Cases reported "Acute Disease"

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1/703. Acute leukemia with the phenotype of a natural killer/T cell bipotential precursor.

    An acute leukemia with an unusual immunophenotype developed in a 17-year-old girl. At the initial presentation, extramedullary involvement was not evident, but with advancing disease, massive splenomegaly and an osteolytic rib tumor developed. The disease was aggressive and refractory to intensive chemotherapeutic regimens for myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, and the patient died 3 months after the initial presentation. The leukemic cells were of irregular shape and variable size; they had deeply indented or bi-lobed nuclei and relatively fine, azurophilic granules in their cytoplasm. They were positive for acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase in granular staining, but they were negative for myeloperoxidase. The leukemic cells had a unique immunophenotype: it was positive for T-cell antigens (CD1a, CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, CD4), myeloid antigens (CD13 and CD33), NK-cell antigen (CD56), CD19 and CD30. dna analysis revealed no gene rearrangement in the T-cell receptor beta, gamma and delta, or immunoglobulin heavy chain genes. The leukemic cells of our patient are thought to have arisen from the transformation of a putative precursor cell common to both the T- and NK-cell lineage in the bone marrow. The current literature on precursor NK-cell malignancy is reviewed, and its clinicopathological feature is discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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2/703. Lessons to be learned: a case study approach. Primary hyperparathyroidism simulating an acute severe polyneuritis.

    The case is presented of a 65 year old lady with recent onset of neuromuscular manifestations, comprising paraparesis, areflexia and unsteady gait, along with episodes of slurring of speech and diplopia, later confirmed to be due to severe hypercalcaemia--which itself was caused by primary hyperparathyroidism. Restoration of normocalcaemia, by means of rehydration and bisphosphonate therapy, resulted in clinical improvement--whilst subsequent parathyroidectomy was followed by complete resolution of all symptoms. In order to make prompt differentiation between the neurological sequelae of hyperparathyroidism and a primary neurological disorder, a high index of suspicion is required. An urgent serum calcium assay, as part of a bone profile, is mandatory in patients who present with neurological symptoms--especially the elderly, amongst whom hyperparathyroidism is especially common.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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3/703. Acute inflammatory neuropathy in charcot-marie-tooth disease.

    The authors report an association between acute inflammatory neuropathy and previously undiagnosed Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A disease in a 15-year-old girl. sural nerve biopsy study showed hypertrophic neuropathy with endoneurial infiltrates of macrophages and lymphocytes. This association may be coincidental, but a particular susceptibility to damage of these peripheral nerves cannot be excluded. This report confirms the importance of pes cavus as a sign of long-standing sensorimotor neuropathy.
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ranking = 14.941406412562
keywords = macrophage
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4/703. Clinical outcome in three patients with myelodysplastic syndrome showing polyclonal hematopoiesis.

    The clinical outcome of 3 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with polyclonal hematopoiesis is reported. All patients were heterozygous for the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) gene. The presence of polyclonal hematopoiesis was determined by the X-chromosome-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism-methylation method using the PGK gene as a marker. The patients were initially diagnosed as having refractory anemia (RA), RA with ring sideroblasts (RARS), and RA with an excess of blasts (RAEB), respectively. Their pancytopenia persisted during the follow-up period of 11.4 years for the RA patient, 19.5 years for the RARS patient and 0.8 years for the RAEB patient. Although the RARS patient continues to be in good health, leukemic transformation occurred in the other 2 patients. A karyotype change from 46,XX to 45,XX,t(3;21),-7 was observed at the time of disease progression in the RA patient. The coexistence of a monoclonal MDS clone and normal bone marrow cells is thought to be the most probable reason for the polyclonal hematopoiesis of these patients.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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5/703. Induction of hyperacute graft-vs-host disease after donor leukocyte infusions.

    BACKGROUND: Infusions of leukocytes obtained from the original bone marrow donor is a new approach for treating patients who have a relapse of leukemia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Up to 90% of patients who achieved remission developed graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). However, any description of the clinical and histologic features in these cases is lacking. OBSERVATIONS: We describe 2 patients in whom a severe, peculiar, hyperacute, fatal GVHD developed after treatment with donor leukocyte infusions and interferon alfa. The patients had not received any additional chemotherapy or GVHD prophylaxis. In both patients, the eruption started with the appearance of erythematous plaques at the interferon alfa injection sites, and a generalized maculopapular eruption subsequently developed. The clinical lesions evolved from acute to lichenoid within several days. The histologic examination also demonstrated unusual findings and showed features of both acute and chronic lichenoid GVHD. CONCLUSIONS: Donor leukocyte infusions without GVHD prophylaxis may provoke a severe fatal hyperacute GVHD. In the cases presented herein, we discuss the significance of the rapid clinical evolution from acute to lichenoid and the combination of histologic features of both acute and chronic GVHD in the biopsy specimens.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bone
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6/703. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder mimicking a nonspecific lymphocytic pleural effusion in a bone marrow transplant recipient. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Serous effusions are rare complications of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and result mainly from infections or tumor relapse. CASE: We report a case of posttransplantation lympho-proliferative disorder (PTLD) revealed by cytodiagnostic examination of serous effusions in a BMT recipient. The effusion was initially considered reactive, but morphologic, immunocytologic and molecular studies subsequently revealed PTLD. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates the importance of cytologic examination of effusions in BMT or organ recipients. Since most PTLDs are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and T cells predominate in reactive effusions, appropriate initial immunostaining, including CD3, CD79a and EBV latent membrane protein, should aid in their early detection.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bone
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7/703. Vaginal stenosis following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia.

