Cases reported "Adenocarcinoma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/100. skin metastases of gynecologic adenocarcinomas affect serum levels of hCGbeta but not those of SCC antigen.

    Squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) has been shown to be elevated in patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the cervix but also in patients with benign tumors of epithelial origin and in benign skin disorders. Elevated serum levels of the free beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCGbeta) have been observed in patients with cancer of different types, and cancer aggressiveness is related to hCGbeta expression. Therefore, we expected that extensive metastatic skin dissemination of gynecologic malignancies would cause a rise in the serum levels of SCC-Ag and hCGbeta. The serum levels of SCC-Ag, hCGbeta and CA 125 were monitored in 2 patients with extensive skin dissemination of ovarian and endometrial adenocarcinoma. skin metastases had no effect on serum levels of SCC-Ag but they caused an increase in serum levels of hCGbeta. SCC-Ag is not a marker for metastatic skin lesions of gynecologic carcinomas of nonepidermoid origin. hCGbeta expression is associated with aggressiveness of cancer and may be a useful marker indicating therapy resistance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/100. Endometrial carcinoma presenting as hematometra mimicking a large pelvic cyst.

    Large pelvic cysts are commonly seen in gynecologic practice; their heterogeneous origin is reflected in their pleomorphic clinical features. We report the case of a 64-year-old multiparous postmenopausal woman with an unusual manifestation of endometrial adenocarcinoma that presented as hematometra mimicking a large pelvic cyst. In this case, hematometra was well demonstrated by transabdominal sonography, but transvaginal sonography allowed better visualization of the endometrial lining and suggested the correct diagnosis of endometrial cancer. Abnormal vaginal bleeding or hematometra in postmenopausal women should lead to assessment of the endometrial mucosa. Transvaginal sonography can be used to visualize neoplastic lesions in the endometrium when hematometra is detected through transabdominal sonography.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/100. The use of microsatellite instability in the distinction between synchronous endometrial and colonic adenocarcinomas.

    The association of endometrial carcinoma with other gynecologic neoplasms, especially ovarian and fallopian tube carcinoma, has been well documented and is usually interpreted as a result of a field defect. Sporadic synchronous primary carcinomas occurring in the endometrium and colon are extremely rare, especially in the absence of the familial genetic abnormalities seen in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) syndrome, and may present a diagnostic dilemma. Two cases of synchronous adenocarcinomas of the endometrium and colon were studied for genetic abnormalities and differences to test for the presence of two primary tumors. Primary tumors, metastases, and normal tissues were microdissected from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. PCR amplification was performed for microsatellite dna markers on chromosome 17q and 11q13. The colonic tumors were moderately and poorly differentiated, invasive, nonmucinous adenocarcinomas, whereas one uterine tumor was endometrioid adenocarcinoma and the other was papillary serous carcinoma. Although microsatellite instability, as evidenced by changes in the lengths of the amplified PCR products, was detected at 17q and 11q13 loci in the uterine and colonic neoplasms, the patterns of instability differed between the two primary tumor sites. Moreover, the lymph node metastasis in one colonic tumor had genetic alterations that differed from that of the primary tumor. In both patients, the molecular studies suggested the presence of two synchronous primary tumors. Molecular techniques may assist in distinguishing two separate primaries by determining the contraction and expansion of microsatellite regions in dna obtained by microdissection from the primary tumors and associated metastases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/100. Post-hysterectomy fallopian tube carcinoma presenting with a positive Papanicolaou smear.

    BACKGROUND: Fallopian tube carcinoma is a rare gynecologic malignancy. The majority of women present with vaginal bleeding and have advanced disease. CASE: A 76-year-old woman presented 34 years after vaginal hysterectomy with a routine Papanicolaou smear showing adenocarcinoma. Rectovaginal examination was remarkable for thickening at the vaginal apex. colposcopy found a pinpoint opening in this area, and a cytobrush passed through the opening confirmed adenocarcinoma. Pelvic ultrasound, computed tomography scan, and CA 125 were normal. At laparotomy, the right fallopian tube and ovary were adherent to the vaginal apex. A grade II papillary serous adenocarcinoma confined to the tube was discovered. CONCLUSION: According to a medline search, this is the third report detailing a unique presentation of fallopian tube carcinoma after hysterectomy and possibly the first detected with positive Papanicolaou cytology.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/100. Small-bowel angiosarcoma after pelvic irradiation: a report of two cases.

    Angiosarcoma is a rare tumor in the small bowel. Several predisposing factors have been suggested, including external irradiation for another malignancy. Only six cases of small-bowel angiosarcoma in patients previously treated with pelvic irradiation for gynecological malignancies have been reported hitherto. We present here two patients in whom a diagnosis of small-bowel angiosarcoma was made 10 years or more after intrapelvic irradiation. These cases demonstrate poor prognosis in this disease. Although postirradiation angiosarcoma is a rare condition, its possibility should be kept in mind when operating on previously irradiated patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/100. Primary appendiceal malignancy mimicking advanced stage ovarian carcinoma: a case series.

