Cases reported "Airway Obstruction"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/85. Traumatic macroglossia: a life-threatening complication.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of muscle relaxants and a bite raiser to avoid continued tongue trauma. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: A tertiary general intensive care unit (ICU). INTERVENTIONS: muscle relaxation and bite raiser. MAIN RESULTS: muscle relaxation and a bite raiser were used in a 17-yr-old male with traumatic macroglossia, which allowed for rapid resolution of edema and prevented additional trauma to the tongue. CONCLUSION: Early use of a bite raiser together with muscle relaxants allows for more rapid solution of edema and prevention of additional trauma to the tongue in patients with traumatic macroglossia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/85. airway obstruction due to late-onset angioneurotic edema from angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition.

    PURPOSE: Angioneurotic edema is a well-documented complication of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI). We report a case of acute airway obstruction from a late-onset, probable ACEI-related angioneurotic edema and its subsequent management. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 48-yr-old obese man presented for transurethral resection of a bladder tumour (TURBT). His past medical history included hypertension controlled with hydrochlorothiazide and quinapril which had been started 13 mo earlier. Previous surgery was uncomplicated. midazolam was used for premedication and for intraoperative sedation together with fentanyl and propofol. After uneventful spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine, operation and recovery, he was transferred to the floor. Five hours later he developed severe edema of his face, tongue and neck, with drooling, that progressed into airway obstruction and respiratory arrest. ventilation was restored via immediate cricothyroidotomy, and a subsequent tracheotomy was completed uneventfully in the operating room. His serum C1 esterase inhibitor levels at 1, 5 and 23 days later were normal. The angioneurotic edema was attributed to the ACEI treatment. The edema resolved after 48 hr, and further follow-up was unremarkable. CONCLUSION: This observation is consistent with other reports that angioneurotic edema from ACEI can occur many months after the initiation of treatment. This can involve the airway and may produce life-threatening respiratory compromise. physicians should be aware of this association and the possible need for immediate surgical intervention for the establishment of an airway in case of worsening edema or respiratory arrest.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/85. Functional airway obstruction mimicking tongue angioedema.

    BACKGROUND: Functional causes of upper airway obstruction have focused primarily on psychogenic stridor associated with paradoxical vocal cord dysfunction. angioedema can involve upper airway structures and be life-threatening. CASE REPORT: We report a 12-year-old female with upper airway obstruction from posterior tongue swelling which was determined to be a conversion reaction. methods & RESULTS: A lateral neck film revealed severe tongue swelling. Examination revealed a calm, cooperative patient in no distress but exhibiting inspiratory and expiratory stridor. A computed tomography scan revealed soft tissue fullness at the base of the tongue without associated lymphadenopathy. Laboratory evaluation was normal. With anesthetic induction in the operating room, there was complete relaxation of the upper airway with no evidence of tongue swelling, mass, or other abnormality. Following tongue biopsy, she had no reoccurrence of the tongue mass. CONCLUSION: This case represents a childhood conversion reaction of functional airway obstruction where tongue manipulation simulated tongue swelling radiographically consistent with angioedema.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/85. Perinatal management of a neonate with airway obstruction caused by rhabdomyosarcoma of the tongue.

    Intra-oral masses in neonates can seriously compromise the airway, potentially causing hypoxia and death if not recognized and managed appropriately. We report a case in which an intra-oral mass was diagnosed on antenatal ultrasound scan. Preparation for delivery involved a multidisciplinary team approach, with a strategy for management at delivery. The child was delivered by elective Caesarean section and had a patent airway. A tracheostomy was performed immediately after delivery. The infant underwent a debulking procedure 3 weeks after birth. A histological diagnosis of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma was made and a course of chemotherapy commenced. The child had a partial response to treatment with considerable shrinkage of the tongue mass. We discuss the management options in neonates with intra-oral masses to provide an adequate airway and maintain fetal oxygenation. The differential diagnosis of fetal oral masses is reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/85. Massive postoperative swelling of the tongue: manual decompression and tactile intubation as a life-saving measure.

    Massive swelling of the tongue due to haemorrhage is a rare but potentially fatal complication secondary to trauma, surgery, tumour invasion or uncontrolled anticoagulant therapy. This article presents a report of bleeding from the left lingual artery secondary to elective excision of a lipoma of the floor of the mouth and subsequent life-threatening upper airway obstruction. In this case, the upper airway obstruction was managed by manual decompression of the tongue and tactile nasal intubation. To our knowledge this case provides the first description of using this method in life-threatening upper airway obstruction caused by massive haemorrhagic swelling of the tongue.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.3333333333333
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/85. Nonsurgical and nonextraction treatment of skeletal Class III open bite: its long-term stability.

