Cases reported "Alveolar Bone Loss"

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1/54. Use of crestal bone for augmentation of extremely knife-edged alveolar ridges prior to implant placement: report of 3 cases.

    A technique is presented for interforaminal lateral augmentation of mandibles with adequate bone height, but extremely knife-edged mandibular alveolar ridges (Class IV of Cawood and Howell's classification of residual ridges), in which the crestal portion of the knife-edged ridge is used as grafting material. Following an osteotomy and rotation of the grafts by 180 degrees, the grafts were fixed to the residual ridge below the osteotomy line by means of miniscrews. All grafts showed only mild resorption after a healing period of 3 months, and it was possible to place 4 implants in the now sufficiently wide host region.
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keywords = resorption
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2/54. Contemporary treatment of the resorbed avulsed tooth: a case report.

    This report describes the treatment sequence after traumatic loss of a maxillary central incisor in a 15-year-old patient. Following extraoral root canal treatment and initially successful replantation, the case presented 9 years later with complete root resorption. After augmentation with an autologous mandibular corticocancellous graft, a dental implant was placed in a second stage surgery. The case highlights the challenge facing clinicians in providing the appropriate standard of care for today's treatment options.
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3/54. Aesthetic management of extractions for implant site development: delayed versus staged implant placement.

    Resorption of the dentoalveolar bone and collapse of the gingival ridge following tooth loss often results in aesthetic compromise and inadequate bone for "prosthetically driven" implant placement. Preventing alveolar bone resorption with a conservative procedure at the time of extraction can enhance aesthetics and reduce the duration and extent of treatment required for implant placement. This article describes the aesthetic management of extraction sites using a conservative bone grafting procedure at the time of extraction for implant site development. The case presented demonstrates staged and delayed implant placement techniques.
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keywords = resorption
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4/54. A case of Burkitt's lymphoma that presented initially with resorption of alveolar bone.

    A 16-year-old male was evaluated for a 1-month history of alveolar bone resorption, which had been treated with endodontics by a neighborhood dentist. Intraoral examination showed slight gingival swelling and teeth mobility. However, no tumor mass was seen. The panoramic image showed resorption of alveolar bone and loss of teeth lamina dura. Because he complained of general fatigue, he was introduced to the internist. Biopsies of gingiva and bone marrow aspiration revealed a massive proliferation of lymphoblasts expressing CD10, 19, 20 and hla-dr antigens on the surface. Their karyotypes were abnormal; 46, XY, t (8;14) (q24;q32). Accordingly, he was diagnosed as Burkitt's lymphoma, and received intensive chemotherapy which relieved his symptoms and decreased his tumor. However, his disease soon became refractory to chemotherapy, and he died 11 weeks after the onset.
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keywords = resorption
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5/54. gingival overgrowth as the initial paraneoplastic manifestation of Hodgkin's lymphoma in a child. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this paper is to present the first case of gingival overgrowth, premature root resorption, and alveolar bone loss, which preceded the diagnosis of a stage IVB Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in a 9-year-old boy. methods: The child presented complaining of gingival pain which first appeared 3 months prior. Clinical examination revealed inflamed, hyperplastic gingivae, while x-ray showed premature root resorption and alveolar bone loss. Medical work-up was significant for cervical lymphadenopathy. Gingival biopsy, followed by lymph node resection, was performed twice. RESULTS: Histological examination of both gingival biopsies disclosed a mixed inflammatory infiltrate, while classical Hodgkin's lymphoma of the nodular sclerosis type was diagnosed from the second lymph node biopsy. Chemotherapy was instituted with mustard-vincristine-procarbazine-prednizone and adriamycine-bleomycine-vinblastine-dacarbazine. Remission of the lymphoma was observed with concomitant regression of the gingival overgrowth. CONCLUSIONS: The inflammatory gingival overgrowth, premature root resorption of deciduous teeth, and alveolar bone loss in this case, in conjunction with the regression of gingival overgrowth which followed the completion of chemotherapy, are strongly indicative of a paraneoplastic manifestation of HL. The postulated mechanism for the development of the manifestation is the constitutive activation of the transcription factor NF-kB. The gingival inflammatory reaction was probably further aggravated by the bacterial-stimulated cytokine secretion released by monocytes.
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keywords = resorption
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6/54. Ehlers-Danlos type VIII. review of the literature.

    Ehlers-Danlos type VIII is a rare disorder characterized by soft, hyperextensible skin, abnormal scarring, easy bruising, and generalized periodontitis with early loss of teeth. To illustrate the clinical dermatological and dental features, we present the case history of a 20-year-old patient who has suffered from poor healing of wounds at the shins and knees since childhood, which have developed into hyperpigmented atrophic scars. In the course of orthodontic treatment during the last 3 years, severe apical root resorption, gingival recession, and loss of alveolar bone were observed. family history was noncontributory for any skin or tooth disorders. The typical clinical signs confirmed the diagnosis of ehlers-danlos syndrome type VIII. As there is no specific treatment for the disorder, management is limited to the symptomatic treatment of the dental disease. It seems advisable to consider carefully the indications for orthodontic treatment in patients with Ehlers-Danlos type VIII syndrome.
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keywords = resorption
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7/54. Treatment of a mandibular molar with perforating internal resorption.

