Cases reported "Ankle Injuries"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/212. Recognition and management of Tillaux fractures in adolescents.

    Tillaux fractures are relatively uncommon Salter Harris III fractures of the tibia. The importance of recognizing this fracture is that a residual deformity in the joint surface can lead to premature degenerative arthritis. For this reason, it is important that accurate imaging to assess the congruity of the joint, as well as adequate reduction, is obtained. These fractures can occur in adolescents in the 18-month period during which the distal tibial epiphysis is closing. These injuries occur either by lateral rotation of the foot or by medial rotation of the leg on the fixed foot. Closed reduction is sufficient in most cases; however, if a gap of > or = 2 mm of the articular surface remains, open reduction is usually required to adequately reduce the articular surface. Orthopedic injuries are one of the most common reasons children are brought to the emergency department (ED). Most of these injuries are easily managed by splinting, with outpatient orthopedic follow-up. However, certain fractures need closer evaluation and immediate consultation with an orthopedic surgeon. One relatively uncommon fracture that needs special attention is the Tillaux fracture. Paul Jules Tillaux first described this particular fracture in 1892. He performed experiments on cadavers and found that stress to the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament could lead to this type of avulsion fracture, which today is termed the Tillaux fracture. The distal tibial epiphysis is involved, and the mechanism usually is forced external rotation of the foot in a 12- to 14-year-old adolescent. This fracture only occurs during a certain time of adolescence, owing to the differential growth rate of the epiphysis, and only under certain circumstances. The fracture is of great importance because it involves a major weight-bearing articular surface. A residual deformity of the joint surface can lead to premature degenerative arthritis. We present a patient with a Tillaux fracture to elaborate on the mechanism of injury and to summarize the importance of its recognition and imaging and treatment options.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/212. Radiologic case study. Fractures of the foot masquerading as ankle injuries.

    An ankle radiographic series frequently is obtained when a patient presents with an acute ankle and foot injury. Although many fractures are confined to the ankle and are readily apparent, fractures of the foot can mimic ankle injuries. It is important to differentiate these fractures of the foot from the more common ankle sprain. Most ankle sprains are treated with ice, compression, and elevation, followed by range-of-motion exercises and progressive weight bearing as tolerated. When foot fractures are not identified, however, lack of appropriate treatment can result in late complications. Concentration on key areas as described here will reduce the incidence of missed fractures of the foot in these patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.29411764705882
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/212. Fibular nonunion and equinovarus deformity secondary to posterior tibial tendon incarceration in the syndesmosis: a case report after a bimalleolar fracture-dislocation.

    A 39-year-old woman sustained a grade II open bimalleolar fracture-dislocation of the left ankle. Six months after an ORIF of these fractures was performed, she presented with a nonunion of the distal fibula fracture and with a fixed hindfoot equinovarus and forefoot adduction deformity. At surgery for repair of the fibular nonunion, the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) was found to be entrapped in the posterior tibiotalar joint, with a portion of the tendon interposed between the tibia and the fibula in the area of the posterior syndesmosis. After extrication of the PTT, the hindfoot varus and forefoot adduction deformity were corrected. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the English literature of a missed PTT syndesmotic entrapment that resulted in a fibular nonunion and in a fixed foot deformity after an open bimalleolar ankle fracture dislocation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.47058823529412
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/212. Checkrein deformity--an unusual complication associated with a closed Salter-Harris Type II ankle fracture: a case report.

