with disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in AIDS.

    Hypercalcaemia may complicate granulomatous diseases, such as tuberculosis and sarcoidosis, and various aids-related opportunistic infections and malignancies. We report here two patients with AIDS and disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection who developed symptomatic hypercalcaemia several weeks after commencing antimycobacterial chemotherapy, and in whom inappropriately elevated 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)levels were documented. Although vitamin d supplementation may have contributed, no other cause for the hypercalcaemia was found. The biochemical and clinical similarities between these cases and other hypercalcaemic granulomatous diseases suggest a common mechanism related to macrophage activation and dysregulated vitamin d production.
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keywords = avium
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