Cases reported "Agranulocytosis"

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1/6. Autoimmune neutropenia in infancy due to anti-NA1 antibody: detection of antibody with immunofluorescence and agglutination test.

    The sera from two patients with chronic neutropenia in infancy were examined for the presence of antineutrophil antibodies and their specificity against neutrophil antigen by using granulocyte indirect immunofluorescence test and microleukocyte agglutination test. In the microleukocyte agglutination test, the patients' sera reacted with neutrophils from their parents and normal unrelated donors having the neutrophil antigen NA1, but not with neutrophils from NA1- donors. After the absorption of patients' sera with NA1 neutrophils, the antibody activity was completely abolished, resulting in the confirmation of the anti-NA1 antibody. In contrast, the granulocyte indirect immunofluorescence test showed positive reactions against both NA1 and NA1- neutrophils, and the specificity for anti-NA1 was found in the results of the sera absorbed with NA1 neutrophils. This suggested that the absorption experiment might be necessary to determine the specificity of the antibody for neutrophil antigen. Thus, we confirmed two cases with autoimmune neutropenia caused by anti-NA1 antibody. A combination of agglutination and immunofluorescence techniques would be recommended for investigation of neutrophil antibodies against the neutrophil-specific antigen.
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keywords = agglutination
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2/6. Microcapillary agglutination assay for detection of specific antileukocyte reactivity in neutropenic patients.

    serum leukoagglutinating activity against the leukocytes of four patients with neutropenia was demonstrated using a modified microcapillary agglutination test. cells from a panel of donors proved useful in attempting to define the identity of the antigens involved. In one instance anti-HLA-A9 activity could be demonstrated in a patient possessing HLA-A9. In the other three individuals no definite antigen assessment to HLA Series A and B antigens or the Lalezari series of neutrophil antigens could be made. Two of the patients' sera showed cross-reactivity and may be reactive with the same antigen or antigenic group. The microcapillary agglutination test appears to be useful in the evaluation of possible cases of autoimmune neutropenia.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = agglutination
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3/6. quinidine-induced agranulocytosis.

    In a 75-year-old man, agranulocytosis and septicemia developed after eight weeks of quinidine sulfate therapy. An IgG antibody requiring the presence of quinidine was shown by complement-dependent leukocytotoxicity and leukoagglutination reactions. The antibody did not cross-react with quinine and was active against WBCs obtained from normal subjects and from the patient himself.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = agglutination
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4/6. Group-specific auto-immune antibodies directed to granulocytes as a cause of chronic benign neutropenia in infants.

    Chronic benign neutropenia of infancy is a disease which develops a few months after birth and which is characterized by a severe selective neutropenia, accompanied by benign but persisting infections. The cause of the disease is still unknown. The sera from 5 such patients were tested for the presence of granulocyte antibodies as a possible cause of the disease. For the detection of these antibodies immunofluorescence, agglutination and granulocytotoxicity were used. All sera contained antibodies which reacted both with the neutrophils of one or both parents of the patient and a part of a panel of unrelated donors. From the reaction patterns against the panel we could identify the specificity of three sera. Two sera were directed to the neutrophil-specific antigen NA2, and the third one reacted with a hitherto not yet recognized neutrophil-specific alloantigen which we called NE1. In 4 patients we could confirm the autoimmune character of the disease by demonstrating the antibody on the patients' own granulocytes. These results suggest that autoimmunity may be the cause of many cases of benign infantile neutropenia.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = agglutination
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5/6. A comparison of methods for detecting leukocyte antibodies in autoimmune neutropenia.

    A six-month-old girl and an 18-month-old boy with autoimmune neutropenia due to anti-NA1 are described. The antibodies were detected by granulocyte microagglutination, and their disappearance in the girl coincided with a return of a normal neutrophil count. The autoantibodies in both patients also reacted in the granulocyte cytotoxicity (GC) assay, and in one patient, in the staphylococcal protein a (SPA) assay. However, neither the GC nor the SPA assays showed the anti-NA1 specificity found by agglutination, and the presence of GC and SPA antibodies did not coincide with neutropenia. These three leukocyte antibody techniques may detect different antibodies and have different clinical significances. This report provides additional evidence of the existence of autoimmune neutropenia and indicates that the clinical role of neutrophil antibodies detected by different serologic techniques is not yet established. Antibodies detected by granulocyte agglutination were clinically significant in these two patients with autoimmune neutropenia, while the results of testing with GC and SPA were not.
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ranking = 0.42857142857143
keywords = agglutination
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6/6. role of neutrophil antigen NA1 in an infant with autoimmune neutropenia.

    A nontransfused 14-month-old female infant was investigated for persistent neutropenia of eight months' duration, with absolute neutrophil counts ranging from 410 to 935 cu mm. The patient's sera reacted with neutrophils from her own peripheral blood, from normal donors, and from her mother, all these having the neutrophil antigen NA 1, but not with neutrophils from NA 1-negative donors, including the father. The autoantibody was detectable by capillary agglutination and by indirect immunofluorescence techniques but not by complement-dependent cytotoxicity. No antibody was found in the mother's serum. Studies on three occasions showed good correlation between the appearance of circulating autoantibody and the peripheral neutrophil counts. Our observations, together with previously published reports, suggest a possible relationship of NA 1 antigen and the disease susceptibility of NA 1-positive infants to autoimmune neutropenia.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = agglutination
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