Cases reported "Aneurysm, Ruptured"

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1/271. Ruptured aneurysm of the ductus diverticulum into the pulmonary artery in a man: a successful repair.

    Aneurysm of the ductus diverticulum in the adult is rare and its rupture is fatal. A 75-year-old man presented with congestive heart failure that suddenly occurred with a continuous murmur. Angiography showed a left-to-right shunt through a large thrombosed aneurysm of the ductus diverticulum (6 cm), and the pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio was 2.6. Patch closure of the orifice (3x4 cm) of the aneurysm and repair of the perforated pulmonary artery were done emergently under hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with selective cerebral perfusion. He recovered uneventfully. Early recognition and early intervention should be indicated in this otherwise fatal condition.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
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2/271. Intra-arterial infusion of fasudil hydrochloride for treating vasospasm following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    In this pilot study we treated cerebral vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage to assess intra-arterial fasudil hydrochloride. We analysed effects of intra-arterial infusion on angiographically evident cerebral vasospasm in 10 patients including 3 with symptoms of vasospasm. Over 10 to 30 min 15 to 60 mg was administered via the proximal internal carotid artery or vertebral artery following standard angiography, without superselective techniques. A total of 24 arterial territories (21 internal carotid, 3 vertebral) were treated. Angiographic improvement of vasospasm was demonstrated in 16 arterial territories (local dilation in 2, diffuse dilation in 14) in 9 patients. In 2 symptomatic patients, intra-arterial fasudil hydrochloride was associated with resolution of symptoms without sequelae. In the third symptomatic patient the benefit of fasudil hydrochloride was only temporary, and a large cerebral infarction occurred. All asymptomatic patients showed no progression of angiographic to symptomatic vasospasm after treatment with intra-arterial fasudil hydrochloride. No adverse effect was encountered.
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ranking = 3
keywords = cerebral
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3/271. Endovascular treatment of ruptured, peripheral cerebral aneurysms: parent artery occlusion with short Guglielmi detachable coils.

    We report two cases of distal cerebral aneurysms that were treated by parent artery occlusion with short Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs). One patient had a presumed mycotic aneurysm of the distal left posterior cerebral artery, and the other had a partially clipped aneurysm of the distal right anterior inferior cerebellar artery that had hemorrhaged. Short GDCs allow controlled, accurate occlusion of the parent artery at the aneurysmal neck.
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ranking = 6
keywords = cerebral
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4/271. De novo formation of familial cerebral aneurysms: case report.

    OBJECTIVES: The factors regulating the formation and growth of cerebral aneurysms are poorly understood. We report the case of a patient whose grandfather had a cerebral aneurysm and who developed numerous de novo aneurysms of varying size 9 years after the treatment of a first aneurysm. This observation sheds light on the cause and growth of cerebral aneurysms in familial cases that may be pertinent to sporadic cases. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 58-year-old man was admitted to the Montreal Neurological Institute in 1956 for an ultimately fatal, autopsy-proven, ruptured internal carotid artery aneurysm. His granddaughter was first admitted to the same institution in 1984 after suffering a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured right terminal internal carotid artery aneurysm that was successfully treated. Four-vessel cerebral angiography did not reveal other aneurysms. The granddaughter was readmitted to the hospital 9 years later after a new, lumbar puncture-proven subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred. cerebral angiography demonstrated that the previously clipped aneurysm did not fill. However, five new aneurysms were present. INTERVENTION: An anterior communicating artery aneurysm, thought to be the one that bled, was surgically clipped, and a large right posterior communicating artery aneurysm was coiled endovascularly. The remaining, smaller aneurysms were left untreated. CONCLUSION: The appearance of five new aneurysms during a 9-year interval suggests that there may be a genetic factor operating in the development of cerebral aneurysms in families and that this may produce a more widespread cerebral arteriopathy than is generally appreciated. patients with treated cerebral aneurysms from families in which two or more individuals have cerebral aneurysms, and perhaps their first and second degree relatives who have had negative angiograms, should be considered for periodic follow-up cerebrovascular imaging to rule out the subsequent development of de novo aneurysms.
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ranking = 12
keywords = cerebral
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5/271. Intraoperative use of nitric oxide during intracranial aneurysm clipping in a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    We describe a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and cerebral vasospasm. Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) was used to improve oxygenation, thereby facilitating cerebral aneurysm clipping.
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ranking = 2
keywords = cerebral
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6/271. Intracerebral hemorrhage caused by the rupture of a nontraumatic middle meningeal artery aneurysm. Case report and review of the literature.

