Cases reported "Amebiasis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/110. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis due to naegleria fowleri: an autopsy case in japan.

    Free-living amebas represented by naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba and Balamutia have been known to cause fatal meningoencephalitis since Fowler and Carter (1965) reported the first four human cases. An autopsy case of a 25-year-old female with primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) due to naegleria fowleri is described. headache, lethargy and coma developed in this patient, and her condition progressed to death 8 days after the onset of clinical symptoms. Cerebral spinal fluid examination confirmed clusters of amebas, which were grown in culture and identified as naegleria fowleri. At autopsy, lesions were seen in the central nervous system (CNS) and the ethmoid sinus. The CNS had severe, suppurative meningoencephalitis with amebic trophozoites mingled with macrophages. This case is the first report of PAM due to naegleria fowleri in japan.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = meningoencephalitis, encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/110. Cutaneous acanthamoebiasis in AIDS.

    Acanthamoeba is a recognized pathogen in the immunocompromised patient, commonly presenting as chronic or subacute encephalitis. However, cutaneous disease in the absence of CNS involvement is increasingly recognized, especially in the setting of chronic, nonhealing skin lesions in the patient with AIDS. We describe a patient with AIDS and cutaneous acanthamoebiasis and review our experience with treatment and diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.035852569718302
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/110. Primary amoebic mengingoencephalitis contracted in a thermal tributary of the Waikato River--Taupo: a case report.

    The case history and identification of the aetiological agent of a case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis contracted from a natural thermal steam is presented. The diagnosis and treatment of suspected cases is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.28626742173035
keywords = meningoencephalitis, encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/110. A case of balamuthia mandrillaris meningoencephalitis.

    balamuthia mandrillaris is a newly described pathogen that causes granulomatous amebic encephalitis, an extremely rare clinical entity that usually occurs in immunosuppressed individuals. We report a case of pathologically proven Balamuthia encephalitis with unusual laboratory and radiologic findings. A 52-year-old woman with idiopathic seizures and a 2-year history of chronic neutropenia of unknown cause had a subacute illness with progressive lethargy, headaches, and coma and died 3 months after the onset of symptoms. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose concentrations were extremely low or unmeasurable, a feature not previously described (to our knowledge). Cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans showed a single large temporal lobe nodule, followed 6 weeks later by the appearance of 18 ring-enhancing lesions in the cerebral hemispheres that disappeared after treatment with antibiotics and high-dose corticosteroids. The initial brain biopsy specimen and analysis of CSF samples did not demonstate amebae, but a second biopsy specimen and the postmortem pathologic examination showed Balamuthia trophozoites surrounded by widespread granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis. The patient's neutropenia and antibiotic use may have caused susceptibility to this organism. Amebic meningoencephalitis should be considered in cases of subacute meningoencephalitis with greatly depressed CSF glucose concentrations and multiple nodular lesions on cerebral imaging. Arch Neurol. 2000;57:1210-1212
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.92884799657946
keywords = meningoencephalitis, encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/110. Encephalitis due to a free-living amoeba (balamuthia mandrillaris): case report with literature review.

    BACKGROUND: Amebic infections can spread to the central nervous system with a lengthy but usually fatal course. A typical case is presented to raise awareness of this increasingly reported infectious process that may have a more favorable outcome if diagnosed in its early stages. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 38-year-old male presented with an ulcerating 10 x 8 cm mass on his thigh and smaller skin nodules. In less than 6 months seizures developed due to granulomatous lesions of the brain. Biopsies/excisions of the thigh lesion, a subcutaneous nodule, and a brain lesion were performed. He failed to respond to broad spectrum antibiotics and antineoplastic agents, and died within 6 weeks of the initial MRI scan of the brain.Rare amebic trophozoites were appreciated in the biopsy specimens on post-mortem review, and balamuthia mandrillaris confirmed as the infecting agent on immunofluorescence studies. CONCLUSIONS: Granulomatous amebic encephalitis is a parasitic infection with a lengthy clinical course before rapid deterioration due to extensive brain lesions is noted. Either early treatment with antimicrobials or-in rare cases-excision of the brain lesion(s) may offer the chance of a cure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.035852569718302
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/110. Granulomatous amebic encephalitis in a patient with AIDS: isolation of acanthamoeba sp. Group II from brain tissue and successful treatment with sulfadiazine and fluconazole.