    Two female patients, aged 14 years 5 months and 17 years 3 months with skeletal Class III open bite and temporomandibular dysfunction are presented. They had previously been classified as orthognathic surgical cases, involving first premolar removal. The primary treatment objective was to eliminate those skeletal and neuromuscular factors that were dominant in establishing their malocclusions. These included abnormal behavior of the tongue with short labial and lingual frenula, bilateral imbalance of chewing muscles, a partially blocked nasopharyngeal airway causing extrusion of the molars, with rotation of the mandible and narrowing of the maxillary arch. Resultant occlusal interference caused the mandible to shift to one side, which in turn produced the abnormal occlusal plane and curve of Spee. As a result, the form and function of the joints were adversely affected by the structural and functional asymmetry. These cases were treated by expanding the maxillary arch, which brought the maxilla downward and forward. The mandible moved downward and backward, with a slight increase in anterior facial height. Intruding and uprighting the posterior teeth, combined with a maxillary protraction, reconstructed the occlusal plane. A favorable perioral environment was created with widened tongue space in order to produce an adequate airway. myofunctional therapy after lingual and labial frenectomy was assisted by vigorous gum chewing during and after treatment, together with a tooth positioner. Normal nasal breathing was achieved.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/85. Lingual tonsillectomy for refractory paroxysmal cough.

    Historically, the lingual tonsils are the most neglected members of Waldeyer's ring. They are often overlooked even in a thorough head and neck exam because of their anatomic location and the ambiguous constellation of symptoms which they produce when they are diseased or enlarged. The lingual tonsils have been reported to be associated with a variety of upper aerodigestive tract symptoms including odynophagia, dysphagia, otalgia, globus, halitosis, chronic cough, and dyspnea. Many patients with lingual tonsillar pathology may undergo extensive work-up for some of these non-specific upper airway complaints by their primary physician before referral to an otolaryngologist. Consequently, the diagnosis of lingual tonsillar disease requires a high index of suspicion and a thorough physical exam including evaluation of the tongue base and hypophaynx with indirect mirror or fiberoptic exam. In order to draw attention to this frequently unrecognized entity, we present a case report of a child with chronic cough resulting from lingual tonsillar hypertrophy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/85. Lingual haematoma: yet another unusual cause of upper airway obstruction.

    An episode of acute upper airway obstruction was caused by a lingual haematoma, when a patient with end stage renal failure suffered a hypocalcaemic fit and bit his tongue. The large haematoma and profuse bleeding caused the patient to obstruct and become hypoxic, and rendered laryngoscopy and intubation impossible, requiring an urgent tracheostomy to secure the airway.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/85. Subperiosteal release of the floor of the mouth musculature in two cases of Pierre Robin sequence.

    Many management approaches have been considered to relieve upper respiratory obstruction in patients with Pierre Robin sequence, but the choice of treatment is determined by the severity of the obstruction. These options include prone positioning, the use of a nasal trumpet, and surgery. One surgical technique is the subperiosteal release of the floor of the mouth musculature. The theory behind this procedure is that this musculature is under tension, and therefore it pushes the tongue upward and backward, resulting in respiratory obstruction. In theory, the release of this musculature from the mandible should alleviate the tension and hence clear the obstruction. In an attempt to objectively evaluate this theory, we performed subperiosteal release surgery on two infants. Our first patient required an emergent tracheostomy on postoperative day 2 because of the onset of surgically induced airway edema. To avoid this complication in the second patient, we performed a tracheostomy at the same time as surgery. Pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging in the second patient revealed only a minimal change in the anatomy of the floor of the mouth musculature. We believe the subperiosteal release of the floor of the mouth musculature requires further evaluation before it can be considered to be effective in the surgical treatment of respiratory obstruction in Pierre Robin sequence.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/85. lingual thyroid--a threat to the airway.

    The occurrence of a thyroid gland superficially placed on the pharyngeal portion of the tongue is rare, but poses problems to the patient and anaesthetist. This report describes a patient with a lingual thyroid and a history of problems associated with it that resulted in admission to the ICU and warnings about future intubation of the larynx. The patient underwent awake tracheal intubation using a standard fibreoptic assisted technique, and was advised that she purchase an appropriate Medic-Alert bracelet.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = tongue
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Airway Obstruction'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.