Cases reported "Adenoma, Islet Cell"

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1/74. Ultrasound-guided laparoscopic resection of pancreatic islet cell tumors.

    Pancreatic islet cell tumors represent a diverse group of neuroendocrine lesions. These tumors may be singular or multiple, benign or malignant, sporadic, or part of the constellation of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Tumors such as insulinomas and gastrinomas produce gastrointestinal peptides that lead to diagnosis. Nonfunctioning lesions may be found incidentally or by screening patients at high risk for such tumors. Successful management of patients with pancreatic islet cell tumors relies on accurate localization and sound operative technique. With proper preoperative localization, advanced laparoscopic methods can be used to manage patients with these pancreatic neoplasms. Preoperative localization of pancreatic islet cell tumors was difficult in the past. Standard imaging and localizing modalities, such as computed tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, transabdominal sonography, and portal venous sampling, yield only 24% to 75% accuracy. Consequently, many biochemically suspected lesions cannot be imaged with current techniques. Decreased tactile sensation of laparoscopy adds complexity to intraoperative identification. Endoscopic sonography and laparoscopic sonography provide accurate preoperative and intraoperative localization to enhance laparoscopic and open resection. The authors treated two patients with islet cell neoplasms using endoscopic sonography to preoperatively visualize the tumors and laparoscopic sonography to guide laparoscopic enucleation. Their approach and difficulties are discussed.
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keywords = operative
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2/74. Nonfunctioning endocrine tumor of the pancreas with extrapancreatic growth and cyst formation: report of a case.

    We report a case of nonfunctioning endocrine tumor of the pancreas with extrapancreatic growth and cyst formation. A 48-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with an upper abdominal mass, which was detected during a routine medical checkup. The preoperative diagnosis was a solid cystic tumor of the pancreas. The tumor, which measured about 7cm in diameter, arose from the head of the pancreas and had a thin stalk, measuring about 1 cm in diameter. The histopathological diagnosis was a malignant nonfunctioning endocrine tumor of the pancreas. Cyst formation occurred in 67% of the reported cases with extrapancreatic growth in japan. It is speculated that the cyst formation in this disease is related to the large size of the tumor and to the extrapancreatic growth.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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3/74. Hypercalcitoninemia in a sporadic asymptomatic neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreatic tail.

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Asymptomatic neuroendocrine tumors of the gastroenteropancreatic tract represent a significant challenge in terms of postoperative monitoring. methods: A case report of a calcitonin-secreting asymptomatic neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreatic tail is presented. RESULTS: Hypercalcitoninemia was noted in the 76-year-old Caucasian man who had a recurrent neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreatic tail. Upon pentagastrin stimulation, basal calcitonin increased only moderately from 82.3 (<10) to 100.9 and 125 pg/ml after 2 and 5 min, respectively. Surgical removal of the neuroendocrine tumor resulted in postoperative normalization of both basal and stimulated serum calcitonin levels. On immunohistochemistry, the neuroendocrine tumor was positive for calcitonin. CONCLUSION: Routine measurements of serum calcitonin might be a highly sensitive adjunct capable of identifying a subset of neuroendocrine tumors in which calcitonin monitoring may aid in the early detection of postoperative recurrence.
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ranking = 0.42857142857143
keywords = operative
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4/74. Sonographic diagnosis of pancreatic islet cell tumor: value of intermittent harmonic imaging.

    We describe a case of nonfunctioning islet cell tumor of the pancreas diagnosed preoperatively by intermittent harmonic power Doppler imaging and digital subtraction gray-scale harmonic imaging and the use of the contrast agent SH U 508A (Levovist). Hypervascularity and tumor perfusion were clearly demonstrated with both harmonic imaging techniques in the early arterial phase. Sonographic findings were confirmed by other modalities and by histopathologic examination.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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5/74. Cystic islet cell tumors of the pancreas. A clinico-pathological report of two nonfunctioning cases and review of the literature.

    Cystic islet cell tumors of the pancreas are extremely rare. The authors report their personal experience with two cases of nonfunctioning cystic endocrine neoplasms. The tumor was diagnosed preoperatively in one case by ultrasonography (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology, while in the other it was identified only in the surgical specimen after a clinical-radiologic diagnosis of pancreatic mucinous cystic tumor. Immunohistochemical assay showed positivity for the generic neuroendocrine markers (neuron specific enolase, or NSE, synaptophysin, and chromogranin a) in both cases and also for glucagon in one case. The neoplasms were resected by distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and intermediate pancreatectomy respectively. Both patients are alive and recurrence-free 6 mo and 2.5 yr, respectively, after surgery. The authors also review the existing literature, discussing the pathogenesis of such tumors and the imaging techniques and surgical strategies adopted in their management.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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6/74. A 20-year review of pediatric pancreatic tumors.