    A case is presented in which a previous partial root canal treatment on a mandibular molar developed internal resorption of the distal canal. The case was followed at the University of oklahoma student clinic and endodontic treatment completed in the mesial canals, with calcium hydroxide placed in the distal canal for 10 months due to a pre-existing perforating defect of the root surface. endodontics was then completed. A 17-month follow-up film showed osseous repair apically and also adjacent to the distal root surface where a slight overextension of filling material was evident.
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keywords = resorption
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8/54. Peripheral ameloblastoma with potentially malignant features: report of a case with special regard to its keratin profile.

    A peripheral ameloblastoma with atypical features occurring on the left maxillary alveolar ridge of 40-year-old man is described, along with an immunohistochemical profile of its cytokeratin (CK). The lesion apparently originated from the surface gingival epithelium. The tumor nests or strands were highly cellular with a variable degree of squamous differentiation and microcyst formation. Occasional mitotic figures and dystrophic calcification, both of which are not seen in conventional ameloblastomas, were also observed. The tumor infiltrated deep into the alveolar mucosa, including the periodontal ligament, and showed histological and topographical evidence of atypism, resulting in resorption of the underlying alveolar bone. On the CK immunohistochemistry, CK19 was demonstrated in all the types of neoplastic epithelia, including microcyst-forming cells, densely packed round or spindle cells within the tumor nests, cells with squamous metaplasia, and peripheral tall columnar cells. The CK immunohistochemical findings suggest the lesion's cell of odontogenic origin; they may reflect an immature phenotypic expression of cell differentiation in the odontogenic epithelia during the tumor growth in the gingival mucosa.
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keywords = resorption
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9/54. Generalized cervical root resorption associated with periodontal disease.

    BACKGROUND AND DESCRIPTION OF CASE: The etiology and pathogenesis of generalized cervical root resorptions is not well understood. In the present report, a case of severe cervical root resorption involving 24 anterior and posterior teeth is presented. The lesions developed within a period of 2 years after the patient had changed to an acid-enriched diet. They extended far into the coronal dentin and were associated with gingival inflammation and crestal bone resorption. However, no generalized clinical attachment loss had occurred. Culturing of subgingival plaque revealed the presence of several putative periodontal pathogens among which actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and porphyromonas gingivalis. Treatment consisted of mechanical debridement supported by systemic antibiotics (amoxycillin plus metronidazole) and dietary advice. RESULTS: Within 1 year after the onset of treatment, all resorptive lesions had repaired by ingrowth of a radio-opaque mineralized tissue. The crestal areas showed radiological evidence of bone repair. 3 years after the onset of therapy, one premolar was extracted and examined histologically. It appeared that irregularly-shaped masses of woven bone-like tissue had invaded into the domain of the resorbed coronal dentin and were bordered by thin layers of acellular cementum. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that, in this patient, the cervical resorptions were likely the result of an osteoclastic response extending into the roots because the root-protective role of the junctional epithelium did not develop. We hypothesize that this was due to the combined effects of a periodontopathogenic microflora and a dietary confounding factor.
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ranking = 8
keywords = resorption
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10/54. Periodontal healing in humans using anorganic bovine bone and bovine peritoneum-derived collagen membrane: a clinical and histologic case report.

    The authors report the clinical and histologic data on the healing of a severe periodontal lesion obtained in a one-walled intrabony defect using anorganic bovine bone under a bovine peritoneum-derived collagen membrane. Eight months after surgery, a bone-like tissue replaced the lost tissues. A biopsy of this tissue was carried out. In the part of the specimen closer to the residual bony wall of the original defect, anorganic bone particles (ABP) appeared to be surrounded by a layer of newly formed bone; its osteocyte lacunae were colonized by osteocytes from the host, and actively secreting osteoblasts were observed in many microscopic fields. No resorption phenomena were observed in the ABP Newly formed cementum with actively secreting cementoblasts was present on the tooth surface, and well-oriented fibers inserting in both newly formed cementum and bone were observed. In an area far from residual bone, all ABP did not appear to be surrounded by newly formed bone. Osteocytic lacunae appeared not to be colonized by cells, and ABP was surrounded by dense connective tissue without osteoblasts near the grafted particles. A very limited amount of newly formed bone, without relations with ABP, was observed close to the root surface. From a clinical point of view, anorganic bone in association with a collagen membrane can be effective in the treatment of bony defects characterized by an unfavorable architecture. From a histologic point of view, the clinical appearance of bone regeneration is not always confirmed in the part of the defect far from the bony walls.
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