Cases reported "Aneurysm"

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1/32. Scintigraphic examination of aneurysms of abdominal aorta and iliac arteries.

    The use of a radionuclide (99Tcm-pertechnetate) for the diagnosis of aortic and iliac aneurysms is described. The method is rapid, harmless for the patient and is performed without puncture of arteries. The extent of the aneurysm and the perfusion of the kidneys can be visualized. The method is well suited for differential diagnosis and for postoperative control. Some illustrative cases are described.
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2/32. Repair of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysm by potentially reversible, unilateral internal iliac artery embolisation followed by endovascular Y-stenting.

    Bilateral common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms are rare, but more frequently symptomatic than abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In elderly patients with coexisting medical problems, transluminal and/or endovascular procedures are preferred to avoid the risk of morbidity and mortality associated with further general anesthesia and surgery. However, bilateral internal iliac artery (IIA) occlusion during endovascular repair might be associated with significant morbidity, including gluteal claudicatio, and ischemia of the sigmoid colon and perineum. In the presented case report we describe the successful repair of bilateral CIA aneurysms by a total transluminal and endovascular approach. The potentially reversible embolisation of the less diseased IIA with detachable latex balloons preceded the implantation of a bilateral endovascular Y-stent. Both CIA aneurysms were successfully excluded from circulation. No complications were noted and the patient could be discharged four days after surgery. Probationary detachable balloon embolisation of the IIA followed by implantation of an endovascular bifurcated stentgraft is a safe technique. It allows clinical monitoring of acute ischemic complications before bilateral IIA occlusion by the stentgraft. In comparison to coil embolisation these balloons may be easier to remove if for instance, an external-internal iliac artery bypass is needed. Percutaneous balloon puncture might be another option to reverse acute ischemia.
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3/32. Saccular aneurysm in arm secondary to accidental arterial puncture.

    We present a rare case of saccular aneurysm localised in the arm of a breast-feeding baby, secondary to accidental arterial puncture. Colour Doppler echography showed a cystic lesion with turbulent arterial flow related to the humeral artery. Complete surgical resection of the aneurysm was achieved.
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4/32. Direct aneurysm puncture and coil occlusion: a new approach to peripancreatic arterial pseudoaneurysms.

    A patient with pancreatitis complicated by a pseudoaneurysm in the pancreatic head was treated with a radiologic-surgical approach. At surgery, the phlegmon was exposed and treated by means of direct puncture and embolization with Gianturco coils under color Doppler flow imaging guidance.
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5/32. reperfusion of splanchnic artery aneurysm following transcatheter embolization: treatment with percutaneous thrombin injection.

    We describe a case of reperfusion of an aneurysm of the pancreaticoduodenal artery following transcatheter coil embolotherapy. The lesion was successfully treated by direct puncture of the aneurysm under computed tomographic guidance, followed by injection of thrombin. This technique is useful when an endovascular approach is not feasible.
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keywords = puncture
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6/32. Elevated intracranial pressure associated with idiopathic retinal vasculitis, aneurysms, and neuroretinitis syndrome.

    The idiopathic retinal vasculitis, aneurysms, and neuroretinitis (IRVAN) syndrome typically occurs in young patients and may produce multiple retinal macroaneurysms, neuroretinitis, and peripheral capillary nonperfusion. Optic disc edema has been described, but elevated intracranial pressure has not been previously documented. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with bilateral disc swelling and peripapillary hemorrhage. brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was normal, but lumbar puncture yielded an opening pressure of 360 mm H2O with normal constituents. fluorescein angiography delineated saccular aneurysms of the retinal arteriolar vasculature, and IRVAN syndrome was diagnosed. MR venography disclosed poor filling of both transverse venous sinuses. acetazolamide treatment of 14 months did not alter the fundus findings. IRVAN syndrome may present initially with optic nerve swelling and elevated intracranial pressure with subsequent development of the characteristic retinal vascular abnormalities.
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7/32. Percutaneous management of a hepatic artery aneurysm: bleeding after liver transplantation.

    In this article we present an unusual case of hepatic artery aneurysm bleeding due to a hepatic artery thrombosis after liver transplantation. The patient developed a recurrent hepatic artery thrombosis leading to severe graft failure in four consecutive liver transplantations. While being evaluated for a fifth transplant, stabilization of the clinical situation was attempted by interventional therapy. The first intervention was to place a stent into the hepatic artery to prevent further ischemic damage. This failed to improve graft function, but unfortunately led to the development of a pseudoaneurysm at the distal end with a subsequent rupture into the biliary tree. Bleeding was treated successfully by direct puncture and coil embolization of the aneurysm. In addition, the patient demonstrated a hemodynamically relevant portal vein stenosis on the CT scan. Stenting of the portal vein markedly improved graft function. After extensive investigations, a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria was found to be the underlying cause of the recurrent hepatic artery thrombosis. Here we suggest that hepatic artery aneurysm bleeding is a rare but potentially fatal complication that can be successfully treated by percutaneous coil embolization. Additionally, we propose that stenting of the portal vein can lead to a significant improvement of the graft perfusion even though the hepatic artery remained occluded.
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keywords = puncture
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8/32. Double microcatheter technique for endovascular coiling of wide-neck aneurysms using a new guiding device for the transcarotid approach: technical note.

    In the endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, positioning the guiding catheter is of great importance. In cases where vessel tortuosity prohibits positioning the guiding catheter in the carotid artery via the femoral approach, we use a direct carotid approach via common carotid artery puncture. For direct puncture of the common carotid artery we devised a 6-Fr sheath with double insertion points. This new device facilitates the use of double microcatheters and provides safe and effective vascular access.
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ranking = 2
keywords = puncture
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9/32. aneurysm of the distal facial artery from a penetrating oral prosthesis.

    We report a 94-year-old male who died of pneumonia. During the routine dissection of the head and neck for a gross anatomy course at our institution a mass was noted in the region of the right cheek. Macroscopic and microscopic observation of this mass revealed an aneurysm of the facial artery. A traumatic defect was noted at the apex of the aneurysmal wall related to an intraoral prosthetic clasp that had penetrated the buccinator muscle. Traumatic aneurysms of the face have been caused by blunt trauma to the jaw with or without fracture, surgical manipulation around the teeth and jaw, and following missile injury. Some have described compression of neighboring structures such as cranial nerves and other blood vessels with resultant compromise. We believe our case to be the first report of a facial artery aneurysm in a cadaver and we are unaware of other reports from the literature describing the production of a facial artery aneurysm from a puncture of an intraoral prosthesis through the medially placed buccinator muscle. Although seemingly rare, health care professionals should make efforts to ensure that oral prostheses do not develop sharp or irregular edges that could potentially perforate the lateral oral cavity with potential perforation of the overlying vasculature.
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keywords = puncture
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10/32. Preoperative measurement of the intrathrombotic pressure of a thrombosed popliteal artery aneurysm for decision of surgical indication.

    To evaluate the risk of rupture of a 77 mm thrombosed popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) in an 82-year-old woman, the aneurysm was percutaneously punctured and the intrathrombotic pressure (ITP) was measured preoperatively. The percentage of the mean ITP to the mean brachial artery pressure was 80%. The aneurysm was judged to have the risk of rupture, and replacement with a prosthetic graft was performed. The percentages of the mean ITP to the mean radial artery pressure and to the mean femoral artery pressure measured intraoperatively were 83% and 71%, respectively, which approximated to the percentage measured preoperatively. PAA may have the risk of rupture even though thrombosed, and preoperative measurement of the ITP might be useful to decide surgical indication.
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