Cases reported "Akinetic Mutism"

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1/4. Quadrigeminal cistern lipoma.

    Intracranial lipomas are rare benign congenital neoplasms accounting for 0.1 to 0.5% of all primary brain tumours. Approximately 50% are associated with other cerebral developmental disorders. These slow growing benign lesions are usually asymptomatic and rarely require surgery. We report the case of a 37 year old woman presented with signs of raised intracranial pressure. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a quadrigeminal cistern lipoma compressing the aqueduct of Sylvius. The patient underwent surgery and a distinct plane of cleavage between the lipoma and the adjacent neural structures was found, allowing total removal of the lesion. Postoperatively, the patient was relieved of her original symptoms but developed akinetic mutism which lasted for two weeks. Intracranial lipomas rarely become symptomatic and surgery is seldom required. If the lesion progresses and causes symptoms of raised intracranial pressure or compression of neural structures, surgical intervention is indicated. Total removal should not be attempted unless a plain of cleavage between the lesion and adjacent neural structures is present. Surgical manipulation should be minimised to avoid complications.
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keywords = aqueduct
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2/4. akinetic mutism and parkinsonism associated with obstructive hydrocephalus.

    We report the case of a patient with idiopathic aqueductal stenosis and hydrocephalus who had several episodes of akinetic mutism, each preceded by shunt malfunction, that resolved with shunt revision. She also developed a parkinson's syndrome resistant to shunt revision but responsive to antiparkinsonian medications. The parkinson's syndrome and the episodes of akinetic mutism may be related to a reduction of dopaminergic input to the striatum and to the cingulate and frontal cortex brought about or worsened by ventricular dilatation.
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keywords = aqueduct
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3/4. adult aqueduct stenosis and diencephalic epilepsy. A case report.

    A white male developed severe headaches at the age of 31 years. Aqueduct stenosis with hydrocephalus was diagnosed. Some months after surgery (shunt) his behaviour altered and eventually he became mute and akinetic. Frequent episodes of marked autonomic over-activity occurred. The clinical and necropsy findings of aqueduct stenosis, hydrocephalus and periaqueductal gliosis, led us to believe that these indicated diencephalic epilepsy.
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keywords = aqueduct
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4/4. role of cavum septum pellucidum in akinetic mutism of hydrocephalic children.

    Two children 9 and 13 years of age with histories of aqueductal stenosis developed akinetic mutism after multiple shunt revisions. The girl had spontaneous relief of her akinetic mutism 1 month later, after parenteral antibiotics and multiple shunt revisions. The akinetic mutism of the boy was resistant to antiparkinsonian therapy before megadosage of bromocriptine (120 mg/day). Both children had a prominent cavum septum pellucidum (CSP), which has rarely been involved in the pathogenesis of akinetic mutism. Because of the rapid shrinkage of the girl's CSP after shunt revision, but not that of the boy even after stereotactic fenestration of the wall of his CSP, their eventual outcomes were different. Wide CSP (WCSP) may play an important role in the occurrence of akinetic mutism in hydrocephalic patients.
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keywords = aqueduct
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