Cases reported "Acute Disease"

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1/130. lymphangioma circumscriptum of the tongue.

    A case is reported of severe transient macroglossia after biopsy from the tongue in a 13-year-old boy who has had intermittent macroglossia since the age of 1 year as a result of extensive lymphangioma circumscriptum of the tongue. The acute lesions appear to result from haemorrhage into the lymphatic spaces following rupture of blood vessels in connective tissue septa and possibly secondary infection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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2/130. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the management of severe acute anaemia in a Jehovah's witness.

    A case is described in which a Jehovah's Witness patient who refused blood transfusion suffered massive antepartum haemorrhage, her haemoglobin falling as low as 2.0 g.dl(-1). She was treated on an intensive care unit with intermittent positive pressure ventilation and general supportive measures, pulsed hyperbaric oxygen therapy and recombinant human erythropoietin.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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3/130. Acute cholecystitis secondary to hemobilia.

    Invasive diagnostic and therapeutic techniques such as percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting, and laparoscopic cholecystectomy have led to a rise in hemobilia. Most complications from hemobilia are attributable to acute blood loss; other complications are secondary to thrombus formation in the biliary tree. We present a case report of acute cholecystitis secondary to hemobilia after percutaneous liver biopsy. The role of ERCP in the diagnosis and treatment of this exceedingly rare event is discussed.
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ranking = 0.34731307829863
keywords = blood loss
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4/130. ovarian cysts in childhood.

    This is a review of cases of ovarian cyst encountered in childhood in the Manchester children's hospitals. The patients presented with acute or recurrent abdominal pain or an abdominal or pelvic mass. The commonest cyst found was a teratoma, which was discovered because of its size or because of a complication. All but one of the girls with teratomas had not reached puberty. After puberty the cysts were follicular or luteal in type, although there was one case of cystadenoma. Complications in the form of torsion, rupture which haemoperitoneum or haemorrhage into the cyst were common. Treatment consisted of ovarian cystectomy, oophorectomy or salpingo-oophorectomy, and the results were satisfactory.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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5/130. antithrombin iii concentrate in the acute phase of thermal injury.

    BACKGROUND: Thermal injury disrupts homeostasis by inducing subclinical disseminated intravascular coagulation, fibrinolysis. and an acquired deficiency of antithrombin iii (ATIII), a natural anticoagulant. As a result, thermally injured patients have a high incidence of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. OBJECTIVE: ATIII (Human) concentrate was given to a thermally injured patient to evaluate safety, and dosage requirements in this setting. DESIGN: The patient was a 40 yr old male with a 68% total burn surface area, right femoral comminuted fracture, and C5-C6 subluxation sustained in a vehicular crash. He received nine infusions of AT III (H) concentrate (100-50 u/kg) within the first four days of injury. RESULT: The ATIII plasma level increased from 45% on admission (normal = 100 /-20%) to 120 /-25% in the next four days. During the 64 day hospitalization, there were 11 grafting procedures with an estimated blood loss (EBL)/procedure: 1140 cc; and EBL/grafted surface area ratio: 0.6 cc cm2. The average time to healing of the meshed autograft was 6.4 days. CONCLUSION: ATIII (H) concentrate can be safely utilized in the acute phase of thermal injury: no excessive bleeding or prolongation of wound healing was documented.
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ranking = 0.34731307829863
keywords = blood loss
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6/130. Acute pulmonary haemorrhage in an infant during induction of general anaesthesia.

    Pulmonary haemorrhage is a rare, life-threatening complication of anaesthesia. This report describes the anaesthetic management of an infant who developed laryngospasm and pulmonary haemorrhage during general anaesthesia. The infant was subsequently found to have prior exposure to a fungus, stachybotrys chartarum, which produces mycotoxins that may have produced capillary fragility in the infant's rapidly growing lungs.
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ranking = 6
keywords = haemorrhage
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7/130. Hemorrhagic adrenal cyst: an unusual reason of acute hypovolemia.

    Adrenal cysts are often asymptomatic and included in the larger "incidentaloma" group. They may reach significant size without onset of compressive symptoms and are often left undiagnosed until an ultrasound or CT scan are performed for a vague lumbar or flank discomfort. Intracystic hemorrhage is a rare but life-threatening complication since a sudden and significant blood loss may occur without any evident clinical source, hypovolemic shock resulting as the first symptom. The authors report their personal experience in two patients along with a review of the literature on this insidious emergency, its diagnosis and therapeutic approach.
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ranking = 0.34731307829863
keywords = blood loss
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8/130. Lateral canthotomy and inferior cantholysis: an effective method of urgent orbital decompression for sight threatening acute retrobulbar haemorrhage.

    Retrobulbar haemorrhage (RBH) occurs in a variety of situations. It can complicate facial fractures, orbital surgery and retrobulbar injections and can occur spontaneously. It is relatively uncommon and sight-threatening RBH is even less common. If not detected early enough it can lead to devastating loss of vision. We have collected five cases of acute RBH, following trauma, associated with a profound reduction in vision. In each case a permanent loss of vision was avoided using a lateral canthotomy and inferior cantholysis approach to obtain urgent orbital decompression.
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ranking = 5
keywords = haemorrhage
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9/130. serum procalcitonin and proinflammatory cytokines in a patient with acute severe leptospirosis.

    leptospirosis is a zoonosis, with clinical manifestations ranging from the imperceptible to severe, potentially fatal renal and liver failure accompanied by haemorrhage and jaundice. In this case report of a patient with severe leptospirosis, serum levels of procalcitonin decreased ahead of any obvious clinical improvement, and thus may be useful as a prognostic marker. Levels of soluble IL-2 receptor were very high and correlated well with the clinical course.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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10/130. Haemorrhagic lumbar synovial cyst. A cause of acute radiculopathy.

    A total of 254 cases of synovial cysts of the spine have been reported in the English literature, but only eight have been associated with haemorrhage. We describe a 55-year-old man with acute radiculopathy resulting from haemorrhage involving a synovial cyst at a lumbar facet joint. Traumatic factors could have caused bleeding around or into the synovial cyst. Treatment by resection of the cyst and evacuation of the haematoma led to complete neurological recovery.
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ranking = 2
keywords = haemorrhage
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