    A patient with AIDS, treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, presented with confusion, a hemifield defect, and a mass lesion in the right occipital lobe. A brain biopsy confirmed granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) due to acanthamoeba castellanii. The patient was treated with fluconazole and sulfadiazine, and the lesion was surgically excised. This is the first case of AIDS-associated GAE responding favorably to therapy. The existence of a solitary brain lesion, absence of other sites of infection, and intense cellular response in spite of a very low CD4 count conditioned the favorable outcome. We review and discuss the diagnostic microbiologic options for the laboratory diagnosis of infections due to free-living amebae.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.17926284859151
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/110. Primary meningoencephalitis by naegleria fowleri: first reported case from Mangalore, South india.

    A fatal case of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in a 5-month-old infant is described. The disease may have been contracted during bathing. The source of water was from an artificial well. The clinical presentation, the isolation of the ameba from the cerebrospinal fluid, the poor response to amphotericin b, and the ultimate fatal outcome are all consistent with the diagnosis of PAM. On the basis of its ability to grow at temperatures above 30 degrees C, the morphology of the trophozoite, and the presence of flagellate forms, the ameba was identified as naegleria fowleri. Pathogenic N. fowleri amebae were recovered from samples of water from the well. To our knowledge this case represents the second case of PAM in an infant in the absence of the history of swimming.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = meningoencephalitis, encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/110. Pediatric granulomatous cerebral amebiasis: a delayed diagnosis.

    We present four cases of cerebral amebae infection treated at our neurosurgical department. Patient 1 was a 12-year-old male with skin lesions of 2 years' progression involving the midface. He received a corticosteroid course, and, after that, he presented a right body hemiparesis. Patient 2 was a 5-year-old male, with a past surgical history of fibula fracture and osteomyelitis of 1-year evolution, associated with lesions of the surrounding skin that presented with partial seizures. Patient 3 was a 3-year-old female who presented with a stroke-like episode and with partial seizures. Patient 4 was a 6-year-old male who had ulcerative lesions in the face of 1-year evolution. After a corticosteroid course, he presented with right-body hemiparesis. All patients were human immunodeficiency virus-negative and died 1 month or less after surgery because of progressive evolution of the disease. Histopathology revealed granulomatous amebic encephalitis. All patients revealed infection from balamuthia mandrillaris (Leptomyxiidae). Treatment consisting of pentamidine, clarithromycin, fluconazole, and 5-fluorocytosine was ineffective. Although extremely uncommon, granulomatous amebic encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebral lesions while nonspecific, associated granulomatous skin lesions support the diagnosis of amebiasis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.071705139436604
keywords = encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/110. Balamuthia amebic encephalitis: radiographic and pathologic findings.

    The radiographic findings of two patients (one, a rare survivor) with meningoencephalitis caused by balamuthia mandrillaris are presented with pathologic correlation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.28626742173035
keywords = meningoencephalitis, encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/110. An autopsy case of amebic meningoencephalitis. The first Japanese case caused by balamuthia mandrillaris.

    We report here the first case of amebic meningoencephalitis caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris in a 78-year-old Japanese woman with sjogren's syndrome. Fourteen days before her death, she presented with high fever and lost consciousness and later developed neck stiffness and abducens palsy. Computed tomography scans of the brain demonstrated multiple low-density areas throughout the brain. Neuropathologically, hemorrhagic and necrotic lesions with many amebic trophozoites were scattered in the brain and spinal cord. Granulomatous lesions were only rarely found. The amebas were identified as balamuthia mandrillaris based on immunofluorescence assay. Clinicopathologically, our case was thought to be an intermediate between primary amebic meningoencephalitis due to Negleria fowleri and granulomatous amebic encephalitis due to Acanthameba species. Essentially, the case was one of an elderly person with suspected immunodeficiency with fulminant necrotic meningoencephalitis and scanty granulomatous lesions of 14 days course.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.0358525697183
keywords = meningoencephalitis, encephalitis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Amebiasis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.