Cases reported "Aniridia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/3. Traumatic wound dehiscence following cataract surgery: a thing of the past?

    PURPOSE: This study compares the frequencies of traumatic wound dehiscence following extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) and following phacoemulsification through a self-sealing corneoscleral tunnel. methods: A retrospective review was performed of the surgical record at a British eye hospital from September 1986 to August 1993 and January 1996 to December 1998. Cases requiring surgical repair of wound dehiscence following cataract extraction were identified. The frequencies of traumatic wound dehiscence following ECCE and phacoemulsification were compared using a two by two contingency table (chi-square test). RESULTS: Twenty-one cases of traumatic wound dehiscence were identified following 5,600 ECCEs (0.4%). In 4,200 phacoemulsification procedures only one case of traumatic wound dehiscence was identified (0.02%) (p = 0.0006, OR 15.8, chi2 = 11.69). CONCLUSION: phacoemulsification through a self-sealing corneoscleral tunnel is associated with significantly less risk of traumatic wound dehiscence than is extracapsular cataract extraction. The case of wound rupture following phacoemulsification is discussed with reference to a mechanism for the injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = phacoemulsification
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/3. Mystery of the vanishing iris.

    We present the first reported case of traumatic aniridia as an isolated injury after blunt trauma to an eye that had phacoemulsification through a corneal tunnel. This case provides insight into the properties of the self-sealing corneal tunnel and possible advantages that it may confer on the eye.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = phacoemulsification
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/3. Bilateral cataract surgery combined with implantation of a brown diaphragm intraocular lens after trabeculectomy for congenital aniridia.

    A 17-year-old male patient was referred for poorly controlled glaucoma on maximal medication, congenital aniridia, cataract, nystagmus, and hypoplasia of the macula. A bilateral filtering procedure was performed to control the glaucoma. Three months later, a slow motion phacoemulsification and implantation of a brown diaphragm intraocular lens (IOL) was attempted. Despite the presence of nystagmus and hypoplasia of the macula, the visual acuity improved from 20/300 to 20/100 in the right eye and from 20/400 to 20/150 in the left eye. Both aniridia IOLs were well centered, the anterior segment was quiet with normal intraocular pressure without medication, and all of the patient's glare symptoms disappeared. A single-piece iris diaphragm and optical lens offer a safe alternative for patients who previously had no viable options for iris reconstruction. The most serious postoperative problem, glaucoma, should be addressed before the cataract and lens implantation is performed to avoid a possible acceleration of the glaucoma progression by the large aniridia IOL.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = phacoemulsification
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Aniridia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.