Cases reported "Anus Neoplasms"

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11/93. Anal duct carcinoma: report of case and a survey of the experience of the American Osteopathic College of Proctology.

    Anal duct carcinoma, also known as anal gland carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of the anal canal, is an unusual anal cancer that accounts for approximately 0.1% of all gastrointestinal cancers. Delays in diagnosis most likely account for the poor prognosis associated with this cancer. Presenting symptoms often mimic those of more common benign anorectal pathologic processes. Multimodality treatment that includes surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy is often recommended. The authors describe a typical case of anal duct carcinoma and its management. They also discuss the findings of a survey of the combined experience of members of the American Osteopathic College of Proctology and review the literature.
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keywords = cancer
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12/93. Response of metastatic epidermoid anal cancer to single agent irinotecan: a case report.

    We report a case of a patient affected by epidermoid anal cancer who had hepatic progression after standard therapy with the Nigro regimen (fluorouracil and mitomycin C plus radiotherapy). This is an uncommon neoplasm against which only few chemotherapeutic agents have been tested. In our patient salvage treatment with low dose irinotecan resulted in a partial response.
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ranking = 2.1235405369261
keywords = neoplasm, cancer
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13/93. Giant condyloma acuminatum of the anorectum: trends in epidemiology and management: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PURPOSE: Giant condyloma acuminatum (Buschke-Loewenstein tumor) of the anorectum is a rare disease with a potentially fatal course. Controversy exists as to the epidemiology, pathologic nature, and management of the tumor. methods: We present a 42-year-old male with a 12-cm x 10-cm exophytic mass of the anal verge. Treatment included wide local excision and partial closure with rotation flaps. pathology revealed a giant condyloma acuminatum with foci of well-differentiated squamous-cell carcinoma. We identified 51 reported cases of giant condyloma acuminatum in the English literature, and to our knowledge this is the largest review to date. RESULTS: Giant condyloma acuminatum presents with a 2.7:1 male-to-female ratio. For patients younger than 50 years of age, this ratio is increased to 3.5:1. The mean age at presentation is 43.9 years, 42.9 in males and 46.6 in females (P = 0.44). There seems to be a recent trend toward a younger presentation. The most common presenting symptoms are perianal mass (47 percent), pain (32 percent), abscess or fistula (32 percent), and bleeding (18 percent). Giant condyloma acuminatum has been linked to human papilloma virus and has distinct histologic features. Foci of invasive carcinoma are noted in 50 percent of the reports, "carcinoma in situ" in 8 percent, and no invasion in 42 percent. Historically, treatment strategies have included topical chemotherapy, wide local excision, abdominopelvic resection, and the frequent addition of adjuvant and neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy and radiation therapy. recurrence is common. CONCLUSION: There seems to be a trend toward younger age at presentation and male predominance of giant condyloma acuminatum of the anorectum. Foci of invasive cancer within giant condyloma specimens are of uncertain significance and do not seem to correlate with recurrence or prognosis. Local invasion and local recurrence are the major source of morbidity in this disease. Complete excision is the preferred initial therapy when feasible. Wide local excision, fecal diversion, or abdominoperineal resection have been used. Chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and focused radiation therapy may be used in certain cases of recurrence or extensive pelvic disease, with unpredictable response. Controlled, prospective, multi-institutional studies are necessary to further define the nature and treatment of this rare disease.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = cancer
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14/93. Perianal rhabdomyosarcoma presenting as a perirectal abscess: A report of 11 cases.

    BACKGROUND PURPOSE: The organs and soft tissues of the pelvis are some of the most common primary sites for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) in children and adolescents. In most cases a mass is detectable on clinical examination, and the initial concern is focused on the possibility of a neoplasm. The current report concerns 11 patients, each presented with a painful perineal-perianal mass suggesting an abscess to the extent that each one of these patients was treated initially with antibiotics or incision and drainage for several weeks to months before the pathologic diagnosis of RMS was established. methods: The authors reviewed the clinical histories of all patients with perirectal/perianal RMS from their respective institutions to identify cases in which the initial clinical diagnosis or impression was that of a perirectal abscess. Pathologic material was reviewed in all cases. RESULTS: Eleven patients, 7 of whom were girls, ranged in age from 1 to 16 years at diagnosis (median age, 14 years). fever accompanied the clinical presentation in 2 patients. None of the patients had a past medical history of illness that may have predisposed them to a perirectal abscess, although one patient had a family history of inflammatory bowel disease. Duration of symptoms ranged from 1 month to 1 year (mean, 4.6 months). Each patient presented with a tender perianal/perineal nodule or mass. Inguinal adenopathy was present in 6 patients at diagnosis. White blood cell counts ranged from 6,600/mm(3) to 24,500/mm(3). LDH levels ranged from 414 to 3,432 U/L. The average time from presentation to pathologic diagnosis of RMS was 2.1 months. Nine of the 11 cases showed an alveolar pattern. All were high-stage disease. Of 7 patients with follow-up longer than 1 year, 2 (29%) are alive without disease. CONCLUSION: This report presents the need to consider the possibility of a malignant neoplasm, in this case RMS, in a child or adolescent with a putative perirectal abscess that fails to respond in the expected manner to incision and drainage and antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 0.9137477405188
keywords = neoplasm
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15/93. adenocarcinoma in the anal canal after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis using a double stapling technique: report of a case.