    The authors report on the case of a 46-year-old man who presented with an intraparenchymal hemorrhage after the rupture of a nontraumatic aneurysm arising from the middle meningeal artery (MMA). A review of the literature revealed no published cases of intraparenchymal hemorrhage resulting from the rupture of an MMA aneurysm.
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ranking = 4
keywords = cerebral
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7/271. Angioarchitecture related to hemorrhage in cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    A retrospective study was conducted to determine the angioarchitecture related to hemorrhage in patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), who underwent conservative treatment and long-term follow-up. The average observation period was 9.3 years, and the annual bleeding rate was estimated at 3.6%. In all cases angiographic findings were reviewed in detail. The average AVM grade by Spetzler-Martin was 3.5. Higher bleeding rate was observed in large AVM (5.4%) compared with small (2.1%) or medium AVM (2.9%). Deep venous drainage (8.6%/year) was strongly correlated to hemorrhage. Concerning location of nidus, hemorrhage was frequently found in insular, callosal, and cerebellar AVMs. Venous ectasia, feeder aneurysm, and external carotid supply were commonly demonstrated on angiograms. Comparison of annual bleeding rate revealed that AVMs with intranidal aneurysm (8.5%) and venous stenosis (5.5%) had a high propensity to hemorrhage. Therapeutic strategy should be focused on these potentially hazardous lesions by the use of endovascular embolization or stereotactic radiosurgery, even if surgical resection is not indicated.
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ranking = 5
keywords = cerebral
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8/271. Sudden death in an infant caused by rupture of a basilar artery aneurysm.

    Ruptured aneurysms of the cerebrovasculature in infancy and early childhood, except for "giant" aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations, are rare. seizures, loss of consciousness, and apnea are the usual presenting signs in infancy; symptoms such as headache or visual disturbances and signs such as cranial nerve compression or meningeal irritation commonly found in older children or adults are absent in infants. However, the morphologic findings (i.e., subarachnoid and retinal hemorrhage, and occasionally subdural hemorrhage) may be mistaken for inflicted trauma, especially if the aneurysm is not identified. Sudden death caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm has not been previously described in an infant. This report outlines the investigation and autopsy findings in a 7-month-old infant who died unexpectedly as a result of rupture of a complex basilar artery aneurysm.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
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9/271. anesthesia for ruptured cerebral aneurysm surgery associated with chronic renal failure.

    The management of patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) undergoing cerebral aneurysm surgery has been documented on only a few occasions. We report a 58-year-old man with CRF and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture. We describe the patient's perioperative anesthetic management, discussing the current methods for maintaining an appropriate cerebral perfusion pressure and for preventing rehemorrhage from the aneurysm. We suggest that heparin-aided hemodialysis be avoided in these cases.
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ranking = 6
keywords = cerebral
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10/271. Application of a rigid endoscope to the microsurgical management of 54 cerebral aneurysms: results in 48 patients.

    OBJECT: To enhance visual confirmation of regional anatomy, endoscopy was introduced during microsurgery for cerebral aneurysms. The risks and benefits are analyzed in the present study. methods: The endoscopic technique was used during microsurgery for 54 aneurysms in 48 patients. Forty-three aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 11 were in the posterior circulation. Thirty-eight aneurysms (70.4%) had not ruptured. All ruptured aneurysms in the present series produced Hunt and Hess Grade I or II subarachnoid hemorrhage. After initial exposure achieved with the aid of a microscope, the rigid endoscope was introduced to confirm the regional anatomy, including the aneurysm neck and adjacent structures. The necks of 43 aneurysms were clipped using microscopic control or simultaneous microscopic/endoscopic control. After clipping, the positions of the clip and nearby structures were inspected using the endoscope. Use of the neuroendoscope provided useful information that further clarified the regional anatomy in 44 cases (81.5%) either before or after neck clipping. In nine cases (16.7%), these details were available only with the use of the endoscope. In five cases (9.3%), the surgeons reapplied the clip on the basis of endoscopic information obtained after the initial clipping. There were two cases in which surgical complications were possibly related to the endoscopic procedures (one patient with asymptomatic cerebral contusion and another with transient oculomotor palsy). CONCLUSIONS: It is the authors' impression that the use of the endoscope in the microsurgical management of cerebral aneurysms enhanced the safety and reliability of the surgery. However, there is a prerequisite for the surgeon to be familiar with this instrumentation and fully prepared for the risks and inconveniences of endoscopic procedures.
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ranking = 7
keywords = cerebral
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