Cases reported "Adenocarcinoma"

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1/1497. brain metastasis from prostatic carcinoma.

    Between 1959 and 1971 there were 91 patients with clinically diagnosed prostatic carcinoma who were autopsied at Roswell Park Memorial Institute. In four of these 91 (4.4%) intracerebral metastasis were found at autopsy, but only in one of these four was the diagnosis arrived at pre-mortem. This report describes the diagnosis and management of intracerebral metastasis from prostate carcinoma. It appears, on the basis of our initial experience, that the clinical diagnosis of this entity deserves more frequent consideration.
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2/1497. Mandibular metastasis in a patient with endometrial cancer.

    Gynecologic cancers metastatic to bone are a rare entity, and a metastasis to the mandible at initial presentation is even more infrequently seen. We present a case of a 71-year-old woman with stage IV endometrial cancer with a metastasis to the mandible, with no other sites of distal spread apparent. The endometrial tumor was a FIGO grade III adenocarcinoma. The pathologic evaluation of the mandibular lesion revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with focal squamous differentiation. She was treated with a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, radiation therapy to the mandible, and chemotherapy consisting of Taxol and carboplatin for six cycles. She had a complete response, but 10 months after the original diagnosis developed spinal cord compression and progressive disease in the pelvis. patients in good clinical condition with a single bone metastasis should be treated aggressively, as survival can be extended.
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keywords = metastasis
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3/1497. A case of leptomeningeal metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for carcinoembryonic antigen.

    A case of leptomeningeal metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma is reported. In this case, we evaluated the feasibility of reverse transcriptased polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods to detect cancer cells in cerebrospinal fluids (CSF). Messenger rna of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was clearly demonstrated in CSF by reverse RT-PCR methods. An immunohistochemical study also demonstrated that tumor cells were stained positive with anti-CEA antibody. This case suggests that RT-PCR for CEA was a sensitive and useful method to diagnose leptomeningeal metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma.
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4/1497. An extrahepatic bile duct metastasis from a gallbladder cancer mimicking Mirizzi's syndrome.

    We report a case of an extrahepatic bile duct metastasis from a gallbladder cancer that mimicked Mirizzi's syndrome on cholangiography. A 67-yr-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of acute calculous cholecystitis. As obstructive jaundice developed after the admission, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed to ameliorate the jaundice and to evaluate the biliary system. Tube cholangiography revealed bile duct obstruction at the hepatic hilus, and extrinsic compression of the lateral aspect of the common hepatic duct, with nonvisualization of the gallbladder. No impacted cystic duct stone was visualized on CT or ultrasonography. laparotomy revealed a gallbladder tumor as well as an extrahepatic bile duct tumor. We diagnosed that the latter was a metastasis from the gallbladder cancer, based on the histopathological features. This case is unique in that the extrahepatic bile duct metastasis obstructed both the common hepatic duct and the cystic duct, giving the appearance of Mirizzi's syndrome on cholangiography. Metastatic bile duct tumors that mimic Mirizzi's syndrome have not been previously reported. The presence of this condition should be suspected in patients with the cholangiographic features of Mirizzi's syndrome, when the CT or ultrasonographic findings fail to demonstrate an impacted cystic duct stone.
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5/1497. Spontaneous remission of solitary bony metastasis after removal of the primary kidney adenocarcinoma.

    The second case of spontaneous remission of a biopsy-proved osseous metastasis from a renal carcinoma is reported. The unusual feature of the patient presenting with a right varicocele and no hematuria is extremely rare.
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6/1497. Ileal metastasis in cervical carcinoma: a case report.