    A case of adenocarcinoma, developed in the anal canal after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis using a double stapling technique, is reported. In this case a T3N0 cecal cancer was found unexpectedly in the colectomy specimen. Two years later, this patient presented with an outlet obstruction of the pouch because of development of an adenocarcinoma of the anal canal. This was treated with an abdominoperineal excision of the pouch and anorectum.
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keywords = cancer
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16/93. adenocarcinoma below ileoanal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis: report of a case and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Restorative proctocolectomy with hand-sewn ileoanal anastomosis and mucosectomy is warranted in patients with dysplasia and/or cancer on ulcerative colitis to prevent subsequent neoplastic changes in the retained mucosa. However, complete excision of the colonic mucosa cannot be obtained reliably. We report a case of anal canal adenocarcinoma after handsewn anastomosis with mucosectomy. methods: A 47-year-old patient, previously submitted to ileorectal anastomosis for colonic cancer on ulcerative colitis, underwent completion proctectomy and handsewn ileoanal anastomosis with mucosectomy for recurrent anastomotic cancer. Two years later, we submitted the patient to pouch removal with permanent ileostomy for a mucinous adenocarcinoma of the anal canal (T2N2Mx) found at follow-up pouch endoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Only four cases of adenocarcinoma after handsewn anastomosis have been reported in the literature. This new case we report confirms that the risk of malignancy after ileoanal anastomosis with mucosectomy, although small, is real, despite the surgeon taking care with this particular step of the procedure. Careful surveillance is needed in patients with surgical treatment for long-term ulcerative colitis or dysplasia.
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17/93. Anal lesion resulting from implantation of viable tumour cells in a pre-existing anal fistula. A case report.

    Colorectal cancer exfoliates cancer cells into the lumen of the bowel, and possibly, raw bowel mucosa should provide a good medium for the exfoliated cancer cells. We report an extremely rare case of a sigmoid carcinoma metastasizing to a low fistula in ano. The patient was operated on for a fistula in ano. Biopsy demonstrated a moderate differentiated adenocarcinoma. Thereafter, sigmoidoscopy revealed an intraluminal mass at the sigmoid colon. The patient subsequently underwent abdominoperineal resection of the sigmoid colon and rectum. In conclusion, surgeons should be aware of the possibility of cancer spread incidence, distally beyond the initial site by exfoliated cancer cells into the lumen of the bowel.
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keywords = cancer
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18/93. Successful chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer despite previous radical radiotherapy for gynaecological malignancy.

    Repeat radical irradiation of the pelvis is generally not undertaken because of concerns regarding normal tissue damage; in particular to small bowel, bladder and bone. Two patients with carcinoma of the anal canal are presented who had previously been treated by radical pelvic radiotherapy for gynaecological malignancy. Both were re-treated with radical radiotherapy to the pelvis with concomitant chemotherapy. A complete remission of anal cancer was achieved in both patients with minimal acute and late toxicities.
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ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = cancer
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19/93. sentinel lymph node biopsy for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    BACKGROUND: The current Trans-Tasman radiation oncology Group (TROG) protocol for T1 and T2 anal cancers is combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy excluding the inguinal region from the field. Several centres worldwide irradiate both inguinal regions as there is a small incidence of involvement with early stage tumours. The presence of inguinal lymph node metastases is not accurately detected using clinical and most radiological assessment modalities. We have developed a method of sampling the sentinel node in the groin using established node mapping techniques. methods: A combination of radio-labelled antimony Sulphide and Patent Blue dye injected around the anal cancer enable identification of the sentinel node in the groin, using a gamma probe and direct visualization of the blue node. RESULTS: This technique has been used in four patients. A groin sentinel node was identified and removed in three of these, with pathological assessment excluding metastatic disease in the inguinal region. The fourth patient had a sentinel node mapped to a meso-rectal node. This was not sampled. CONCLUSIONS: The application of this effective technique will allow accurate staging of anal cancers to better plan future treatment regimes.
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keywords = cancer
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20/93. The sentinel node in anal carcinoma.

    AIMS AND BACKGROUND: Anal cancer is a rare condition. The inguinal lymph nodes are the most common site of metastasis in this neoplasm. The inguinal lymph node status is an important prognostic indicator and the presence of metastases is an independent prognostic factor for local failure and overall mortality. Depending on the primary tumor size and histological differentiation, metastasis to superficial inguinal lymph nodes occurs in 15-25% of cases. methods AND STUDY DESIGN: To evaluate the inguinal lymph node status we performed a search for the sentinel node in a female patient affected by squamous and carcinoma. RESULTS: Identification and examination of the sentinel node was positive and postoperative histology showed the presence of bilateral lymph node metastases. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that examination of the sentinel node in anal cancer could be an efficient way to establish the inguinal lymph node status, which would help the clinician to plan and perform adequate treatment.
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ranking = 1.1235405369261
keywords = neoplasm, cancer
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