Cases reported "Adenoma"

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1/476. The elevated serum alkaline phosphatase--the chase that led to two endocrinopathies and one possible unifying diagnosis.

    A 39-year-old Chinese man with hypertension being evaluated for elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) levels was found to have an incidental right adrenal mass. The radiological features were characteristic of a large adrenal myelolipoma. This mass was resected and the diagnosis confirmed pathologically. His blood pressure normalised after removal of the myelolipoma, suggesting that the frequently observed association between myelolipomas and hypertension may not be entirely coincidental. Persistent elevation of the SAP levels and the discovery of hypercalcaemia after surgery led to further investigations which confirmed primary hyperparathyroidism due to a parathyroid adenoma. The patient's serum biochemistry normalised after removal of the adenoma. The association of adrenal myelolipoma with primary hyperparathyroidism has been reported in the literature only once previously. Although unconfirmed by genetic studies this association may possibly represent an unusual variation of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = adrenal
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2/476. Carcinoma of the thyroid gland, adenoma of the adrenal cortex and peptic ulcer: an unreported association.

    A 39-year-old man, operated on for duodenal ulcer, was found to have a papillary carcinoma of the thyroid, an aldosterone-producing adenoma of the adrenal cortex, and a recurrence of a peptic ulcer. The probable coincidental occurrence of these diseases in this patient is suggested. Nevertheless, careful investigation of the other endocrine glands in patients with endocrine tumors is recommended.
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ranking = 7.9780946923096
keywords = adrenal cortex, adrenal, cortex
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3/476. A case of aldosterone-producing adenoma with severe postoperative hyperkalemia.

    It is known that some patients with primary aldosteronism show postoperative hyperkalemia, which is due to inability of the adrenal gland to secrete sufficient amounts of aldosterone. However, hyperkalemia is generally neither severe nor prolonged, in which replacement therapy with mineralocorticoid is seldom necessary. We report a case of a 46-year-old woman with an aldosterone-producing adenoma associated with severe postoperative hyperkalemia. After unilateral adrenalectomy, the patient showed episodes of severe hyperkalemia for four months, which required not only cation-exchange resin, but also mineralocorticoid replacement. plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) was low, although PAC was increased after rapid ACTH test. Histological examination indicated the presence of adrenocortical tumor and paradoxical hyperplasia of zona glomerulosa in the adjacent adrenal. immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the enzymes involved in aldosterone synthesis, such as cholesterol side chain cleavage (P-450scc), 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD), and 21-hydroxylase (P-450c21), or the enzyme involved in glucocorticoid synthesis, 11beta-hydroxylase (P-450c11beta), were expressed in the tumor, but they were completely absent in zona glomerulosa of the adjacent adrenal. These findings were consistent with the patterns of primary aldosteronism. serum potassium level was gradually decreased with concomitant increase in PAC. These results suggest that severe postoperative hyperkalemia of the present case was attributable to severe suppression of aldosterone synthesis in the adjacent and contralateral adrenal, which resulted in slow recovery of aldosterone secretion. It is plausible that aldosterone synthesis of adjacent and contralateral adrenal glands is severely impaired in some cases with primary aldosteronism, as glucocorticoid synthesis in cushing syndrome.
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ranking = 2
keywords = adrenal
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4/476. Adrenal hemorrhage diagnosed by ultrasonically-guided biopsy.

    Adrenal hemorrhage in adults is an uncommon disease and is usually associated with systemic diseases, trauma or anticoagulation. When adrenal hemorrhage is discovered in chronic course without any suggestive clinical settings, it is difficult to distinguish adrenal hemorrhage correctly before surgical resection. We present a case of adrenal hemorrhage which was incidentally detected as an adrenal mass and was successfully treated in a conservative way based upon histopathological findings obtained by ultrasonically guided biopsy.
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ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = adrenal
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5/476. Hazards of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for Conn's adenoma. When enthusiasm turns to tragedy.

    A 74-year-old man with primary aldosteronism had a small tumor (27 x 23 mm) of his right adrenal gland successfully removed by a transperitoneal laparoscopy. Despite absence of malignancy in the resected tumor and complete relief of all symptoms in the immediate postoperative period, recurrence occurred 6 months later. The tumor behaved as a carcinoma spread in the peritoneal cavity, and the patient eventually died with peritoneal carcinomatosis. We suggest that the laparoscopic technique coupled with pneumoperitoneum may have favored this recurrence.
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ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = adrenal
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6/476. hypertension and virilization caused by a unique desoxycorticosterone- and androgen-secreting adrenal adenoma.

