Cases reported "Adenoma"

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1/648. Interesting radiologic findings in suprasellar mass lesions. Report of three cases.

    The authors report three quite rare lesions of the sellar/parasellar region. They are namely; pituitary abscess, cystic macroadenoma and osteochondroma. In none of the cases, the preoperative diagnostic priority was not same as the final histopathologic diagnosis. The radiologic findings of these pathologies are discussed with emphasis on differential diagnosis.
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2/648. A huge pancreatic cystic adenoma misdiagnosed as an ovarian cyst.

    pancreatic cyst mimicking an ovarian cyst ultrasonographically has not yet been reported. We report an elderly woman with such a huge pancreatic cyst whose initial presentation was low abdominal pain. Ultrasound showed a hypoechoic cyst measuring 13.6 x 13.2 x 11.8 cm occupying pelvic cavity. She received laparotomy under the impression of ovarian cyst. Interestingly, the cyst was found to have originated from the pancreas. Total cyst excision was performed and pathologic report was pancreatic microadenoma. The patient's postoperative course was unremarkable.
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3/648. A large intrathoracic parathyroid adenoma.

    A case is described in which an unusually large parathyroid adenoma was visible on the plain chest radiograph taken during the investigation of hypercalcaemia. This was diagnosed preoperatively and a scheme is suggested whereby such a disgnosis can now readily be made. The differential diagnosis is discussed ant the literature is reviewed.
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4/648. Localization of the nonpalpable colonic lesion with intraoperative ultrasound.

    Localization of an nonpalpable colonic lesion at the time of colectomy usually requires intraoperative colonoscopy. The use of ultrasound to locate the lesion has not been described. A soft bowel clamp is placed above the expected location of the lesion and a catheter placed in the anus. Saline is then instilled into the colon and rectum. The lesion is located by ultrasound scan of the fluid filled colon with the probe placed on the serosal surface. Refinement of the technique was performed on resected colonic specimens. An in vivo trial was then performed with rapid and accurate localization of the lesion for resection. Intraoperative ultrasound of the colon can accurately localize nonpalpable colonic lesions and is an alternative to currently available techniques of localization.
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ranking = 6
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5/648. Microcystic adenoma of the pancreas: cytologic appearance on percutaneous and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration: report of a case.

    Microcystic adenoma is an uncommon neoplasm of the pancreas usually affecting older people. Its histologic features have been well characterized. The cytologic appearance of this tumor has been described only rarely, however, Microcystic adenomas may enlarge considerably and often produce symptoms related to their compression to adjacent anatomic structures. The fact that this neoplasm is almost always benign indicates the need for accurate preoperative diagnosis to differentiate it from other, more common, malignant or potentially malignant tumors of the pancreas. We present a case of pancreatic microcystic adenoma initially diagnosed by percutaneous image-guided fine-needle aspiration cytologic examination and core biopsy and further evaluated by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration on follow-up. This case report illustrates that microcystic adenoma of the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by aspiration cytology. Fine-needle aspiration--percutaneous, guided by computerized tomography, or endoscopically guided by ultrasonography--constitutes a reliable and cost-efficient diagnostic tool associated with minimal trauma to the patient.
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6/648. Signet ring cell adenoma of the thyroid with mucin predominance.

    A 22-year-old male presented with a 1-year history of a right anterior neck mass. He did not have gastrointestinal cancer. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated serum thyroglobulin level of 120 ng/mL. The neck lesion showed poor uptake on 99mTc scan, but enhanced uptake on 201T1 scan. The patient underwent a hemithyroidectomy; the cut surface of the 7 x 3.5 cm lesion was solid and tanned orange. Postoperatively the serum thyroglobulin level decreased to 26 ng/mL. microscopy of the tumor showed signet ring cells and microfollides, both of which were positive for mucicarmin and alcian blue. A small percentage of the follicles were positive for thyroglobulin and periodic acid-Schiff. Our literature search detected 18 patients with signet ring cell lesions positive for thyroglobulin, but none had characteristics similar to ours showing predominance of mucin and poor staining for thyroglobulin.
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7/648. Dorsum sellae meningioma mimicking pituitary macroadenoma: case report.

