Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/363. Simultaneous operation for minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Simultaneous minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair were conducted in a 66-year-old man uneventful, requiring no transfusion. Surgery required 9 hours and 2 minutes. The tracheal tube was extubated in the operating room. Postoperative bleeding was 215 ml. The postoperative course was very smooth, with the patient able to walk on postoperative day 1. Postoperative coronary arteriogram and aortogram showed favorable results and the patient was discharged on day 23 after surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/363. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patients with renal allografts.

    Aortic reconstruction is being reported in an increasing number of patients after renal transplantation as a result of improved renal graft survival and life expectancy. Aortic surgery in these patients places the pelvic allograft at risk for ischemic damage. We present two separate modalities that have been successfully used in protecting the renal transplant from prolonged warm ischemia during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in two cases. One technique involves an aortofemoral shunt using the perirenal aorta for proximal cannulation and the other technique utilizes an indwelling shunt through the prosthetic graft. Both patients had an uneventful recovery with no evidence of renal dysfunction and their renal function has been stable on long-term follow-up. These cases illustrate two useful alternatives in providing pulsatile perfusion to a transplanted kidney in the iliac fossa during AAA repair. They have been used successfully as simpler alternatives to temporary axillofemoral bypass or extracorporeal pump oxygenation in preventing postoperative renal dysfunction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/363. In situ repair of a secondary aortoappendiceal fistula with a rifampin-bonded Dacron graft.

    Secondary aortoenteric fistulas remain challenging diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Although the duodenum is most frequently involved, other intestinal segments are possible sites for fistulization. We report here a case of graft-appendiceal fistula revealed by recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding 11 years after abdominal aortic aneurysm replacement. The preoperative diagnosis was not achieved by endoscopy or imaging assessment. Despite recommended principles of total graft excision and extraanatomic bypass, appendectomy and in situ rifampin-bonded graft reconstruction were performed because of the advanced age and poor arterial runoff. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient remains well 17 months after operation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/363. Percutaneous fenestration of the aortic dissection membrane in malperfusion syndrome.

    We present two cases of malperfusion syndrome due to aortic dissection type-B. A supra-renal blind sac phenomenon resulted in renal failure and absent femoral pulses in both patients. Additionally, one patient suffered from spinal cord ischemia, the other from severe abdominal pain. By interventional techniques, catheter perforation of the blind sac was achieved. The resulting re-entries were enlarged with a balloon catheter. Distal perfusion without pressure gradients was restored by this technique in both patients and resulted in complete relief of symptoms. Percutaneous fenestration of the aortic dissection membrane may be an alternative to operative treatment in malperfusion syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/363. Abdominal pulsatile tumor after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    A 70 years old patient was successfully treated for infrarenal aortic aneurysm by an endovascular bifurcated prosthesis. Three months later, because of dysuria, he underwent urological examination revealing an abdominal pulsatile tumor. Thereafter, the patient was sent to our emergency ward with suspected symptomatical endoleak. Radiological screening by computer tomography and magnetic resonance angiography showed good post-operative results without endoleak. Patient was treated with antispasmodic medication and is doing well today. Because endovascular repair of aortic aneurysm, in contrast to an open approach, does not eliminate the aneurysm itself, post-operative abdominal palpation can be ambiguous. magnetic resonance angiography--without the need of nephrotoxic contrast medium--compares favourably to CT and provides excellent pictures with less artefacts for post-operative screening of endoleak. If reperfusion can be excluded, pulsation is due to the transmission of the blood-pressure wave to the thrombosed aneurysm.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.75
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/363. Fatal late multiple emboli after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Case report.