    BACKGROUND: Primary appendiceal malignancy metastatic to the ovaries is a rare condition that may mimic late stage ovarian cancer. This condition is rarely diagnosed preoperatively. CASES: Three patients referred to our institution from 1994 to 1999 for presumed late stage ovarian cancer were found to have primary appendiceal adenocarcinoma, adenocarcinoid, and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma metastatic to the ovaries at laparotomy. We describe the clinical course of these patients and review the relevant literature. CONCLUSION: It is important for the gynecologic oncologist to be aware of the clinicopathological features and surgical management of these malignancies, as the incidence, prognosis, and recommended treatment vary with histological subtype.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/100. Port-site metastasis after laparoscopic surgery for gynecologic cancer. A report of six cases.

    BACKGROUND: Port-site metastasis after laparoscopic surgery for gynecologic cancer is a recognized entity. CASES: Five patients underwent laparoscopic peritoneal biopsies for a stage III (n = 4) or IV (n = 1) ovarian cancer with moderate or poor differentiation. The sixth patient underwent a laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for vaginal carcinoma with bulky metastatic pelvic lymph nodes. CONCLUSION: In order to avoid port-site metastasis, patients with an obviously malignant ovarian tumor and ascites should not be treated with laparoscopy using pneumoperitoneum. If a malignant ovarian tumor is discovered during laparoscopy, the interval between initial surgery and complete cytoreductive surgery (with resection of laparoscopic ports) followed by chemotherapy should be as short as possible. For patients with uterine cancer and bulky nodes, laparoscopic lymphadenectomy should be avoided to avoid trocar implantation metastasis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/100. Bilateral diffuse uveal melanocytic proliferation associated with extraocular cancers: review of a process particularly associated with gynecologic cancers.

    We reviewed cases of a paraneoplastic syndrome in which uveal melanocytes proliferated and led to blindness. Eighteen cases were derived from the literature, and two were taken from our institution. The average patient age at the time of the diagnosis was 63 years (range, 34-89 years). There were 13 women and 7 men. In approximately half of the cases, the ocular symptoms antedated those of the inciting tumor. Most of the inciting tumors were poorly differentiated carcinomas. The most common tumors were from the female genital tract (ovary and uterus) among the women patients and from the lung among the men. Tumors from the breast were rare (one possible case), and tumors of the prostate were conspicuously absent. All five inciting tumors whose histopathology was reviewed expressed neuron-specific enolase, but none prominently expressed antigens more specific for neuroendocrine carcinomas such as chromogranin or synaptophysin. It is our experience that many general pathologists are not aware of this unique paraneoplastic syndrome. Our report is the first to document a statistically significant association between this syndrome and gynecologic cancers.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/100. Anti-Yo antibodies and cerebellar degeneration in a man with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus.

    serum antibodies to the Yo antigen are usually associated with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration arising in female patients with gynecological or breast malignancy and are rarely associated with other tumors. We report a male patient who presented with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration and anti-Yo antibodies following removal of an esophageal adenocarcinoma. This is only the third report of anti-Yo antibodies occurring in a male patient. The Yo antigen was expressed by the esophageal tumor but not in a frontal lobe cerebral metastasis identified at postmortem. Interestingly, CD8 T-cell infiltration was also found in the tumor, but not in the metastasis, consistent with down-regulation of Yo expression by the tumor cells leading to evasion from immune-mediated tumor surveillance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/100. Radical abdominal trachelectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy with uterine conservation and subsequent pregnancy in the treatment of early invasive cervical cancer.

    BACKGROUND: Recently, pregnancies in patients after radical vaginal trachelectomy and laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy have been reported. Radical abdominal trachelectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy with uterine conservation has been previously described; however, subsequent outcome and pregnancy has not. methods: Three patients with cervical carcinoma, 1 with stage IA1 with lymph-vascular space invasion and 2 with stage IA2, were treated with radical abdominal trachelectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy with uterine conservation. RESULTS: All patients underwent the planned procedure with no significant intraoperative or postoperative complications. All patients had return to normal menstrual function. One patient had a successful pregnancy delivered at 39 weeks by cesarean section and is now subsequently pregnant with a second pregnancy. CONCLUSION: Radical abdominal trachelectomy is a technically feasible operation that uses operative techniques familiar to the American-trained gynecologic oncologist and results in wider parametrial resection than radical vaginal trachelectomy. In young patients desiring to retain fertility, successful pregnancies after radical abdominal trachelectomy are possible. Intraoperative and postoperative complications are likely to be lower with an abdominal versus a vaginal approach. Long-term survival of patients treated with radical trachelectomy for early invasive cervical cancer are yet to be determined.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Adenocarcinoma'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.