    We report the unusual complication of vaginal stenosis occurring after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for leukaemia. This was in all likelihood a manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), although the patient has no other stigmata of this and suffered little acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after BMT. Other risk factors for vaginal stenosis were considered and appear to be absent in this patient, although the total body irradiation used as part of her conditioning therapy may play a role. We suggest that vaginal stenosis may be under-reported, since female patients suffer a number of gynaecological complications after BMT, and that regular questioning and examination may aid in making an earlier diagnosis, allowing speedier instigation of therapy and thus improving quality of life.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bone
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8/703. thalidomide in children undergoing bone marrow transplantation: series at a single institution and review of the literature.

    thalidomide has one of the most notorious drug histories because of its teratogenicity. Its widespread use in the 1960s led to a worldwide epidemic of phocomelia in inborns; this in turn led to its complete ban in most of the world. However, it has now been licensed for selected indications including graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation, wasting associated with tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection, and leprosy. Little is known, however, about its use in children in these settings. Therefore, we report our experience and review the literature on thalidomide in children for GVHD after bone marrow transplantation. We studied 6 patients, 2 with chronic GVHD, 2 with acute GVHD, and 2 with acute GVHD progressing into chronic disease. One patient with chronic GVHD had a complete response, whereas the other had a partial response. Side effects consisted primarily of sedation and constipation, which are reported previously and well known side effects. None had neuropathy. One patient had rash, eosinophilia, and early pancreatitis that began shortly after initiation of thalidomide, persisted, and resolved only after discontinuation of thalidomide. eosinophilia and pancreatitis are both previously unreported side effects or associated findings of thalidomide treatment. review of the literature reveals three major studies of thalidomide in GVHD; of these two included children and adults together, and one in which age range of patients was not mentioned. In addition, four series of children receiving only thalidomide are reported. These series contained 1 to 14 patients each. Results show efficacy in at least 50% of children with chronic GVHD and little or no efficacy in children with exclusively acute GVHD. Side effects are similar to those reported in adults and consisted mostly of sedation and constipation, both of which subsided over time and resolved after discontinuing the drug. We speculate on the reasons for which thalidomide is more effective in chronic, compared with acute, GVHD in children, and make recommendations for future study.
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ranking = 6
keywords = bone
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9/703. Pure red cell aplasia evolving through the hyperfibrotic myelodysplastic syndrome to the acute myeloid leukemia: some pathogenetic aspects.

    The authors report a 58-year-old female who originally presented with acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). At diagnosis, the karyotype was normal, the serum erythropoietin level was highly elevated and no T-cell mediated inhibition of erythropoiesis was demonstrated in coculture studies. Conventional immunosuppressive therapy proved ineffective. A year later a diagnosis of hyperfibrotic myelodysplastic syndrome was assessed. The sequential bone marrow examinations in the course of the three years showed a progressive increase in bone marrow fibrosis, erythroid hyperplasia and dysmegakaryocytopoiesis, terminating in the acute myeloid leukemia. This sequence of the events included the appearance of del(5)(q13q33), four years after setting a diagnosis of PRCA. The authors suggest that the absence of both cytogenetic abnormality and the signs of dyshematopoiesis at the diagnosis of PRCA does not exclude ultimately a "clonal" category of the disease. Thus, repeated hematological and cytogenetical reevaluations are recommended.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bone
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10/703. Lineage switch in childhood leukemia with monosomy 7 and reverse of lineage switch in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    Morphophenotypic lineage switches occur in a small percentage of those with acute leukemia, and the underlying mechanisms are not clear. In this study, we attempted to induce a lineage switch in acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) with monosomy 7, whose lineage had switched from acute T-lymphocytic leukemia (T-ALL) during chemotherapy, in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Although the transplanted myeloid cells were engrafted in SCID mice without cytokine administration, T-ALL developed in SCID mice treated with recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or recombinant human interleukin 3. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the rearranged T-cell receptor gamma-chain (TCR-gamma) gene revealed that this lineage switch resulted from the selection of the T-lineage subclone in SCID mice, which had expanded at onset. In addition, we found that the T-lineage and myeloid cells belonged to the distinct subclones, which were different in TCR-gamma gene rearrangements, but were derived from a common clone with an identical N-ras gene mutation for both subclones. In in vitro cultures, only the myeloid subclone grew; the T-lineage subclone failed to grow even in the presence of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or recombinant human interleukin 3. These results suggested that the initial diagnostic T-lymphoid subclone, whose growth was dependent on these cytokines and the hematopoietic microenvironment, emerged from a bipotential T-lymphoid/myeloid leukemic stem cell, and further genetic event(s) induced the myeloid subclone, which grew independently of these cytokines and the microenvironment.
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ranking = 29.882812825124
keywords = macrophage
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