Cases reported "Angiomyoma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/6. Angiomyomatous hamartoma and associated stromal lesions in the right inguinal lymph node: a case report.

    Angiomyomatous hamartoma is a rare disease with a predisposition for the inguinal lymph nodes. A 51-year-old male patient visited a local hospital because of a right inguinal mass, measuring 3 x 4 cm in size, which was resected. The resected specimen showed irregularly distributed thick-walled vessels in the hilum, extending into the medulla and focally into the cortex of the node, eventually becoming more dispersed and associated with smooth muscle cells splaying into sclerotic stroma. These findings are compatible with an angiomyomatous hamartoma. Another tumor-like mass appeared shortly after the resection at the same location, but was not an angiomyomatous hamartoma, rather it was composed of edematous stromal tissue with proliferating smooth muscle cells. The stromal component included thick-walled blood vessels and lymphatics. Although it could not be determined whether these associated changes in the surrounding stroma are a cause or an effect of angiomyomatous hamartoma, they indicate the clinical difficulty in determining an appropriate area of resection and may provide clues to the pathogenesis of angiomyomatous hamartoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = stromal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/6. Primary composite angiogenic leiomyosarcoma-epithelioid angiosarcoma of the brain.

    The authors describe a primary sarcoma of the brain with immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of leiomyosarcoma as well as epithelioid hemangiosarcoma. The leiomyosarcomatous component consisted of spindle cells with well-developed external lamina, subsarcolemmal densities composed of microfilaments, pinocytic vesicles, and abundant intermediate filaments, and showed immunohistochemical reactions for smooth muscle actin. The epithelioid part of the tumor contained scattered cells reactive for alkaline phosphatase as well as CD31 and factor viii. Many epithelioid cells were lipidized and remarkably similar to "stromal cells" of a hemangioblastoma. Occasional weibel-palade bodies, indicating endothelial differentiation, were present in scattered neoplastic cells. There were also cells with features intermediate between endothelium, pericytes and smooth muscle cells, and undifferentiated mesenchymal cells. The brain at the periphery of sarcoma showed conglomerates of well-differentiated capillaries, telangiectasias and small dysplastic arteries, features that raise the possibility of origin of this tumor from a preexisting vascular developmental abnormality.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = stromal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/6. Renal cell carcinoma associated with prominent angioleiomyoma-like proliferation: Report of 5 cases and review of the literature.

    Five cases of renal cell carcinoma of clear cell type are presented, Fuhrmann's grade 2, associated with a peculiar stromal proliferation having angioleiomyoma-like features. This proliferation was particularly prominent at the interphase between the tumor edge and the surrounding normal tissues, in which it acquired the configuration of a tumor capsule. Four similar cases were taken from the literature. We postulate that this angioleiomyoma-like change is a tumor epiphenomenon and that it represents yet another manifestation of the well-documented capacity of renal cell carcinoma to induce vascular proliferation, probably through the secretion of angiogenic and other growth factors by the tumor cells.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = stromal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/6. Angiomyofibroblastoma of the vulva.

    Angiomyofibroblastoma is a rare, myxoid tumor of the vulva. To date only 12 cases have been reported in the world literature. patients are usually premenopausal and present with a vulval mass initially diagnosed as a Bartholin's cyst. The lesions are well circumscribed and range from 0.5 to 12 cm in size. Microscopically the tumors are characterized by high cellularity, numerous blood vessels, and plump stromal cells. Treatment is by surgical excision. There are currently no published reports of local recurrence or metastatic disease. Angiomyofibroblastoma should be differentiated from other neoplasms of the vulva where radical surgical treatment is indicated. A Case Report of angiomyofibroblastoma of the periclitoral region diagnosed in a postmenopausal woman is presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = stromal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/6. Comparison of angiomyofibroblastoma and aggressive angiomyxoma in both sexes: four cases composed of bimodal CD34 and factor xiiia positive dendritic cell subsets.

