Cases reported "Aneurysm, Dissecting"

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11/37. Percutaneous fenestration of dissecting intima with a transseptal needle. A new therapeutic technique for visceral ischemia complicating acute aortic dissection.

    Noncardiac visceral ischemia is a major complication with acute aortic dissection and is caused by obstruction of the major visceral arteries by dissecting intima. Two patients with this condition underwent emergency percutaneous fenestration of dissecting intima, and the blood flow to the lower extremity and kidney was restored. A transseptal needle and peripheral angioplasty balloon catheter were used for fenestration. There were no associated complications in either patient. One patient was treated medically and another had ascending aortic replacement surgery the day after percutaneous fenestration. Clinical follow-up of 10 and 5 months, respectively, revealed good clinical outcomes. Percutaneous fenestration should be considered the treatment of choice for visceral ischemia due to acute aortic dissection.
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12/37. Asymmetric abnormality of renal perfusion with symmetric function in aortic dissection.

    Two cases of aortic dissection are presented in which discordance between renal perfusion and function has been demonstrated with Tc-99m DTPA. Renal perfusion on the affected side was decreased on blood flow imaging, whereas renal function, including parenchymal accumulation and excretion assessed by subsequent sequential imaging, were similar for both kidneys. These results suggest that blood flow imaging more readily demonstrates a unilateral renal abnormality in patients with aortic dissection.
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13/37. Sudden death caused by dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Among the fatal vascular complications associated with autosomal dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD), ruptured intracerebral aneurysm and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm are widely known. However, there are few reports on the dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm as a fatal complication of ADPKD. We report a case of a 58-year-old man with a history of ADPKD who presented to the emergency department with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation restored a spontaneous circulation successfully and subsequent image study revealed a type I dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm. Emergency aortic grafting was performed--but he died from postoperative haemorrhage. The surgical specimen of the aorta showed cystic medial necrosis. This rare case emphasizes the need to consider such a diagnosis in a patient with ADPKD who presents to the emergency department with sudden cardiac arrest. In addition, the histological finding indicates the aetiological role of a collagen defect in addition to chronic hypertension in the pathogenesis of aortic dissection in ADPKD patients.
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keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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14/37. The coexistence of acute aortic dissection with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease--description of two hypertensive patients.

    BACKGROUND: Acute aortic dissection is a rare but potentially lethal disease characterized by high early mortality when left untreated. However, survival may be significantly improved by the timely institution of appropriate medical and/or surgical therapy. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common hereditary disorders, accounting for 8-10% of the cases of end-stage renal disease. hypertension occurs frequently and is an early manifestation of ADPKD in approximately 50-70% of non-azotemic patients. ADPKD, often caused by mutations in the PKD1 gene, is associated with life-threatening vascular abnormalities that are commonly attributed to the frequent occurrence of hypertension. methods: We present two cases of hypertensive patients with acute aortic dissection (type A Stanford) coexisting with ADPKD. RESULTS: A 54-year-old male hypertensive patient and a 47-year-old male hypertensive patient, both with known ADPKD were diagnosed and operated with acute dissection of ascending aorta. Both patients were characterized by severe hypertension; therefore, in both cases, degree of hypertension is likely to be causative for this vascular complication. However, since ADPKD is associated with the vascular complications mentioned above, abnormality of the structure of the arterial wall of the thoracic aorta cannot be ruled out. CONCLUSION: Aortic dissection is a rare but potentially disastrous complication, and clinicians should always consider this when dealing with patients with ADPKD who present with chest pain or collapse.
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ranking = 359.1448926123
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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15/37. Spontaneous rupture of a left gastroepiploic artery aneurysm in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) has been known to be associated with a variety of vascular diseases. We present a hemodialysis patient with ADPKD who died of a massive intraperitoneal hemorrhage caused by the spontaneous rupture of a left gastroepiploic artery aneurysm. A 64-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with acute upper abdominal pain and hemorrhagic shock. An abdominal angiography showed three aneurysms and the source of hemorrhage was assumed to be the left gastroepiploic artery aneurysm. The patient died of severe metabolic acidosis and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) on the second hospital day. At autopsy, there was massive bleeding into the abdominal cavity, and pathological examination of the left gastroepiploic artery aneurysm revealed a dissecting aneurysm. This is the first case describing a rupture of a gastroepiploic aneurysm in a patient with ADPKD.
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ranking = 359.1448926123
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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16/37. renal artery stent placement complicated by development of a Type B aortic dissection.

