Cases reported "Amputation, Traumatic"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/92. Sideswipe elbow fractures.

    A retrospective review of all cases of sideswipe elbow fractures (SSEFs) treated at two community hospitals from 1982 to 1992 was conducted to determine the functional outcome of the operative treatment of SSEFs. All five injuries involved the left elbow, and they included open fractures of the olecranon, the radius and ulna, the ulna and humerus, the humerus, and traumatic amputation of the arm. Concomitant injuries included three radial nerve palsies and two injuries each to the median nerve, ulnar nerve, and brachial artery. Treatment included irrigation, debridement (repeated if necessary), open reduction and internal fixation, external fixation (one case), and delayed amputation (one case). An average of 130/-10 degrees elbow flexion/extension, and 60/60 degrees supination/pronation was obtained for the three of four patients with reconstructions who returned for follow-up.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/92. thumb reconstruction with a wrap-around free flap according to the level of amputation.

    In 1980, Morrison and O'Brien reported their experiences with the reconstruction of an amputated thumb using a wrap-around neurovascular free flap from the great toe, but its indication has been limited distal to the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint (Morrison et al., J hand Surg 5:575-583, 1980). We have performed 37 wrap-around free flaps from the great toe for the reconstruction of thumbs amputated at distal or proximal to the MP joint and investigated their functional results according to the level of amputation. The amputation was distal and proximal to the MP joint in 25 and 12 cases, respectively. Pinching and grasping power, two-point discrimination, and the amount of opposition to the other fingers were compared to the uninjured hand. Pinching and grasping power were not significantly different according to the level of amputation but the results of two-point discrimination was better in the cases amputated proximal to the MP joint. The opposition of reconstructed thumb to the other fingers was completely possible in all cases amputated distal to the MP joint. In the 12 cases amputated proximal to the MP joint of the thumb, opposition was completely possible in 6 cases in which the iliac bone block was fixated in the position of 30 degrees flexion and 45 degrees internal rotation. However, in the other six cases in the fixation of 30 degrees flexion and 30 degrees internal rotation, the opposition of the reconstructed thumb to the ring and little fingers was impossible in five cases and only to the little finger in one case. In this study, we concluded that amputation proximal to the MP joint is not an absolute contraindication to the wrap-around free flap procedure for thumb reconstruction. However, for a better functional outcome, we recommend iliac bone block fixation in the position of 30 degrees flexion and 45 degrees internal rotation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.17691598221056
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/92. replantation of an avulsive amputation of a foot after recovering the foot from the sea.

    A foot avulsion case, with the dismembered body part submerged in sea water for 1 hour, is presented. This report is unique in that it is the first to document the reattachment of a body part that had been submerged in sea water. It was not known how salt-water exposure would affect wound management. Differences in osmolarity and bacterial flora between the sea water and foot tissues have not caused any problems, and the patient has not suffered any vascular or infectious complications after replantation. Neurotization of the plantar surface by the tibial nerve, which was stripped off during amputation and replaced in its original traces, was the most critical part of convalescence. After management of such an interesting case, we conclude that exposure to sea water of the dismembered part should not be a contraindication for replantation surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/92. Double-toe transplantation following temporary insertion of a block of silicone for reconstruction of a traumatic metacarpal defect.

    The treatment of the mutilated hand with more than one digit missing and a metacarpal defect is challenging. We used double-toe transfer after temporary insertion of a block of silicone to fill the bony defect.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.44228995552641
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/92. Sixty-four cases of thumb and finger reconstruction using transplantation of the big toe skin-nail flap combined with the second toe or the second and third toes.

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the results of thumb and finger reconstruction using transplantation of the big toe wraparound flap combined with the second toe or the second and third toes. Between August of 1981 and December of 1998, in a series of 64 cases involving 58 patients with digitless hands, either (1) the thumb and index fingers were reconstructed by transplantation of a big toe wraparound flap combined with the adjacent second toe harvested from the ipsilateral foot; or (2) the thumb, index, and long fingers were reconstructed by transplantation of an ipsilateral big toe wraparound flap combined with the adjacent second and third toes. The phalanx of the new thumb was usually an iliac block. The success rate of this series was 92.2 percent. At long-term follow-up, the average static 2-point discrimination was less than 10 mm. The distance between the tip of the new thumb and the new index finger ranged from 6 to 10 cm (average, 8 cm). Opposition action was nimble and forceful. The patients could lift a 6- to 12-kg weight with their reconstructed digits. All patients were satisfied with their new hands and were able to use them in their daily activities. The transplants for reconstructing the thumb and fingers are harvested from the same foot in a procedure known as one-foot donation. Function of the bilateral digitless hand can be recovered with this procedure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.088457991105282
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/92. A reverse ulnar hypothenar flap for finger reconstruction.

    A reverse-flow island flap from the hypothenar eminence of the hand was applied in 11 patients to treat palmar skin defects, amputation injuries, or flexion contractures of the little finger. There were three female and eight male patients, and their ages at the time of surgery averaged 46 years. A 3 x 1.5 to 5 X 2 cm fasciocutaneous flap from the ulnar aspect of the hypothenar eminence, which was located over the abductor digiti minimi muscle, was designed and transferred in a retrograde fashion to cover the skin and soft-tissue defects of the little finger. The flap was based on the ulnar palmar digital artery of the little finger and in three patients was sensated by the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve or by branches of the ulnar palmar digital nerve of the little finger. Follow-up periods averaged 42 months. The postoperative course was uneventful for all patients, and all of the flaps survived without complications. The donor site was closed primarily in all cases, and no patient complained of significant donor-site problems. Satisfactory sensory reinnervation was achieved in patients who underwent sensory flap transfer, as indicated by 5 mm of moving two-point discrimination. A reverse island flap from the hypothenar eminence is easily elevated, contains durable fasciocutaneous structures, and has a good color and texture match to the finger pulp. This flap is a good alternative for reconstruction of palmar skin and soft-tissue defects of the little finger.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/92. Cortical reorganization after digit-to-hand replantation.

