Cases reported "Aneurysm, Infected"

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1/12. Successful treatment of a ruptured mycotic aneurysm of the ileocolic artery with transcatheter embolization and antibiotic therapy.

    We report a case of mycotic aneurysm of the ileocolic artery due to streptococcus bovis endocarditis and acute septicemia complicated by active hemorrhage, that was treated successfully with transcatheter embolization and subsequent intravenous antibiotic treatment. This case suggests that a mycotic aneurysm can be treated successfully by percutaneous embolization in an emergent situation (active bleeding, septicemia) even without previous antibiotic therapy.
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keywords = bovis
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2/12. Relapsing melioidosis as cause of iliac mycotic aneurysm: an indigenous case in taiwan.

    melioidosis, an infectious disease caused by burkholderia pseudomallei, an aerobic gram-negative bacillus, is normally transmitted through skin wounds and contact with infected human beings and animals. Its primary source is rice paddy soil and stagnant water. melioidosis manifesting as an arterial mycotic aneurysm is rare, and, to our knowledge, infected true and false aneurysms of the iliac artery have never been reported. We report the case of a patient without contact with the normal sources of infection in whom an iliac mycotic aneurysm was caused by relapsing melioidosis and treated with an extra-anatomic bypass graft.
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ranking = 0.84062732004695
keywords = bacillus
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3/12. Tuberculous abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm penetrating the left psoas muscle after BCG therapy for bladder cancer.

    We describe a case of a 75-year-old man with abdominal aortic and right femoral tuberculous pseudoaneurysms 32 months after intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy for bladder cancer. These aneurysms were probably brought on by systemic infection by mycobacterium bovis. The infrarenal aorta and right common femoral artery were successfully replaced with an in situ expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft.Tuberculous pseudoaneurysm after bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy for malignancy is very rare, and we review the related literature.
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ranking = 2.6812546400939
keywords = bovis, bacillus
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4/12. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to tuberculous spondylitis.

    A 69-year-old man was admitted with low back pain and signs of nerve root compression. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed abscess formation in the left psoas region, spondylodiscitis L3-L4 and a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aortic aneurysm was replaced with a bifurcated vascular graft. One week later, laminectomy at the L4-level was done. In a small abscess, mycobacterium bovis was found. The condition was considered to be a mycobacterial spondylitis secondary to BCG instillations of the urinary bladder for carcinoma. The patient received antituberculous medication for 9 months. Subsequently bone transplantation and internal fixation of the spine became necessary. Three years after surgery he is in good condition and there are no signs of graft infection on CT. spondylitis and mycotic aortic aneurysm should be kept in mind in patients who have been treated for carcinoma of the bladder with BCG instillations.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bovis
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5/12. Human immunodeficiency virus and infected aneurysm of the abdominal aorta: report of three cases.

    Three patients who were seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus underwent surgery for infected aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. fever and abdominal pain were the principal presenting clinical features. None of the patients had any opportunistic infections or endocarditis. In two cases, a ruptured aneurysm was demonstrated radiographically. In the remaining case, sonograms were diagnostic. The organisms responsible were salmonella, Hemophilus influenzae, and mycobacterium tuberculosis. In two cases, the infectious origin was evidenced by bacteriologic examination of the aortic wall, which revealed the presence of salmonella enteritidis and Koch's bacillus. Although Hemophilus influenzae was not found in the aortic wall of the remaining case, the infectious origin of the aneurysm was established because preoperative blood cultures were positive for this pathogen, and pathohistologic examination of the specimen showed destruction associated with leukocyte infiltration of the aneurysmal wall. An in situ prosthetic graft replacement protected by omentum was performed in all three cases. Antibiotic therapy was continued for several weeks. All patients are well with follow-up ranging from 10 to 21 months. Infectious aneurysm associated with human immunodeficiency virus seropositivity results in bacterial infestation of an atheromatous aorta. Infected phenomena are promoted by cellular immunodeficiency. Surgery was justified in these cases because of the immediate threat of rupture.
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ranking = 0.84062732004695
keywords = bacillus
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6/12. Mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm induced by immunotherapy with bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccine for malignancy.

    Successful surgical treatment of a mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm infected with mycobacterium bovis is described. The infecting organism can be traced to an intraneoplastic injection of bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine into a cutaneous malignant melanoma nodule 14 months before aneurysm detection (17 months before operation). Treatment consisted of aneurysm excision, in situ prosthetic graft placement, and antituberculous medications. This patient represents the first reported case of BCG-induced mycotic aortic aneurysm.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bovis
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7/12. Computed tomography and ultrasound diagnosis of mycotic aneurysm of the abdominal aorta due to Salmonella.

    The case of a 56 year old diabetic Chinese male, with a Salmonella bovismorbificans (serogroup C) mycotic aneurysm of the abdominal aorta is presented. The lesion was seen by computed tomography and ultrasound and the patient was successfully treated by primary resection, debridement and grafting. Computed tomography criteria for the diagnosis of mycotic aneurysms of the abdominal aorta are discussed. Ultrasound identified the aortic aneurysm correctly but was unable to demonstrate the associated psoas abscess in this case.
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keywords = bovis
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8/12. campylobacter fetus sepsis with mycotic aortic aneurysm.

    campylobacter fetus is a fastidious, curved, Gram-negative bacillus that has been increasingly associated with human disease. To our knowledge, we are reporting the first documented case of C fetus sepsis associated with an aortic mycotic aneurysm. Typical of previously reported cases of infections caused by this organism, this case involved a debilitated patient who was seen initially with a subacute febrile illness associated with bacteremia, but who died suddenly when the unsuspected aneurysm ruptured. The isolate was presumptively identified by its growth characteristics, motility, curved shape, and the presence of a single polar flagellum.
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ranking = 0.84062732004695
keywords = bacillus
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9/12. actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans endocarditis in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    We report a case of bacterial endocarditis due to actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in a man with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy complicated by a mycotic aneurysm and thrombosis of the right common iliac artery. The patient was successfully treated with a combination of ampicillin and gentamicin, but was left with residual mitral incompetence.
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ranking = 4.2031366002347
keywords = bacillus
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10/12. endarteritis and mycotic aortic aneurysm caused by an oral strain of actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from blood cultures of a 33-year-old febrile patient with a previously undiagnosed coarctation of the aorta. Subgingival samples from diseased periodontal pockets revealed the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. An infected (mycotic) aortic aneurysm and endarteritis were diagnosed and surgically treated. The identity of blood and oral clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans was supported by genetic analysis, including fingerprinting by restriction fragment length polymorphism, ribotyping, and random amplified polymorphic dna; biotyping; and antibiogram typing. These data strongly suggest that the periodontal pockets were the primary source of A. actinomycetemcomitans endarteritis in this case.
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ranking = 4.2031366002347
keywords = bacillus
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