    This article presents a case of tethering of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon (checkrein deformity) and rupture of the posterior tibialis tendon after a closed Salter-Harris Type II ankle fracture. Delayed repair was affected by tenolysis of the FHL and flexor digitorum longus tendons and tenodesis of the posterior tibialis to the flexor digitorum longus tendon. This case represents the first such report of concomitant entrapment of the FHL tendon and rupture of the posterior tibialis tendon after a closed ankle fracture.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.35294117647059
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/212. The MR imaging features of the posterior intermalleolar ligament in patients with posterior impingement syndrome of the ankle.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the MR imaging features of the posterior intermalleolar ligament (IML) in patients with posterior impingement syndrome (PIS) of the ankle. DESIGN AND patients: Three patients (one male and two females, 13-25 years of age) are presented. Each patient presented clinically with symptoms of PIS of the ankle. Plain film examination was negative for a structural cause of the PIS in all patients. MR images were obtained with a 1.5 T scanner using an extremity coil. Clinical data and, in one patient, findings at ankle arthroscopy, were correlated with the results of MR imaging. RESULTS: Ankle MR images from the three patients with a clinical diagnosis of PIS are presented. Findings in all patients included: (1) absence of another structural cause of the PIS (i.e., an os trigonum, trigonal process, fracture, loose bodies, etc.), (2) identification of the IML as a structure discrete from the posterior talofibular and tibiofibular ligaments, and (3) prominence of the IML as indicated by (a) identification of the IML in three different imaging planes, and (b) a caliber of the IML comparable to that of the conventional posterior ankle ligaments visualized in the same imaging plane. Arthroscopic resection of a meniscoid IML resulted in resolution of the PIS in one of the patients presented. CONCLUSIONS: MR imaging is an effective means of investigating the IML as a potential cause of PIS. The identification of a prominent IML in the absence of another structural cause of PIS indicates that impingement of the IML is the most likely cause of PIS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.058823529411765
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/212. Acute complications in the operative treatment of isolated ankle fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Using a computer database, we conducted a retrospective review of all ankle fractures treated at our institution from March 1985 to October 1996. Twenty-one patients with diabetes mellitus and isolated ankle fractures that were treated operatively met all inclusion criteria. Seven had insulin-dependent diabetes, and 14 had non-insulin-dependent diabetes. A randomly selected control group of 46 patients without diabetes who also underwent operative treatment of ankle fractures during this same time period were matched for age, sex, and fracture severity. The complication rate was 43% with 13 complications in nine patients with diabetes. There were seven (15.5%) complications in the control group. Complications in the diabetic group included seven infections (five deep, two superficial) and three losses of fixation. The complications were more severe in our diabetic population, requiring seven additional procedures including two below-knee amputations; a third patient refused an amputation. No additional procedures were required in our control group. All complications in our control group resolved with treatment. The relative risk for postoperative complications in patients with diabetes who sustained ankle fractures that were treated operatively was 2.76 times greater than the control group's (95% confidence interval, 1.57-3.97).
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.52941176470588
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/212. Traumatic aneurysm of the perforating peroneal artery following ankle fracture.

    This report describes a case of traumatic aneurysm of the perforating peroneal artery following open reduction and internal fixation of an ankle fracture.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.29411764705882
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/212. Medial malleolar fracture associated with deltoid ligament rupture.

    The author reports a case of a fractured medial malleolus with a completely disrupted deltoid ligament following a pronation injury. To the author's knowledge, concurrent failure of both structures over the medial side of the ankle has not been previously documented in a pronatory injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.29411764705882
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/212. Combined talar body and tibial plafond fracture: a case report.

    We report a case of a crush fracture of the body of the talus associated with an anterior tibial plafond fracture. This injury is a rare variant of talar body fracture which merits special attention. The bony injury in this type of fracture is associated with multiple loose fragments involving both weightbearing surfaces of the ankle joint. After appropriate imaging to allow preoperative planning, we utilized a two-incision approach which was necessary to achieve adequate exposure and fixation. We used basic fracture management principles to deal with a previously undocumented fracture pattern.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.58823529411765
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/212. Traumatic rupture of the tibialis posterior tendon after ankle fracture: a case report.

    Degenerative tears of the posterior tibial tendon associated with chronic disease are well documented in the literature. Traumatic ruptures of this tendon, however, are much less common and consequently have received little attention. An association has been shown between pronation-external rotation ankle fractures and tears of the tendons that cross the medial aspect of the ankle, most commonly the posterior tibial tendon. In the present case report, we share our unique experience of an open-ankle fracture associated with the traumatic rupture of the posterior tibial tendon. This injury illustrates that soft-tissue injury must always be suspected concomitantly in the treatment of certain fractures on the basis of both mechanism of injury and fracture pattern.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.47058823529412
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Ankle Injuries'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.