    Aggressive angiomyxoma (AA) is a distinctive, locally aggressive, fibromyxoid tumor of the pelvic and genital soft tissues. AA is of unknown histogenesis but the cytologically bland spindled tumor cells, which surround characteristic variegated blood vessels, show fibroblastic or myofibroblastic features. AA may be related to angiomyofibroblastoma (AMF), another cytologically bland fibromyxoid genital spindle cell tumor with variable myoid differentiation that does not, as a rule, recur. Recently, CD34 primitive fibroblasts and factor xiiia dendritic histiocytes have been found in varying combination in many fibrovascular, fibrohistiocytic, and myxoid soft tissue tumors. Both cells belong to the microvascular unit, a tissue responsible for stromal repair and remodeling and angiogenesis. To determine if these ubiquitous stromal cells participate in the histogenesis of AA and AMF, we examined two scrotal tumors, one AA with multiple recurrences and one AMF, for the presence of CD34 and FXIIIa dendritic cell subsets. For comparison, a vaginal AMF and a pararectal AA in a woman were included. We also studied actins and desmin to detect myofibroblastic differentiation, and, through double labeling studies, assessed hormone receptors and the cell cycle marker Ki 67 in the different cell subsets. The AA showed unusual cytologic atypia and was initially diagnosed as liposarcoma. It massively recurred four times over 12 years, the first time after seven years. The histologic appearance was fairly constant over the years. The scrotal AMF was a circumscribed 6 cm mass in a 37 year old man. In both cases, most tumor cells were wavy and fibrillar, spindled, stellate, or polygonal fibroblast-like CD34 dendritic cells. Depending on the area examined, a 20-50% subset of dendritic cells showed both nuclear and cytoplasmic staining for FXIIIa. Actin cells were rare but vessels had actin myopericytes, although a small focus of the initial male AA was desmin positive. The recurring AA expressed androgen receptors and had Ki 67 index of 10-20% in "hot spots" of the primary and up to 30% in recurrent tumors. The scrotal AMF widely expressed androgen and progesterone receptors with focal estrogen receptor positivity and the Ki 67 index was 10%. Both CD34 fibroblasts and FXIIIa histiocytes were present in the Ki 67 cycling fraction in both the male AA and AMF and both cell types expressed androgen receptors. The female pararectal AA had more focal CD34 reactivity, particularly in perivascular fibroblasts and these cells were admixed with small FXIIIa cells. The vaginal AMF was strongly desmin and variably to weakly CD34 with 20% FXIIIa dendritic cells and Ki 67 index of 2%. The vaginal AMF strongly expressed estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors. In conclusion our data suggest that at least some AA and AMF are myxoid fibrohistiocytic tumors composed of CD34 fibroblasts and FXIIIa dendritic histiocytes. In our tumors, neoplastic CD34 dendritic fibroblasts showed predominantly myxo-collagenous differentiation with prominent myofibroblastic differentiation in only one desmin vaginal AMF. Our results support the notion that AMF and AA are part of a morphologic and histogenetic continuum of myxofibrous and myoid tumors that may arise due to interactions between microvascular CD34 fibroblasts and FXIIIa histiocytes. CD34 and FXIIIa reactivity may be underappreciated in these tumors and is more important when considered histogenetically and biologically rather than in classifying individual neoplasms. Hormonal stimulation of proliferating pelvico-gential microvascular dendritic cells appears to play a role in the morphogenesis of both tumors.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = stromal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/6. Angiomyofibroblastoma of the vulva: a mitotically active variant?

    A case of angiomyofibroblastoma in a 48-year-old woman is reported. The tumor occurred as a left vulval mass and was treated by simple excision. It was located in the subcutaneous tissue of the left vulva and was well circumscribed, measuring 2.8 x 2.7 x 2.5 cm. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of hypocellular and cellular areas with well-developed small vessels. Spindle or polygonal cells were arranged with perivascular accentuation in an edematous or fibrocollagenous background. Some spindle-shaped or polygonal stromal cells were also arranged in epithelioid nests. In some areas, mitoses were frequent (maximum 3/10 high-power field). Immunohistochemically, the stromal cells were positive for vimentin and desmin, but negative for alpha-smooth muscle actin, S-100, neurofilament, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, CD31 and CD34. The average labeling index of Ki-67 in stromal cells was 3.1%. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that the stromal cells adhered with primitive junctions and contained intermediate filaments with no focal density in the cytoplasm. These findings were consistent with angiomyofibroblastoma, although previously reported cases did not show so many mitoses. Therefore, this case was suggested to be a mitotically active variant.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = stromal
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Angiomyoma'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.