    BACKGROUND: The short term experience of endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) seems promising but long term randomised data are lacking. Consequently, cases treated by endovascular procedures need to be closely followed for potential risks and benefits. CASE REPORT: A 70 year-old mildly hypertensive male without previous or present arteriosclerotic, pulmonary, or urological manifestations was subjected to endovascular treatment after his mass-screening diagnosed abdominal aortic aneurysm had expanded to above 5 cm in diameter, the aneurysm having been found by CT-scanning and arteriography to be endovascularly treatable. A Vanguard bifurcated aortic stent graft was implanted under epidural/spinal anaesthesia and covered by cephalosporine and heparin (8000 IE) protection. Apart from treatment of a groin haematoma and stenosis of the left superficial femoral artery, the postoperative period presented no problems. A few days before the monthly follow-up visit, the patient developed uraemia, gangrene of one foot and dyspnoea. blood glucose and LDH was elevated. Deterioration led to death a month and a half after stent implantation. autopsy showed extraordinary large, extensive soft, brown vegetations in the lower part of the thoracic aorta above the properly infrarenally-placed stent. Microscopic examination revealed multiple microemboli in the liver, spleen, pancreas, intestines, testes, and especially the kidneys. DISCUSSION: Early death from microemboli after aortic stent implantation has been reported. However, the present case developed fatal multiple microemboli so late that they could not have originated from the excluded mural thrombus. The sudden death of an otherwise healthy man of extensive microemboli is difficult to explain. The stent application may have altered the proximal flow and wall movements disposing to microemboli in the case of vegetations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/363. Primary aorto-duodenal fistula secondary to infected abdominal aortic aneurysms: the role of local debridement and extra-anatomic bypass.

    Gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to spontaneous rupture of an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm into the duodenum is a rare and highly lethal clinical occurrence, representing roughly a third of all primary aortoduodenal fistulas. diagnosis is problematic due to the subtleties in the clinical presentation and course, and surgical treatment is usually delayed, representing a challenge even for the experienced vascular surgeon. The overall mortality is over 30% and the operative approaches are still controversial. Two cases of ruptured infrarenal aortic aneurysms complicated with aortoduodenal fistula were recently treated at our institution. Bacterial aortitis was documented by arterial wall cultures positive for klebsiella and salmonella species respectively. The clinical courses and outcomes of the two patients (one survivor ) treated with retroperitoneal debridement and extra-anatomic bypass and a review of the modern surgical treatment are herein described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/363. Abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Many cardiovascular complications have been described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), however, aortic involvement is very rare. We are reporting abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture in a 47-year old woman with SLE. The patient was admitted to our hospital with severe abdominal pain. Emergency computed tomography of the abdomen demonstrated ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The restoration of aortic flow with vascular prosthesis was performed in emergency. Postoperative course was uneventful.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/363. Aortocaval fistula in ruptured aneurysms.

    OBJECTIVES: to study incidence, clinical presentation and problems in management of aortocaval fistula in our series. DESIGN: retrospective study. MATERIALS: during a seven-year period, 112 patients operated on for abdominal aortic aneurysm, including four patients with aortocaval fistula. methods: standard repair of aortocaval fistula from inside the aneurysmal sac was the preferred operative technique. RESULTS: the incidence of aortocaval fistula was 3.6%. Three cases were found incidentally during emergency surgery for ruptured aneurysms; the fourth case was an isolated aortocaval fistula associated with inferior vena cava thrombosis, diagnosed preoperatively by angiography. In this case, inferior vena cava ligation instead of standard aortocaval repair was performed. CONCLUSIONS: Aortocaval fistulas, although rare, should be kept in mind, because clinical diagnosis is often difficult. Furthermore, unsuspected problems during repair may necessitate appropriate change in operative technique.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.75
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/363. Two-stage operation for multiple aneurysms of the thoracic aorta, abdominal aorta, and left common iliac artery in an octogenarian.

    Multiple aortic aneurysms are well described in the surgical literature. However, there are many problems related to surgical treatment of elderly patients with such aneurysms. This report presents the case, an octogenarian with multiple aortic aneurysms that were successfully treated by graft replacement. An 82-year-old man with a descending aortic aneurysm was referred to our institution for surgery. In addition to the previously diagnosed aneurysm, computed tomography and aortography showed an abdominal aortic aneurysm and a left common iliac aneurysm. Since the patient was an elderly man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a two-stage operation was performed. The abdominal aortic aneurysm and left common iliac aneurysm were resected first due to the risk of thromboembolism from the abdominal aortic aneurysm during surgery involving replacement of the descending aorta under femoro-femoral (F-F) bypass. Fifty-two days after the first operation, a second operation was performed to repair the descending aortic aneurysm. The postoperative course was uneventful. Angiography after the operation showed satisfactory replacement of the multiple aortic aneurysms. The patient was discharged 25 days after the second operation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.