    Pancreatic tumors are rare surgical problems in infants and children. A 20-year audit (1971 to 1991) of this institution showed six patients ranging in age from 3 weeks to 16 years who were operated on for pancreatic neoplasms. Five of these tumors were malignant, bringing the reported experience to 71 cases. This series of malignancies included three solid cystic tumors, one insulin-secreting tumor, and one pancreatoblastoma. The clinical presentations varied: three had abdominal pain, one developed hypoglycemia, and one had an abdominal mass with jaundice. In five of the six patients pancreatic pathology was suspected preoperatively. All were treated primarily with pancreatic resection including one pancreatoduodenectomy. No radiotherapy or chemotherapy was used. The perioperative mortality was 0% with a morbidity of 50%. The long-term results are encouraging, with all patients alive after a mean follow-up of 7.8 years. These data suggest that aggressive surgical therapy is warranted in the management of pediatric pancreatic tumors.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = operative
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7/74. A wolf in sheep's clothing: a non-functioning islet cell tumor of the pancreas masquerading as a microcystic (serous cystic) adenoma.

    CONTEXT: The endosonographic appearance of a microcystic "honeycomb" lesion of the pancreas usually indicates a serous cystic adenoma. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a non-functioning islet cell tumor that has the typical microcystic "honeycomb" appearance of a serous cystic adenoma. The implications for endoscopic ultrasound diagnosis and management of cystic pancreatic lesions are discussed. CONCLUSION: Islet cell tumors are a rare differential diagnosis of microcystic pancreatic lesions. If fine needle aspiration remains non-diagnostic preoperative distinction from serous cystic adenomas may be impossible.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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8/74. Curative resection for a pancreatic endocrine carcinoma involving the portal vein.

    A 68-year-old male was admitted to our hospital for worsening of diabetes mellitus. Abdominal computed tomography showed a well-enhanced tumor in the head of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed tapering obstruction of the main pancreatic duct and stricture of the common bile duct. Celiac angiography demonstrated a vague tumor stain. Percutaneous transhepatic portography disclosed stricture of the portal vein. pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with segmental resection and reconstruction of the portal vein was performed under a diagnosis of nonfunctioning endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. Histological examination demonstrated that the tumor was composed of small nests and cords of cuboidal cells with nodal invasion, and was proven to be nonfunctioning endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. Microscopically, the tumor invaded the portal vein, common bile duct and main pancreatic duct. The postoperative course was uneventful, and he is now well without any evidence of recurrent disease 14 months after surgery.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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9/74. Treating perforated jejunal ulcer, a complication in the zollinger-ellison syndrome.

    What is considered to represent the fourth case of perforated jejunal ulcer in association with the zollinger-ellison syndrome reported in the literature is discussed. Although documented in the original paper by Zollinger and Ellison, this remains a notably rare complication. Generalized peritonitis and related pathophysiological phenomena make initial definitive correction of the ulcer diathesis an extremely riskly undertaking and ill-advised. We submit that primary ulcer resection followed by total gastrectomy when the patient becomes a more suitable operative risk is the preferred method of management. The literature would appear to support this clinical view.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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10/74. hypoglycemia in diabetics.

    hypoglycemia in diabetes can be divided into 1) spontaneous hypoglycemic reactions due to absolute or relative overproduction of endogenous insulin or some other blood glucose-lowering substance, as in islet cell adenoma or carcinoma, latent or protodiabetic conditions, (extrapancreatic) tumors and pituitary and/or adrenal disorders; and 2) hypoglycemia caused by exogenous, i.e. therapeutic, measures. The problem of hypoglycemia in insulin-treated diabetics is far from being solved. As revealed by continuous blood glucose monitoring, nocturnal hypoglycemic attacks frequently escape attention especially in juvenile diabetics. Circadian variations in peripheral glucose utilization, rather than changes in plasma insulin activity, are likely to be involved in this mechanism. At least, this was the conclusion drawn from studies carried out by means of a glucose-controlled insulin and glucose infusion system (GCIGIS) -or artificial pancreas-which delivers short-acting insulin and glucose on demand intravenously. Hypoglycemic reactions in patients being treated with oral anti-diabetic agents, on the other hand, should be regarded primarily as one of the side reactions intrinsic to the mechanism of action of some of these drugs, e.g. sulfonylureas, which act mainly via stimulation of secretion of endogenous insulin reserves not responding properly to postprandial blood glucose increments. In the case of glibenclamide, at least partial resensitization of the defective glucose receptor of the beta-cell also becomes operative. A higher incidence of a characteristic type of hypoglycemic reaction was observed soon after glibenclamide therapy was introduced. Better understanding of the drug and dissemination of the information about it to doctors and patients has reduced the number of hypoglycemic reactions caused by glibenclamide to the same proportions as for other sulfonylureas. Hypoglyoemia following therapeutic hypophysectomy retains its position as one of the main hazards of this heroic therapy.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = operative
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