Cases reported "Aggressive Periodontitis"

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1/15. Accidentally delayed diagnosis of ruptured ovarian carcinoma in a young woman: a care report.

    Ovarian carcinoma commonly occurs in postmenopausal women and often presents with an insidious course. Acute abdomen is rarely an initial symptom. When these patients present with abdominal discomfort, the disease has already spread throughout the peritoneal cavity. We present a case of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma in a young woman who presented with acute abdomen and intra-abdominal bleeding. This 24-year-old woman was previously diagnosed with a ruptured left ovarian cystic tumor at a primary clinic. She underwent emergency exploratory laparotomy, followed by unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy at the clinic. No thorough examination of the peritoneal cavity was done during surgery. The diagnosis of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was accidentally over-looked until one month later when she returned for routine follow-up. Upon referral to our clinic, the patient underwent a repeat laparotomy. The surgicopathologic diagnosis was intraperitoneal carcinomatosis stage IIIC that could not be excised completely, even though rigorous staging surgery including washing cytology, total abdominal hysterectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy, retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy, appendectomy, infracolic omentectomy and excision of any suspicious and removable lesions were performed. This case alerts us to consider the possibility of ovarian malignancy when a young woman presents with an acute abdomen secondary to ruptured ovarian cystic tumor and intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Careful preoperative preparation and thorough intrasurgical examination of the peritoneal cavity along with a prompt pathologic diagnosis of suspicious lesions will prevent missed diagnoses.
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2/15. Perforation of acute calculous Meckel's diverticulitis: a rare cause of acute abdomen in elderly.

    Complications of the Meckel's diverticula are well-known and defined. However, acute inflammation and perforation secondary to a calculus is a rare clinical presentation. A case of acute calculous Meckel's diverticulitis with perforation in a 58-year old man is presented and possible pathological conditions are discussed. Location of the perforation, apical microscopic focal ulcers, and ischaemic changes in the diverticulum remind the pathogenesis comparable to that of acute calculous cholecystitis. This case report with major complications related to Meckel's diverticulum strengthens the concept of prophylactic resection of Meckel's diverticulum in adults, incidentally discovered at laparotomy.
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3/15. Meckel's diverticulum perforation with intraabdominal hemorrhage.

    Perforation of Meckel's diverticulum in children is a rare and serious complication. The authors report a case of a 3-year-old boy with perforation and hemoperitoneum caused by Meckel's diverticulum. Difficulty of preoperative diagnosis is discussed, indication for incidental diverticulotomy is established, and the literature is reviewed.
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4/15. Strangulated umbilical hernia including a mesenteric cyst: a rare cause of acute abdomen.

    Mesenteric cysts are rare intra-abdominal lesions. They are usually diagnosed as an incidental laparotomy finding in adults but in childhood, they may present with acute abdomen. In this report, a 72-year old female was referred to our hospital, suffering from acute abdominal pain, several episodes of nausea and vomiting. Clinical abdominal examination revealed an irreducible recurrent umbilical hernia. The patient had both muscular defense and abdominal tenderness. Plain abdominal radiography showed multiple air-fluid levels. With these findings, a diagnosis of acute abdominal pathology was accepted and an urgent laparotomy was performed. A 5-cm-diameter mesenteric cyst was excised from the mesentery of the proximal jejunum and a prosthetic mesh was placed for incisional hernia. This is the first report of a strangulated umbilical hernia complicated with a mesenteric cyst.
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5/15. choledochal cyst with perforation--an unusual presentation. Case report and review of the literature.

    A unique case of a 22-month-old baby girl with a perforated choledochal cyst, who presented with vague abdominal symptoms but without any jaundice, an acute abdomen and an incidental finding of acholic stools, is described below with a review of the literature.
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6/15. Needle perforation of the bowel in childhood.

    Accidental ingestion of foreign bodies occurs frequently in childhood. The majority of them are passed spontaneously, and conservative management generally is recommended for foreign bodies in the stomach and duodenum. However, in some cases, operative intervention should be considered to prevent undesirable complications, such as intestinal perforation. Two cases of intestinal perforation owing to accidental ingestion of a needle are reported.
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7/15. Acute abdomen caused by a ruptured spontaneously infected mesenteric cyst.

    Mesenteric cysts are uncommon and usually asymptomatic abdominal tumors. Spontaneous infection is a very rare complication of these lesions. This report presents a case of spontaneously infected and perforated mesenteric cyst. Any incidental mesenteric cyst diagnosed during radiological examination should be removed completely, even if it has been asymptomatic, to prevent potential life-threatening complications.
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8/15. Salmonellosis and ulcerative colitis. A causal relationship or just a coincidence.

    Coincidence of salmonellosis and ulcerative colitis is a rare clinical problem. salmonella infection was reported to complicate the ulcerative colitis, as either facilitating its occurrence or activation. In this article, we present a case with salmonellosis whose clinicopathological findings also suggested ulcerative colitis. The patient improved rapidly after taking additional mesalazine to norfloxacin treatment. We conclude that salmonella infection might have either been coincidentally present or might have triggered an early ulcerative colitis in this patient who did not have history of inflammatory bowel diseases. In case of persistent severe diarrhea despite appropriate treatment, the possibility of a coincident inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis should always be considered, especially in endemic regions for salmonellosis.
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9/15. Mesenteric cystic lymphangioma: unusual cause of intra-abdominal catastrophe in an adult.

    Mesenteric cystic lymphangiomas (MCLs) are rare benign cystic tumours of unknown aetiology, most often seen in paediatric patients. The clinical presentation is diverse, ranging from an incidentally discovered abdominal cyst to symptoms of acute abdomen. A 20-year-old male presented with generalised abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting of several hours duration following heavy lifting. Emergency laparotomy revealed a 15 x 10 x 8-cm pedicled cystic mass of the mid-ileal mesentery, causing a volvulus. The cyst and a 20-cm gangrenous intestinal segment were resected with anastomosis. The postoperative course was uncomplicated. MCLs should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic intra-abdominal lesions. Even when asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, they must be treated surgically because of the potential to grow, invade vital structures and develop life-threatening complications.
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10/15. Cystic lymphangioma of the jejunal mesentery in an adult: a case report.

    We herein describe the case of a 27-year-old female, who presented with a large mass of the upper left abdominal cavity discovered incidentally, through an annual health examination. Preoperative studies including abdominal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed, but they could not accurately determine the nature of the tumor. At laparotomy, a large cystic tumor of the small bowel mesentery was found. Histopathologic examination diagnosed the tumor as a cystic lymphangioma. Although lymphangiomas are rare, especially in the abdomen of adults, they may sometimes present as acute abdomen, causing complications that require emergent surgery.
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