Cases reported "Acute Disease"

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1/67. listeria monocytogenes-induced endogenous endophthalmitis in an otherwise healthy individual: rapid PCR-diagnosis as the basis for effective treatment.

    PURPOSE: listeria monocytogenes is a rare cause of endogenous endophthalmitis. To date 15 cases have been published in the literature. All eyes showed similar clinical features and profound visual loss mainly due to delayed diagnosis. methods: An additional case of an otherwise healthy 73 year-old male, who was referred to our hospital because of acute iridocyclitis with secondary glaucoma, is reported. Within a few days the severity of the intraocular infection increased dramatically, resulting in the clinical picture of acute endophthalmitis. RESULTS: In contrast to most published cases, early identification of the causative pathogen in the aqueous humor after anterior chamber puncture using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the initiation of a specific, systemic antibiotic medication, resulted in-complete recovery of visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS: PCR is very useful for the identification of the pathogen in intraocular infections.
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2/67. Acute retention of urine due to prolapsed ectopic ureterocele in an adult male.

    A case is presented of prolapsed ectopic ureterocele which produced severe urinary retention in a 31-year-old male patient. The usefulness of lumbar transcutaneous puncture is emphasized in a case associated with a non-functioning upper pole of a duplex kidney.
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3/67. Nontraumatic acute spinal subdural hematoma: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    Acute subdural spinal hematoma occurs rarely; however, when it does occur, it may have disastrous consequences. The authors assessed the outcome of surgery for this lesion in relation to causative factors and diagnostic imaging (computerized tomography [CT], CT myelography), as well as eventual preservation of the subarachnoid space. The authors reviewed 106 cases of nontraumatic acute subdural spinal hematoma (101 published cases and five of their own) in terms of cause, diagnosis, treatment, and long-term outcome. Fifty-one patients (49%) were men and 55 (51%) were women. In 70% of patients the spinal segment involved was in the lumbar or thoracolumbar spine. In 57 cases (54%) there was a defect in the hemostatic mechanism. spinal puncture was performed in 50 patients (47%). Late surgical treatment was performed in 59 cases (56%): outcome was good in 25 cases (42%) (in 20 of these patients preoperative neurological evaluation had shown mild deficits or paraparesis, and three patients had presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH]). The outcome was poor in 34 cases (58%; 23 patients with paraplegia and 11 with SAH). The formation of nontraumatic acute spinal subdural hematomas may result from coagulation abnormalities and iatrogenic causes such as spinal puncture. Their effect on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots may be limited to a mere compressive mechanism when the subarachnoid space is preserved and the hematoma is confined between the dura and the arachnoid. It seems likely that the theory regarding the opening of the dural compartment, verified at the cerebral level, is applicable to the spinal level too. Early surgical treatment is always indicated when the patient's neurological status progressively deteriorates. The best results can be obtained in patients who do not experience SAH. In a few selected patients in whom neurological impairment is minimal, conservative treatment is possible.
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4/67. Idiopathic giant-cell granulomatous hypophysitis mimicking acute meningitis.

    A 32-year-old woman presented with severe headache, photophobia, fever, nausea, vomiting, and worsening vision. She had also noted several months of amenorrhea. She was febrile to 38.9 degrees C. Laboratory evaluation revealed a markedly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Lumbar puncture revealed a cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytic pleocytosis and an elevated protein level. Endocrine studies revealed evidence of panhypopituitarism without diabetes insipidus. A magnetic resonance imaging study showed a 2-cm pituitary mass with optic chiasmal compression. The patient had a trans-sphenoidal resection of the mass. pathology revealed multinucleated giant cells in necrotic debris, but no evidence of pituitary tumor. Studies looking for evidence of systemic granulomatous disease were negative. The patient was considered to have idiopathic giant-cell granulomatous hypophysitis. After surgery, the patient's vision improved and hormone replacement therapy was initiated. This case illustrates that idiopathic giant-cell granulomatous hypophysitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with a pituitary mass, hypopituitarism, and meningitis-like symptoms.
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5/67. Acute intracranial hemorrhage caused by acupuncture.