    We describe a rare androgen and desoxycorticosterone (DOC)-secreting adrenal tumor in a non-Cushingoid 14 year-old Haitian girl with secondary amenorrhea, hypertension and virilization. Her steroid pattern simulated an 11 beta-hydroxylation defect with notable elevation of adrenal androgens, 11-desoxycortisol (S), DOC, 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone and pregnenelone. Exogenous ACTH stimulated steroidogenesis. A CAT scan unfortunately failed to delineate an adrenal mass. dexamethasone (DEX) was administered, therefore, which partially suppressed androgen levels, reduced DOC and S by 80% and 82% respectively, and normalized blood pressure. Nevertheless, the response to glucocorticoid was incomplete and an MRI was obtained, which revealed a right adrenal tumor. Post surgery, the patient promptly resumed menses and became normotensive. This case illustrates that ACTH and DEX cannot reliably differentiate tumor from hyperplasia, whereas the simultaneous increase of delta 4 and delta 5 steroids, present here, may favor a tumor. This case also allows speculation that the hypersecretion of DOC may result from inhibition of 11 beta-hydroxylase activity by excess androgens. The importance of appropriate imaging for diagnosis is underscored.
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ranking = 2.6666666666667
keywords = adrenal
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7/476. Adrenal adenoma with foci of oncocytes in a patient with pre-Cushing's syndrome.

    A case of unilateral adrenal adenoma with foci of oncocytes in a 64-year-old woman is reported. The tumour manifested clinically pre-Cushing's syndrome with autonomous steroidogenesis which was insufficient to cause typical features of Cushing's syndrome. Whether the pathogenesis of oncocytes and adenoma cells, which were thought to have some metabolic deficiency in the present tumour, are linked remains to be determined.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = adrenal
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8/476. Paroxysmal tachycardia and hypertension with or without ventricular fibrillation during laparoscopic adrenalectomy: two case reports in patients with noncatecholamine-secreting adrenocortical adenomas.

    We present two cases of sudden unanticipated cardiovascular complications in patients with noncatecholamine-secreting adrenocortical adenomas during laparoscopic adrenalectomy. In the first case, the patient developed paroxysmal tachycardia and hypertension followed by ventricular fibrillation shortly after clipping of the adrenal vein. In the second case, the patient suffered hypertension and bigeminy during manipulation of the adrenal gland just around the adrenal vein. awareness of such complications during either conventional or laparoscopic adrenalectomy is important even if the operation is performed in a patient with an apparently noncatecholamine-secreting adrenocortical adenoma.
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ranking = 3
keywords = adrenal
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9/476. A patient with preclinical Cushing's syndrome and excessive DHEA-S secretion having unilateral adrenal carcinoma and contralateral adenoma.

    We report a case of preclinical Cushing's syndrome in a 54-year-old male associated with bilateral adrenocortical tumours. Physical findings and general laboratory data were unremarkable except for mild hypertension (158/90 mmHg) and impaired glucose tolerance. Endocrinological evaluation revealed the presence of autonomous cortisol secretion including unsuppressible serum cortisol by 8 mg dexamethasone test (11 microg/dl), high serum DHEA-S (3580 ng/ml, normal: 400-3500) and increased urinary 17-KS excretion (31.0-35.8 mg/day, normal: 5.8-21.3). CT scan demonstrated the presence of tumours in both adrenals and bilateral adrenalectomy was subsequently performed. Histological examination of the resected specimens revealed an adrenocortical carcinoma on the right side and an adenoma on the left side with noticeable cortical atrophy in non-neoplastic adrenals. Immunohistochemical study of steroidogenic enzymes demonstrated that all the steroidogenic enzymes involved in cortisol biosynthesis were expressed in both right and left adrenal tumours. Enzymatic activities of 21, 17alpha, 18, 11beta-hydroxylases were detected in both right and left adrenals except for the absence of 11beta-hydroxylase activity in the left adrenal adenoma. Results of in vitro tissue steroidogenesis examined in short-term tissue culture of the specimens revealed no significant differences between carcinoma and adenoma in cortisol production, but the production of adrenal androgens in carcinoma was significantly higher than that in adenoma, which may indicate the importance of evaluating adrenal androgen levels in patients with adrenocortical neoplasms.
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ranking = 4
keywords = adrenal
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10/476. A case of acromegaly accompanied by adrenal preclinical Cushing's syndrome.

    We encountered a 58-year-old woman with acromegaly accompanied by a cortisol-secreting adrenal tumor without clinical features of hypercortisolism. The simultaneous occurrence of these two endocrinopathies in one individual is extremely rare. She was diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus 8 years ago. Afterwards, in spite of insulin therapy, her hyperglycemia could not be well controlled. Her acromegaly and preclinical Cushing's syndrome were histopathologically proven to be due to a pituitary adenoma and an adrenocortical adenoma, respectively. Successful treatment for these endocrinopathies resulted in greatly improved blood sugar control because of a reduction in insulin resistance. In this case of preclinical Cushing's syndrome, replacement therapy with glucocorticoid was able to be discontinued at only 8 weeks after adrenalectomy, so that the period of necessary replacement was much shorter than that for overt Cushing's syndrome. This is the first report describing insulin resistance before and after treatment in a case of acromegaly accompanied by adrenal preclinical Cushing's syndrome.
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ranking = 2.3333333333333
keywords = adrenal
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