    Functional recovery after digit-to-hand replantation depends on the interaction of various factors. In addition to peripheral mechanisms, cortical and subcortical reorganization of digit representation may play a substantial role in the recovery process. However, cortical processes during the first months after replantation are not well understood. In this 25-year-old man who had traumatically lost digits II to V (DII-V) on his right hand, the authors used magnetoencephalographic source imaging to document the recovery of somatosensory cortical responses after tactile stimulation at four sites on the replanted digits. Successful replantation of DIV and DV was accomplished at the original position of DIII and DIV with mixed innervation. Cortical evoked fields could be recorded starting from the 10th week after digit-to-hand replantation. Initially, signals from all sites showed decreased amplitudes and prolonged latencies. In the subsequent six recordings obtained between the 12th and 55th week postreplantation, a continuous increase in amplitude but only a slight recovery of latencies were observed. Components of the recorded somatosensory evoked fields were localized in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI). The localizations of the replanted DIV showed a gradual lateral-inferior shift in the somatosensory cortex over time, indicating cortical reorganization caused by altered peripheral input. The authors infer from this shift that the original cortical area of the missing finger (DII) was taken over by the replanted finger. From these data the authors conclude that magnetic source imaging might be a reliable noninvasive method to evaluate surgical nerve repair and that cortical reorganization of SI is involved in the regeneration process following peripheral nerve injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/92. replantation of large segments in children.

    If one looks at the final results obtained in children, one should conclude that replantation of large segments is more often indicated in children than in adult patients. Nevertheless, the more common components of crush or avulsion and the frequent severe associated lesions must restrain the surgeon's enthusiasm when indicating replantation of a large segment in children. The possible dramatic consequences of a late revascularization syndrome can be easily foreseen as an outcome of replantation of a large segment in children. Moreover, the problem of growth must be faced from the start, programming secondary surgery either for soft tissue assessment (skin retraction treatments, tendon lengthening, muscle sliding) or for bone lengthening. The final outcome being a functional arm, special care has to be taken in nerve repair integrated with possible secondary tendon transfers to compensate the functional deficit. With all these limitations in indications, care in emergency, and correct timing and planning for secondary surgery, the final functional results of macroreplantations in children will certainly be improved.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/92. Reversed dorsal digital and metacarpal island flaps supplied by the dorsal cutaneous branches of the palmar digital artery.

    The dorsal digital and metacarpal island flaps have been described for use in a variety of clinical situations. On the basis of the authors' previous angiographic studies, these two skin flaps were planned on the dorsum of the proximal phalanx or intermetacarpal space based on the vascular anastomoses between the proximal dorsal cutaneous branches of the palmar digital artery and the dorsal digital branches of the dorsal metacarpal artery at the level of the proximal phalanx. The authors present a series of 13 patients using these flaps. To reconstruct the injured finger pulp, the reverse dorsal digital flap was used in 5 patients, and the reverse dorsal metacarpal flap was used in 8 patients. Most of the 13 patients sustained a work-related injury. Associated injuries of bone, joint, or tendon occurred in most patients. In all patients, the skin defect was located distal to the proximal interphalangeal joint. The skin paddle was taken from the dorsal aspect of the middle and ring fingers or the first, second, third, and fourth metacarpal area. All flaps survived completely. Two patients who had the dorsal branch of the sensitive radial nerve anastomosed to the digital nerve recovered 6-mm two-point discrimination in the reverse dorsal digital flap. The results of this anatomic study and the authors' clinical experience confirm the reliability of the dorsal digital and metacarpal island flaps.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/92. Fingertip replantation at or distal to the nail base: use of the technique of artery-only anastomosis.

    The authors describe the functional and aesthetic results of microsurgical replantation of 21 fingertip amputations at or distal to the nail base-namely, zone I amputations. There were 15 male and 6 female patients, with an average age of 26 years (age range, 1-41 years). Replantations were performed using the anastomosis of the artery-only technique, with neither vein nor nerve repair. Venous drainage was provided by an external bleeding method with a fish-mouth incision in "distal" zone I amputations for approximately 7 days, and by the use of leeches in more "proximal" zone I amputations for 10 to 12 days. Results indicated that the overall survival rate was 76%, with 16 of 21 digits surviving. Sensory evaluation at an average follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-18 months) revealed an average static two-point discrimination of 6.1 mm (range, 2.0-8.0 mm). Considering the unfavorable results and the donor site morbidity of various fingertip reconstructions, a microsurgical fingertip replantation should always be considered except in extremely distal, clean-cut, pediatric cases, in which case a composite graft is a possibility. The results of this series indicate that an amputated fingertip in zone I can be salvaged successfully by microvascular anastomosis of the artery only, with a nonmicrosurgical method of venous drainage. Furthermore, acceptable sensory recovery can be expected without any nerve coaptation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Amputation, Traumatic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.