    A patient with adenosquamous carcinoma of the uterine cervix, who presented with partial intestinal obstruction and a macroscopically normal cervix, is reported. The literature is reviewed.
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7/1497. Unexpected gallbladder cancer after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: an emerging problem? Reflections on four cases.

    gallbladder cancer (GC) has been reported in 0.3-1.5% of cholecystectomies. Since the introduction of laparoscopic surgery, cholecystectomies have increased and occult GC may therefore be more frequent. Herein we analyze our own experience to determine whether there was an increase in GC. We also evaluate the risk factors for this outcome. Four patients with GC undiagnosed before surgery (four of 602 cases, or 0.66%) were submitted to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The percentage in patients who underwent open surgery was 0.28% (two of 714 cases). Without reoperation, three patients died in the laparoscopic group and one is alive at 12 months. Trocar site metastasis was not observed. Although the percentage of GC (0.28% versus 0.66%) increased, the percentage is still in the referred average. Undiagnosed GC is on the increase. Examination of the gallbladder and a frozen section, if necessary, are recommended. Calcified gallbladders, age >70 years, a long history of stones, and a thickened gallbladder all represent significant risk factors.
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8/1497. Middle ear adenocarcinoma with intracranial extension. Case report.

    Middle ear adenocarcinoma is a very rare, locally invasive neoplasm assumed to arise from the middle ear mucosa. Although endolymphatic sac tumor (aggressive papillary middle ear tumor) and jugulotympanic paraganglioma may show brain invasion, intracranial extension of histologically confirmed middle ear adenocarcinoma has not been previously reported. The authors describe a 53-year-old man who suffered from otalgia and tinnitus for more than 10 years and from neurological deficits for 1 year due to a large temporal bone tumor that invaded the temporal lobe. A combined neurosurgical and otolaryngological resection was performed. Pathological analysis revealed a low-grade adenocarcinoma of a mixed epithelial-neuroendocrine phenotype, which showed a close histological similarity to, and topographical relationship with, middle ear epithelium. The authors conclude that middle ear adenocarcinoma belongs to the spectrum of extracranial tumors that have possible local extension to the brain.
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keywords = lymphatic
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9/1497. Well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, gastric foveolar type, of the extrahepatic bile ducts: A previously unrecognized and distinctive morphologic variant of bile duct carcinoma.

    Two examples of a rare but distinctive morphologic variant of extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the extrahepatic bile ducts are reported. One tumor arose in the common bile duct of a 51-year-old man; the other arose in the common hepatic duct of a 27-year-old man. Both tumors were composed predominantly (>95%) of gastric foveolar-type epithelium. Because of their bland nuclear features, low mitotic index, and focal polypoid and lobular architecture, they were initially confused with adenomas. Foci of less-differentiated adenocarcinoma and perineural invasion present in the deep portions of the tumors facilitated recognition. The neoplastic cells and extracellular mucin were periodic acid-Schiff- and alcian blue-positive. By immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells expressed cytokeratins 8 and 20 as well as cathepsin d, as reported in normal foveolar cells. Likewise, p53 overexpression was documented immunohistochemically in both adenocarcinomas, which also stained with the Ki-67 antibody. Despite the well-differentiated nature of the neoplasms and their deceptively benign microscopic appearance, one patient developed recurrence and liver metastasis 5 years after surgery. The other patient is disease-free 2 years following a segmental resection of the common hepatic duct, cystic duct, and gallbladder. The cell phenotype of these tumors can be explained by the ability of the bile duct epithelium to differentiate along gastric cell lines.
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10/1497. lung carcinoma presenting as metastasis to intracranial meningioma: case report and review of the literature.

    Tumor-to-tumor metastasis is rare. The authors report a case of a 52-year-old man with a 1-year history of a right parasaggital meningioma, whose clinical signs were consistent with enlarging meningioma. In preparation for surgery, the routine preoperative chest radiograph revealed a lung mass. Fine-needle aspiration of the mass revealed adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent surgical excision of the intracranial mass, which was thought to be a meningioma. However, pathologic examination revealed a transitional meningioma extensively infiltrated with deposits of metastatic carcinoma from the patient's primary lung tumor. Metastasis to meningioma was therefore responsible for the rapid enlargement of the long-standing meningioma, and caused the first clinical manifestation of primary lung carcinoma. Recurrent metastasis developed at the surgical site 5 weeks later, requiring surgical excision and postoperative radiation to prevent further recurrence. This is a highly unusual presentation for lung carcinoma and, to the authors' best knowledge, is the first such case reported. A review of the published literature revealed 20 other cases of lung carcinoma metastatic to meningioma, which were incidentally discovered on surgery or autopsy.
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