Cases reported "Anisakiasis"

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1/3. Small bowel obstruction caused by anisakiasis of the small intestine: report of a case.

    Enteric anisakiasis is a relatively rare disease that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. We report a case of small bowel obstruction caused by enteric anisakiasis in a 59-year-old Japanese man who presented with abdominal pain a few hours after eating sliced, raw fish. Because of signs of an intestinal obstruction, a laparotomy was performed. Focal thickening and stenosis of the ileocecal region were seen about 100 cm from the end of the ileum and the lesion was excised. We found a moving anisakis thrusting its head into the mucosa of the excised small intestine. Histopathological examination revealed the infiltration of eosinophils in all layers of the intestinal wall and severe edema. Enteric anisakiasis is very rare, and its diagnosis is usually only made after laparotomy. Nevertheless, when signs of acute abdomen develop after the ingestion of raw fish, such as sushi or sashimi, the possibility of enteric anisakiasis should be borne in mind.
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2/3. anisakiasis of the colon presenting as bowel obstruction.

    anisakiasis is a disease caused by human infection by the anisakis larvae, a marine nematode found in raw or undercooked fish. With the increased popularity of eating sushi and raw fish (sashimi) in the united states infection with anisakis is expected to rise. We present the first reported case in the united states of intestinal anisakiasis presenting as a bowel obstruction. A 25-year-old healthy woman with no prior history of surgery presented to the emergency room with bowel obstruction by history and CT. CT also showed a mass in the right lower quadrant. She had eaten seviche, a raw fish appetizer, 2 days earlier and sashimi 3 weeks before admission. She was taken to the operating room for an exploratory laparotomy and was found to have an obstruction, the 2-cm mass in the mesentery, and diffuse mesenteric adenopathy. She had an ileocolectomy. pathology showed a degenerating fish worm, anisakiasis. She also had a serologic test for immunoglobulin e specific to anisakiasis and it was highly positive. Human infections, as mentioned before, are principally the result of ingestion of the anisakis larvae. These larvae are usually found in herring, mackerel, salmon, cod, halibut, rockfish, sardine, and squid. Most human infections have been reported from japan and The netherlands and involve the stomach. Invasion of the gastric or intestinal wall one to 5 days after eating raw fish may be characterized by the abrupt onset of abdominal pain, nausea and/or vomiting, diarrhea, or an ileus. For transient anisakiasis, supportive measures and reassurance are all that is needed. If the larvae have invaded the intestine or the stomach wall diagnosis and cure occur with endoscopic or surgical removal if evidence of obstruction or perforation is found. The incidence of anisakiasis in the united states is unknown but will likely continue to increase with the popularity of eating sashimi. This case is meant to demonstrate another possible cause for bowel obstruction in the patient who has just eaten raw or undercooked fish.
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3/3. Esophageal anisakiasis accompanied by reflux esophagitis.

    A case with esophageal anisakiasis accompanied by reflux esophagitis is described. A 38-year-old man visited our hospital with complaints of heartburn and disturbance of food passage about seven hours after eating raw cuttlefish. The first esophagogastroscopy revealed an anisakis larva invading the squamocolumnar junction. Near the anisakis larva, a whitish exudate was demonstrated in the distal esophagus just proximal to the squamocolumnar junction. An anisakis larva was easily extracted from the esophagus by forceps. Reflux esophagitis with whitish exudative mucosal lesions and an area of linear erythema more than 5mm long were noted endoscopically 8 weeks after treatment with lansoprazole and cisapride. After six months the third endoscopic examination clarified that there was neither exudate nor erythema in the distal esophagus. Judging from the clinical course that he complained of newly experienced heartburn about seven hours after eating raw cuttlefish, and that whitish exudative mucosal lesions and an area of linear erythema did not disappear at three months after extraction of the anisakis larva. It was concluded that an anisakis larva enters the stomach first and then returns to the esophagus by gastroesophageal reflux.
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