    BACKGROUND: A dorsum sellae meningioma is a rare occurrence. It is difficult to evaluate dorsum sellae meningiomas preoperatively from the viewpoint of neuroimaging. We report a rare case of dorsum sellae meningioma mimicking pituitary macroadenoma in a 73-year-old woman. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient presented with bitemporal hemianopsia and panhypopituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a bright, homogeneously enhancing intra- and suprasellar mass and a hypointense region in this mass, which was interpreted as a dorsum sellae. Transsphenoidal extirpation was used because of a suspicion of nonsecreting pituitary macroadenoma. Histopathologically, the tumor was diagnosed as a meningioma. Superselective external carotid angiography before the second surgery revealed that the mass was supplied by the left accessory middle meningeal artery and appeared to originate from dorsum sellae. After preoperative embolization, the patient developed hyponatremia. The tumor was subtotally removed via a transcranial route, and the attachment to the dorsum sellae was coagulated extensively. She did well after a second surgical procedure. CONCLUSION: These radiologic findings may be useful in differentiating dorsum sellae meningioma from pituitary macroadenoma.
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8/648. A case of aldosterone-producing adenoma with severe postoperative hyperkalemia.

    It is known that some patients with primary aldosteronism show postoperative hyperkalemia, which is due to inability of the adrenal gland to secrete sufficient amounts of aldosterone. However, hyperkalemia is generally neither severe nor prolonged, in which replacement therapy with mineralocorticoid is seldom necessary. We report a case of a 46-year-old woman with an aldosterone-producing adenoma associated with severe postoperative hyperkalemia. After unilateral adrenalectomy, the patient showed episodes of severe hyperkalemia for four months, which required not only cation-exchange resin, but also mineralocorticoid replacement. plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) was low, although PAC was increased after rapid ACTH test. Histological examination indicated the presence of adrenocortical tumor and paradoxical hyperplasia of zona glomerulosa in the adjacent adrenal. immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the enzymes involved in aldosterone synthesis, such as cholesterol side chain cleavage (P-450scc), 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD), and 21-hydroxylase (P-450c21), or the enzyme involved in glucocorticoid synthesis, 11beta-hydroxylase (P-450c11beta), were expressed in the tumor, but they were completely absent in zona glomerulosa of the adjacent adrenal. These findings were consistent with the patterns of primary aldosteronism. serum potassium level was gradually decreased with concomitant increase in PAC. These results suggest that severe postoperative hyperkalemia of the present case was attributable to severe suppression of aldosterone synthesis in the adjacent and contralateral adrenal, which resulted in slow recovery of aldosterone secretion. It is plausible that aldosterone synthesis of adjacent and contralateral adrenal glands is severely impaired in some cases with primary aldosteronism, as glucocorticoid synthesis in cushing syndrome.
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ranking = 7
keywords = operative
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9/648. Hazards of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for Conn's adenoma. When enthusiasm turns to tragedy.

    A 74-year-old man with primary aldosteronism had a small tumor (27 x 23 mm) of his right adrenal gland successfully removed by a transperitoneal laparoscopy. Despite absence of malignancy in the resected tumor and complete relief of all symptoms in the immediate postoperative period, recurrence occurred 6 months later. The tumor behaved as a carcinoma spread in the peritoneal cavity, and the patient eventually died with peritoneal carcinomatosis. We suggest that the laparoscopic technique coupled with pneumoperitoneum may have favored this recurrence.
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10/648. Inappropriate elevation of intact PTH in the presence of normocalcemia after successful surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism.

    We describe here a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism who had high serum intact PTH levels for over 16 months after parathyroidectomy without signs of recurrence or persistence of the disease. The patient was a 48-year-old female who appeared well nourished (body mass index, 23.7). She was received subtotal gastrectomy as treatment for a duodenal ulcer at 44 years and 5 months old and had reached menopaused at 46 years of age. hypercalcemia and a high serum intact PTH level were pointed out three months before admission to our institute. A bone densitometric study revealed that the bone mass of the lumbar spine was extremely reduced (0.636 g/cm2, Z score, -2.17) preoperatively and had not increased 29.5 months after parathyroidal adenomectomy (0.656 g/cm2, Z score, -1.97). hyperparathyroidism, menopause and gastrectomy may have together contributed to the reduced bone mass. The postoperative persistently increased PTH levels in our patient suggest that the remaining parathyroid glands could have been altered during hypercalcemia, causing an increase in the set-point of PTH secretion by serum calcium or a decrease in the renal responsiveness to PTH during the disease.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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