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1/40. Phytophotodermatitis associated with parsnip picking.

    Phytophotodermatitis to certain plant groups is a well recognised entity. The combination of sunlight exposure and contact with plants of the umbelliferae family leads to the development of painful, erythematous, and bullous lesions and later to cutaneous hyperpigmentation. Agricultural workers and many clinicians often fail to make this link when patients present with these lesions. An incident involving 11 patients is presented to high-light this problem.
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2/40. mesothelioma in an agricultural community of india: a clinicopathological study.

    mesothelioma is an uncommon neoplastic condition. Its association with asbestos exposure is well established, but it occurs even in non-industrial workers, and naturally there must be some other factors in its aetiology than asbestos exposure. In this report, five patients with primary mesothelioma, all belonging to a rural agricultural community with no chance of any asbestos exposure, have been documented. There was one common interesting observation, in that all five patients were associated with sugar-cane farming or an allied trade. Whether this observation is coincidental or has any aetiological bearing on mesothelioma needs further investigation. Its histopathological features, symptomatology, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed, with a brief review of the literature.
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3/40. Occupational contact dermatitis to phaseolus vulgaris in a farmer - a case report.

    A case of occupational contact dermatitis in a farmer is described, caused among others by phaseolus vulgaris. The patient's history of eczematous and vesicular and bullous skin reactions occurring after exposure to phaseolus was confirmed by skin tests with native leaves of the plant. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of occupational contact dermatitis caused by leaves of phaseolus plant.
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4/40. Contact dermatitis to Asparagus officinalis.

    A 53-year-old farm worker presented with a 3-year history of an occupational allergic contact dermatitis to asparagus. The dermatitis cleared quickly with courses of systemic corticosteroids but relapsed within days of further exposure to asparagus. The genera Asparagus is made up of some 300 species. It belongs to the family liliaceae which includes tulips, onions and garlic. Asparagus contains asparagin, coniferin and the glucoside vanillin. The allergen may be a plant growth inhibitor, 1,2,3-Trithiane-5-carboxylic acid, which is present in young shoots.
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5/40. Recurrent infestation of the mastoid cavity with Caloglyphus berlesei: an occupational hazard.

    Mite infestation of the ear is an unusual clinical problem that is easily cured with simple measures and recurrent infestation has not been reported till date. We present here a patient who developed recurrent infestation of otherwise healthy mastoid cavities with the storage mite Caloglyphus berlesei, secondary to occupational exposure. This kind of recurrent mite infestation of the ear has not been described before.
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ranking = 194.7177777106
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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6/40. Three cases of acute methyl bromide poisoning in a seedling farm family.

    We encountered three patients (Patient I: 39-year-old man, Patient II: 34-year-old woman, and Patient III: 5-year-old girl) with acute methyl bromide poisoning, which had occurred as a result of exposure to the gas that leaked from methyl bromide cans stored in a warehouse of a seedling farm. Since all three patients exhibited almost the same initial symptoms, i.e., severe vomiting, tonic convulsions and clouding of consciousness, botulism was suspected at first. However, subsequent inquiry revealed that 27 cans of methyl bromide had been stored in the building that the patients lived in, and that the cans had been damaged a few days before the onset of the patients' illness by a thrashing machine that was being moved by them to another location. Inspection revealed that all the cans of methyl bromide had passed the expiry date and were corroded. Even though none of the cans had been used, three cans with a capacity of 750 g were found to be empty. plasma bromide ion concentrations were determined to be high (72.9 microg/ml, 67.8 microg/ml and 91.5 microg/ml; normal level, < 5 microg/ml), and acute methyl bromide poisoning was diagnosed 8 days after admission of the patients to the hospital. Hemodialysis (peritoneal lavage in the case of the child) was performed immediately, after which the plasma bromide ion concentrations returned to normal and the general condition of the patients gradually improved.
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7/40. hypersensitivity pneumonitis induced by the spore of pleurotus Eryngii (Eringi).

    We reported the first case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) by an edible mushroom, pleurotus Eryngii (Eringi). A 54-year-old woman had worked in a Bunashimeji mushroom factory for 42 months, and she moved to a new factory producing Eringi. Two months after, she was found to have HP by the spore of Eringi. Although no radiological finding was detected 6 months before the onset of HP, serum surfactant protein D (SP-D) had been elevated. We speculated that type II pneumocyte activation might prepare the ground for HP during the former exposure to Bunashimeji, and serum SP-D levels might reflect their conditions.
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8/40. gardening in greenhouses as a risk factor for silicosis.

    silicosis is a typical occupational disease, although some cases caused by non-industrial exposure have also been reported. We saw a 53-year-old male gardener with recurrent non-productive cough. A routine radiograph of the chest showed bilateral pulmonary nodules and subsequent computed tomography suggested that the infiltrates could be metastases. Open lung biopsy revealed nodules consisting of fibrotic tissue while the presence of birefringent silica particles was observed by polarised light microscopy. Mineralogical analysis of the substrata from the patient's workplace revealed an SiO(2) concentration of 31%. This case indicates that the inhalation of siliceous particles in a closed environment such as a greenhouse is a risk factor for silicosis.
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9/40. erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae endocarditis: a preventable zoonosis?

    BACKGROUND: erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a bacterium ubiquitous in the environment. It can cause a variety of diseases and the risk of infection is closely related to the level of occupational exposure to infected or colonised animals. AIMS: To discuss the clinical features and treatment of this zoonosis, to increase awareness of this pathogen and to emphasise the need for meticulous attention to hygienic work practices in reducing the risk of infection. METHOD: A case report of a farmer with E. rhusiopathiae endocarditis and the management of the infection. RESULTS: The patient was successfully treated with valve replacement surgery and antimicrobial therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Early identification of this microorganism is essential for appropriate treatment of endocarditis. Greater awareness and safe work practices can help reduce the risk of human infection by this microorganism.
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ranking = 194.7177777106
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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10/40. Acute toxic pneumonitis complicating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a farmer.

    BACKGROUND: Toxic pneumonitis or Organic dust Toxic syndrome (ODTS) is a common, usually self-limiting condition among agricultural workers, occurring after high level exposure to agricultural dust. CASE REPORT: We describe the case of a 68-year-old smoker and farmer who became ill with dyspnea, flu-like symptoms, and hypoxia after cleaning out a grain bin. RESULTS: Chest radiograph was normal. He was treated with steroids, antibiotics, and oxygen supplementation and recovered over 3 months, but continues with lingering exercise intolerance after 2 years. DISCUSSION: Although toxic pneumonitis usually follows a relatively benign course with spontaneous recovery and no permanent sequale it can lead to the exacerbation of underlying lung conditions, resulting in incomplete or delayed recovery. Prevention is aimed at limiting exposure by avoidance, by increasing ventilation in closed spaces and by appropriate use of personal protective equipment.
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ranking = 2
keywords = exposure
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