Cases reported "Ageusia"

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1/11. Reversible ageusia as an effect of clopidogrel treatment.

    In two patients we observed a loss of taste during clopidogrel treatment which was reversible.
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2/11. Reversible ageusia after chemotherapy with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of reversible ageusia in a patient with multiple myeloma receiving pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. CASE SUMMARY: A 67-year-old man with a history of arterial hypertension and persisting left bundle-branch block was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. He was initially treated with cyclophosphamide 200 mg/m(2) (days 1-4), pegylated liposomal doxorubicin 20 mg/m(2) (day 1), and dexamethasone 40 mg (days 1-4) (CLAD). That treatment was followed by high-dose melphalan therapy and autologous peripheral stem-cell transplantation. The disease recurred 18 months later, and renal failure developed. The patient was again treated with the CLAD protocol. After the first cycle, almost complete ageusia occurred, along with weight loss and severe depression. Chemotherapy was continued, but pegylated liposomal doxorubicin was replaced by conventional doxorubicin. Within 12 weeks, the patient's sense of taste returned to normal. DISCUSSION: Pegylated liposomal anthracyclines are increasingly being used as a less cardiotoxic alternative to conventional doxorubicin in first- and second-line therapy of multiple myeloma. Whereas cardiotoxicity and unspecific reactions are seen less frequently, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia is a common reaction to pegylated liposomal anthracyclines. No other reasons for ageusia in our patient could be identified. Based on the Naranjo probability scale, ageusia was rated as a probable reaction to pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. CONCLUSIONS: As with all new and innovative drugs, thorough documentation of infrequent adverse events is necessary. We would like to raise awareness for ageusia, which appears to be a rare but severely impairing adverse reaction to a relatively new pharmacologic agent.
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3/11. Hypogeusia as a complication of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and use of taste strips as a practical tool for quantifying hypogeusia.

    Hypogeusia is an uncommon complication of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) and few reports in the literature have documented it. Excision of part of the soft palate and damage to the glossopharyngeal nerve or its lingual branch as a result of diathermy or surgery are the possible causes. The case of a 45-year-old male who suffered hypogeusia following UPPP is reported herein. He reported no improvement over a 6-month period. Quantitative assessment of his taste threshold for the 4 basic tastes using taste strips showed a score of 7/18, indicating hypogeusia. The possibility of taste disorder as a postoperative complication should be discussed before patients consent to UPPP Postoperative taste threshold assessment should be done using taste strips if the patient complains of taste disorders.
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ranking = 0.0035724986685632
keywords = hypogeusia
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4/11. Nuclear bilateral Bell's palsy and ageusia associated with mycoplasma pneumoniae pulmonary infection.

    This case report describes a case of nuclear bilateral Bell's palsy and ageusia associated with mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. magnetic resonance imaging evidenced T2-weighted hyper-intense protuberantial lesions. Such topography leading to a nuclear palsy contrasts with previously reported infectious diplegia involving only peripheral facial nerves, and has not yet been described in the spectrum of M. pneumoniae post-infectious neurological manifestations.
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5/11. Transient hemiageusia in cerebrovascular lateral pontine lesions.

    knowledge of human central taste pathways is largely based on textbook (anatomical dissections) and animal (electrophysiology in vivo) data. It is only recently that further functional insight into human central gustatory pathways has been achieved. magnetic resonance imaging studies, especially selective imaging of vascular, tumoral, or inflammatory lesions in humans has made this possible. However, some questions remain, particularly regarding the exact crossing site of human gustatory afferences. We present a patient with a pontine stroke after a vertebral artery thrombosis. The patient had infarctions in areas supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and showed vertical diplopia, right sided deafness, right facial palsy, and transient hemiageusia. A review of the sparse literature of central taste disorders and food preference changes after strokes with a focus on hemiageusia cases is provided. This case offers new evidence suggesting that the central gustatory pathway in humans runs ipsilaterally within the pons and crosses at a higher, probably midbrain level. In patients with central lesions, little attention has been given to taste disorders. They may often go unnoticed by the physician and/or the patient. Central lesions involving taste pathways seem to generate perceptions of quantitative taste disorders (hemiageusia or hypogeusia), in contrast to peripheral gustatory lesions that are hardly recognised as quantitative but sometimes as qualitative (dysgeusia) taste disorders by patients.
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keywords = ageusia, hypogeusia
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6/11. Hemiageusia, hemianaesthesia and hemiatrophy of the tongue.

    A patient with a submandibular gland carcinoma was found clinically to have a unilateral chorda tympani, lingual and hypoglossal nerve deficit. This unique neurological entity of loss of taste sensation of one-half of the tongue (hemiageusia), hemianaesthesia and hemiatrophy of the tongue, has not previously been reported.
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7/11. Generalized argyrosis in man: neurotological, ultrastructural and X-ray microanalytical findings.

    Generalized argyrosis can produce a number of abnormalities, including skin discoloration, liver and kidney dysfunction. We describe a patient with generalized argyrosis following long-term self-treatment with oral silver intake, in whom skin discoloration, progressive taste and smell disorders, vertigo and hypesthesia were observed. These findings were confirmed by chemosensory tests and electrophysiological investigations. The development of hypogeusia was assessed by subjective tests, while the progression of hyposmia was followed by recording olfactory evoked cortical potentials. light and electron microscopy of tissue samplings demonstrated electron-dense mineral deposits in basal membranes, in macrophages, in the perineurium of peripheral nerves, along elastic and collagenous fibers, and in necrotic cells of the oral submucosa. silver and sulfur deposits in affected tissues could be defined by X-ray microanalysis. The quantitative ratio between silver and sulfur in involved tissues was similar to that of an inorganic silver-sulfide (Ag2S) standard. The minute increase in the sulfur content when compared to the inorganic standard suggested a sulfur containing organic matrix of the tissue precipitates. Our findings indicate that the affinity of silver for membrane and neuronal structures and the deposition of silver as an insoluble compound (Ag2S) induce the progression of clinical disease.
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ranking = 0.00059541644476053
keywords = hypogeusia
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8/11. ageusia associated with thalamic plaque in multiple sclerosis.

    ageusia and the cheirooral syndrome developed in a patient with a relapse of multiple sclerosis. magnetic resonance imaging revealed an area of demyelination in the thalamus. This lesion presumably affected the most medial part of the ventralis posterior nucleus, where taste information is located. Given the proximity of the taste area and somatosensory representation of the hand and oral cavity in the ventralis posterior nucleus, we propose that a diagnosis of thalamic lesion should be considered when ageusia occurs with the cheirooral syndrome.
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9/11. chorda tympani nerve injury following inferior alveolar injection: a review of two cases.

    Permanent nerve injury following the injection of local anesthetic during dental procedures is rare. Two cases of chorda tympani nerve injury shown by ageusia are presented.
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10/11. Case of ageusia from a variety of causes.

    We report a case of a 31-year-old woman with ageusia. Her ageusia was related to a variety of causes including an unbalanced diet, administration of the anti-epileptic drug, carbamazepine and psychological factors. Her taste function recovered after stopping the carbamazepine and treatment with liver extracts and zinc sulphate.
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keywords = ageusia
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