Cases reported "Angiomatosis, Bacillary"

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1/78. Bacillary angiomatosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    A case of bacillary angiomatosis infection presenting as a skin nodule in a renal transplant recipient was found. The patient was taking cyclosporine, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil at the time of presentation. The bacillary angiomatosis responded to 6 months of therapy with oral erythromycin.
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2/78. Absence of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus dna in bacillary angiomatosis-peliosis lesions.

    bartonella henselae and B. quintana induce an unusual vascular proliferative tissue response known as bacillary angiomatosis (BA) and bacillary peliosis (BP) in some human hosts. The mechanisms of Bartonella-associated vascular proliferation remain unclear. Although host factors probably play a role, microbial coinfection has not been ruled out. Because of the vascular proliferative characteristics noted in both Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and BA and occasional colocalization of KS and BA, the possibility was explored that KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) might be associated with BA lesions. tissues with BA and positive and negative control tissues were tested for the presence of KSHV dna by a sensitive polymerase chain reaction assay. Only 1 of 10 BA tissues, a splenic biopsy, was positive in this assay; this tissue was from a patient with concomitant KS of the skin. Thus, KSHV is probably not involved in the vascular proliferative response seen in BA-BP.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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3/78. Bacillary angiomatosis by bartonella quintana in an hiv-infected patient.

    Bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis are opportunistic infections caused by bartonella henselae and bartonella quintana, which occur in patients with late-stage infection. We report a case of bacillary angiomatosis in an hiv-infected patient with skin, bone, and probably liver involvement, The identification of the agent (B quintana ) was done by polymerase chain reaction in the skin specimen. The patient had complete regression of all lesions after a 6-month regimen of oral erythromycin.
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4/78. Bacillary angiomatosis affecting the oral cavity. Report of two cases and review.

    Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is an infectious disease characterized by proliferative vascular lesions; it mainly affects hiv-positive patients. Multiple cutaneous nodular lesions together with fever, chills, malaise, anorexia, vomiting and headache are the most important clinical manifestations. It may also involve the heart, liver, spleen, bones, lung, muscles, lymph nodes, central nervous system and other organs. erythromycin, 500 mg four times a day, is the drug of choice. The importance of this lesion lies in its clinical and histological similarity with other diseases. Cutaneous and oral lesions of BA clinically resemble Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Histopathologically, BA may be confused with angiosarcoma, pyogenic granuloma and epithelioid hemangioma. We report two hiv-positive men with BA lesions in the oral mucosa. diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy and Warthin-Starry silver staining.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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5/78. Bacillary angiomatosis on a region of burned skin in a immunocompetent patient.

    Bacillary angiomatosis usually develops in immunodeficient patients with a history of contact with cats. We report a 21-year-old immunocompetent woman with facial angiomatous lesions following a second-degree burn and without a history of direct contact with cats. The diagnosis of bacillary angiomatosis was based on the demonstration of bacilli in histological sections stained by the Warthin-Starry method. The lesions resolved 2 months after treatment with oral erythromycin for 8 weeks. This case emphasizes that bacillary angiomatosis may be seen in immunocompetent individuals and may be transmitted in other ways than cat scratches, e.g. by arthropods.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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6/78. Molecular characterization of first human Bartonella strain isolated in italy.

    The aim of this study was to characterize a Bartonella strain (BA-1) isolated from a blood culture of an Italian, human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient with bacillary angiomatosis. We analyzed the isolate using molecular biology methods such as whole-cell fatty acid analysis, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, type-specific 16S rRNA PCRs, sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and arbitrarily primed PCR. The BA-1 isolate turned out to be a bartonella quintana strain, similar but not identical to B. quintana oklahoma, which was used as a control strain.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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7/78. pyomyositis associated with bacillary angiomatosis in a patient with hiv infection.

    Bacillary angiomatosis is an opportunistic infection occurring predominantly in patients with hiv infection. The manifestations of this vasculoproliferative disorder vary markedly. Virtually any organ site may be involved, singly or multiply. However cutaneous involvement can be a valuable clue to its diagnosis. We report a case of bacillary angiomatosis in an hiv-infected patient presenting as isolated pyomyositis of the right leg. The rarity of such a presentation and paucity of cutaneous lesions, as in our case, may render timely diagnosis elusive and difficult. Its recognition however, is important since bacillary angiomatosis, if untreated, is potentially fatal.
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keywords = angiomatosis
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8/78. A case report of bacillary angiomatosis in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    A man infected with human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) presented with a few-month history of an enlarging friable growth on the medial area of the left foot and a one-week history of bilateral lower extremity edema. Clinical and histologic examination led to a diagnosis of bacillary angiomatosis, and the patient responded to antibiotic therapy We provide an overview of bacillary angiomatosis, a rare disorder that affects immunocompromised patients with CD4 cell counts less than 100/microL.
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9/78. Bacillary angiomatosis of the anterior orbit, eyelid, and conjunctiva.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of bacillary angiomatosis of the lower eyelid, conjunctiva, and anterior orbit. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: A 76-year-old immunocompromised male patient developed a firm vascularized nodule in his left lower eyelid and anterior orbit. RESULTS: An excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathologic examination revealed an abnormal vascular proliferation and a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. A Warthin-Starry stain showed numerous bacilli. These findings are characteristic of bacillary angiomatosis. A serologic specimen was positive for antibodies to bartonella quintana. CONCLUSION: The lower lid and anterior orbit are rare locations for bacillary angiomatosis. Our case brings to attention the increasing importance of Bartonella infection as a causative agent of ophthalmic diseases.
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ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = angiomatosis
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10/78. Bacillary angiomatosis of the scalp in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient.

    Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is a recently recognized bacterial infectious disease that is mainly seen in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. BA has rarely been reported in immunocompetent individuals. A case of BA of the scalp in an immunocompetent patient, who was human immunodeficiency virus seronegative, is reported. The importance of differential diagnosis of this lesion is emphasized.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = angiomatosis
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