Cases reported "Acute-Phase Reaction"

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1/7. Hypocomplementemic panniculitis with paraprotein.

    Two episodes of severe panniculitis accompanied by fever and an acute phase response were the main clinical features in a patient who had an unusual IgG kappa paraprotein. Both episodes responded promptly to steroids. Complement proteins of the early classical pathway were depleted in the patient's serum, and in vitro experiments indicated that the IgG kappa paraprotein activated complement directly. The association of recurrent panniculitis and paraproteinemia-hypocomplementemia has been described in 2 other patients. It should be recognized since its response to steroids is immediate.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fever
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2/7. Active infective endocarditis due to methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in the acute phase of infectious mononucleosis.

    A 26-year-old male was treated for acute hepatitis due to Epstein-Barr virus and infectious mononucleosis in our hospital. At 2 weeks after admission, there was relapse with high fever. A blood culture detected methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus. A two-dimensional echocardiogram revealed severe aortic regurgitation and vegetation on the left coronary cusp of the aortic valve. The diagnosis was active infective endocarditis due to methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in the acute phase of infectious mononucleosis. Following preoperative administration of vancomycin, the aortic valve was replaced with a Carbomedics prosthetic valve. The aortic valve was bicuspid, and the right cusp and non-coronary cusp were conjoined. As the focus of infection was localized to the left coronary cusp, the infected tissue was fully removed with resection of all the cusps. Although fever persisted long after the operation, the blood culture became negative for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, and repeated echocardiograms including transesophageal echocardiogram showed no prosthetic valve infection. vancomycin was administered until the c-reactive protein became negative at 45 days after the operation.
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ranking = 6679.1725845263
keywords = infectious mononucleosis, mononucleosis, fever
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3/7. First attack of rheumatic fever in an adult: the case for greater awareness.

    A 40 year old white woman presenting with rash, fever, and migratory polyarthralgia developed a symmetrical polyarthropathy and remained unwell for 10 weeks. Fulfilment of the revised Jones criteria reinforced the clinical diagnosis of rheumatic fever. Antistreptococcal antibodies peaked four to six weeks into the illness and declined thereafter.
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ranking = 6
keywords = fever
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4/7. antibodies to an Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen synthetic peptide in infectious mononucleosis. Report of two cases.

    The Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA-1) contains a region of repeating glycine and alanine amino acids. It has been shown that this region contains a major epitope of EBNA-1. With well-characterized sequential sera from two cases of acute infectious mononucleosis, a specific IgM response was detected to the EBNA-1 synthetic peptide by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Conversely, an IgG response was observed in the convalescent phase of the illness with a progressive decline of the IgM antibodies. This response was observed with heterophil-positive and heterophil-negative EBV/IM. The peptide-specific serologic response was confirmed by immunoblotting, the serial serum samples on extracts of EBV transformed B-cells. There was excellent correlation between the antipeptide ELISA and blotting techniques.
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ranking = 5564.3104871053
keywords = infectious mononucleosis, mononucleosis
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5/7. Suppression of fever and the acute-phase response in a patient with juvenile chronic arthritis treated with monoclonal antibody to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (cA2).

    Juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) is the commonest chronic rheumatic disorder of childhood. Although conventional therapy of JCA continues to improve, many patients experience long-term ill health as a result of their disease or treatment. In adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA), similar concerns have led to the development of therapies designed to interfere in key disease processes. One such therapy is cA2, a chimeric neutralizing monoclonal antibody to the inflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The administration of cA2 in adult RA has led to impressive short-term suppression of disease, with a good safety profile. Here, we report the first use of cA2 in childhood arthritis, choosing a patient with severe systemic-onset JCA, resistant to conventional therapies. The patient received two i.v. infusions of cA2, each at a dose of 10 mg/kg, separated by 1 week. The treatment was well tolerated and induced rapid control of fever, anorexia and serositis, together with downregulation of interleukin (IL)-6, soluble TNF receptors (sTNFR) and IL-1ra, and the acute-phase proteins c-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA). In contrast, we saw no significant improvement in joint pain or tenderness. Our findings suggest that TNF-alpha is a mediator of fever and other systemic aspects of disease in systemic JCA. TNF-alpha blockade as a treatment modality in JCA deserves further study.
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ranking = 6
keywords = fever
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6/7. Chronic aortic dissection masquerading as systemic disease.

    We report two cases of chronic aortic dissection whose prominent features were characterized by systemic symptoms (prolonged low grade fever, fatigue, weight loss) and biological acute phase response. In the first patient, a surgical repair of the descending thoracic aorta aneurysm was performed, allowing the disappearance of general manifestations, whereas spontaneous resolution occurred in the second case. Although aortic dissection is usually an acute and highly symptomatic event, the disorder can present--albeit rarely--as systemic illness and fever of unknown origin.
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ranking = 2
keywords = fever
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7/7. Increased interleukin-6 production during the acute phase of the syndrome of episodic angioedema and hypereosinophilia.

    BACKGROUND: The Gleich syndrome is rare and associates recurrent angioedema, urticaria, fever, weight gain and blood hypereosinophilia, underlying systemic and local inflammation. The pathogenesis of those symptoms remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We wanted to address the possible implication of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the development of those clinical features, and to identify the cells involved in its production. methods: A 26-year-old man suffering of this disease was referred in hospital. During an acute attack with weight gain, fever and a diffuse oedema, a marked increase in eosinophils count (42700/mm3 was observed. serum ECP was elevated at 47 microg/L (normal less than 16). Corticosteroid therapy administrated on the 7th day was followed by a rapid remission. blood samples were collected (before, during the attack and under corticosteroid therapy) for measurements of serum IL-6 (ELISA, Immunotech, Marseille, france) and plasma histamine (RIA, Immunotech, Marseille, france). blood monocytes and eosinophils were isolated and a skin biopsy was performed during the attack. RESULTS: The plasma histamine level was within normal range. The level of IL-6 in sera peaked to 74 pg/mL, concomitant with the peak of eosinophilia at the acute phase phase of the attack. Under corticosteroids, we observed a drop in the IL-6 serum level to 29 pg/mL, concomitant with the clinical remission. During the attack, an increase in IL-6 production was observed in 24 h blood monocyte supernatants (11.10(3) pg/mL compared with 2.4 /-0.8.10(3) pg/mL for BM from controls) as well as in skin endothelial cells but not in the blood and skin eosinophils. in vitro, when endothelial cells were incubated in eosinophils supernatants of the patient, liberation of IL-6 was observed (3.3 10(3) pg/mL compared with controls: 2.1 10(3) pg/mL) CONCLUSION: serum IL-6 elevation may be related to an increased production by blood monocytes and endothelial cells, possibly stimulated by eosinophil mediator during the acute phase of the disease, and might participate in the inflammatory reaction of this syndrome.
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ranking = 2
keywords = fever
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