    Percutaneous renal artery angioplasty and stent placement have demonstrated safety and effectiveness in the treatment of selected patients with renovascular hypertension and ischemic nephropathy. Major complications have been predominantly confined to the affected renal artery and kidneys, including renal artery dissection and/or thrombosis, distal embolization, and contrast-related nephropathy. We report a case in which treatment of an ostial renal artery lesion with placement of a balloon-expandable stent was complicated by the development of an acute Type B aortic dissection.
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17/37. Spontaneous recovery from renal infarction resulting from renal artery dissection.

    A 31-year-old, previously normotensive healthy man developed right flank pain and was admitted to a medical service. Right renal infarction was suspected by enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) and arteriography. Fourteen days after the onset, he was transferred to the Oita University Hospital, Oita, japan. Renal angiography revealed an isolated renal artery dissection causing renal atrophy due to main stem narrowing of the right renal artery. Renogram and renal scintigram with (99m)Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid revealed a remarkable decline in the glomerular filtration rate and almost no uptake in the right kidney. Four months later, in spite of our belief that functional recovery could not be expected, intravenous pyelography and enhanced abdominal CT scans revealed a functioning right kidney that had spontaneously recovered from the renal artery dissection through conservative management.
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keywords = kidney
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18/37. Long-term results of blunt traumatic renal artery dissection treated by endovascular stenting.

    A 20-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department after falling 15 m onto the roof of a car and landing on his back. Imaging by computed tomography (CT) showed delayed perfusion of the right kidney and no excretion of contrast from that kidney on delayed images. angiography confirmed a localized intimal dissection in the right main renal artery. We inserted a balloon-expandable stent using a transfemoral approach to successfully repair the dissection. At 4 year follow-up, Doppler ultrasound of the right renal artery and renal scintigraphy demonstrated preserved function of the right kidney. Our findings support endovascular stenting as a safe, effective and efficient treatment for blunt renal artery injury.
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keywords = kidney
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19/37. A case of acute abdominal aortic dissection caused by blunt trauma.

    We present the case of an 18-year-old man involved in a fall with blunt abdominal trauma. The patient had hypovolemic shock and findings of an acute abdomen. Initial computed tomography (CT) showed pulmonary contusion, pneumohemothorax, hemoperitoneum, hepatic contusion, right kidney laceration and vascular avulsion, rupture of the mesenteric vein, rupture of the right rectus muscle with bowel hernia, and infrarenal aortic dissection. There were no signs of limb or medullar ischemia. After hemodynamic stabilization and surgical repair of the associated lesions, the dissection was successfully treated with a self-expanding aortic Wallstent. Postprocedure CT showed a well-positioned patent stent and the patient was discharged asymptomatic. Percutaneous endovascular stent implantation is minimally invasive and seems to be a safe treatment for traumatic dissection of the abdominal aorta.
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20/37. Aortic dissection and bicuspid aortic valve: an autopsy study.

    Medico-legal post-mortems referred to the Department of pathology, for the histopathological examination, revealed six cases of acute aortic dissection--two in isolation, three in combination with congenital bicuspid aortic valve; and one isolated case of congenital bicuspid aortic valve. One case of isolated aortic dissection was associated with Marfan's syndrome; and one case of aortic dissection with bicuspid aortic valve was associated with polycystic kidneys. history of hypertension could be elicited in two cases. Cystic medial degeneration of aorta was seen in three cases; one of which was associated with Marfan's syndrome. All five cases of aortic dissection belonged to type II of DeBakey classification.
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