    A 44-year-old Chinese man developed severe occipital headache, nausea, and vomiting during acupuncture treatment of the posterior neck for chronic neck pain. Computed tomography of the head showed hemorrhage in the fourth, third, and lateral ventricles. A lumbar puncture confirmed the presence of blood. magnetic resonance angiography with gadolinium did not reveal any saccular aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. The patient's headache resolved over a period of 28 days without any neurological deficits. acupuncture of the posterior neck can cause acute intracranial hemorrhage.
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ranking = 7
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6/67. Acute cervical epidural hematoma: case report.

    A 74 year-old patient with a nocturnal onset of neck and chest pain was brought to an emergency clinic. physical examination and cardiac assessment were normal. Three hours after the addmittance, a flaccid paralysis of the four limbs supervened. Suspecting of an unusual onset of central nervous system infection, a lumbar puncture was performed, yielding 20 ml of normal cerebrospinal fluid. Thirty oinutes after the puncture, the patient completely regained neurological funcion. He was then referred to a General Hospital where a computed tomography (CT) scan was done showing a large cervical epidural bleeding in the posterolateral region of C4/C5 extending to C7/Th1, along with a C6 vertebral body hemangioma. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed the same CT findings. A normal selective angiography of vertebral arteries, carotid arteries and thyreocervical trunk was carried out. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (ASSEH) is a rare but dramatic cause of neurological impairment. In this article we report a fortunate case of complete recovery after an unusual spine cord decompression. We also review the current literature concerning diagnosis and treatment of ASSEH.
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7/67. Left atrial thrombosis after percutaneous mitral valvuloplasty: resolution with conservative management.

    We report the detection of a thrombus 72 hours after mitral valvuloplasty through the use of the technique of Inoue. Images obtained by transesophageal echocardiography revealed its localization on the interatrial septum at the level of the transseptal puncture. Although the patient subsequently underwent surgery for the placement of a prosthetic valve in mitral position due to failure of the valvuloplasty, the thrombus resolved with conservative management.
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ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
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8/67. Peripheral venopuncture as temporary vascular access in rhabdomyolysis-induced acute renal failure related to frog leaps: case report.

    rhabdomyolysis, or acute muscle destruction, may be accompanied by myoglobinemia, myoglobinuria, and an elevated serum creatine kinase level. The disorder has many potential causes, the most common one in otherwise healthy people being severe exercise. rhabdomyolysis has many complications, but the most important one is acute renal failure. We describe a man with rhabdomyolysis-induced acute renal failure occurring after frog leaps. During 3 dialytic sessions, we practiced direct puncture of peripheral veins of the antecubital fossa as temporary vascular access for this patient. His renal function improved, after which he was discharged with a smooth clinical course.
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ranking = 5
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9/67. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint due to pyonex.

    We present a case of septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint with an associated epidural abscess. A 13-year-old boy was hospitalized with acute severe back pain and fever after pyonex was done. The infection was precisely localized with magnetic resonance imaging, bone and gallium scintigraphy. He responded to antibiotic therapy. We suppose that the infection was caused by pyonex because the blood cultures were negative, and the patient had an abrupt onset of severe pain and fever 24 h after the acupuncture.
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10/67. Acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy and central nervous system involvement: nine new cases and a review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE: The authors describe nine new cases of acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (AMPPE) with associated central nervous system (CNS) involvement and permanent visual sequelae. The study includes a review of the literature and discussion of evaluation, management, and treatment options. DESIGN: Retrospective, noncomparative case series. PARTICIPANTS: Nine patients were identified with AMPPE and CNS involvement in addition to 22 patients reviewed in the literature. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A review of nine patients with AMPPE and CNS involvement was performed. charts were reviewed for age, gender, preceding viral prodromes, visual acuity, ophthalmologic examination findings, CNS findings, and treatment. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients (nine new patients) were diagnosed with AMPPE and various degrees of CNS involvement. Ages ranged from 8 to 54 years, with an average of 27 years. Twenty-one males (68%) and 10 females (32%) were identified. Eleven patients (35%) had antecedent viral illnesses. visual acuity was variable and ranged from 20/20 to count fingers. The spectrum of CNS findings ranged from headaches to sagittal sinus thrombosis. CONCLUSIONS: Acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy can be associated with CNS abnormalities and permanent visual deficits. neuroimaging, lumbar puncture, and cerebral angiography analysis provide useful diagnostic tools when CNS involvement is suspected. Intravenous corticosteroids and collaboration with neurovascular colleagues should be considered in these situations. In cases complicated by CNS arteritis, immunosuppressive agents can be a beneficial adjunct to corticosteroids.
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