Cases reported "Aortic Arch Syndromes"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/77. A case of aortitis syndrome and IgA nephropathy: possible role of human leukocyte antigens in both diseases.

    A 51-year-old woman, who had both aortitis syndrome (takayasu arteritis) and IgA nephropathy, presented with hypertension, fever, a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, high c-reactive protein and serum IgG levels, proteinuria, and renal dysfunction. Renal arteriography showed stenosis and poststenotic dilatation at the origin of the right renal artery, as well as tortuosity of the left renal artery branches and marked atrophy of the left kidney. Renal biopsy showed IgA nephropathy with deposits of IgA, C3, and fibrinogen in the glomeruli and arteriolosclerosis. The present patient had human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B 52, which is reported to be related to the aortitis syndrome, as well as HLA-DR 4, which is possibly related to IgA nephropathy, suggesting that HLA status may be involved in the pathogenesis of both diseases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = artery
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/77. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement for subclavian and brachiocephalic artery stenosis in aortitis syndrome.

    A 43-year-old man with progressive right common carotid, subclavian artery, and brachiocephalic artery stenoses due to aortitis syndrome is presented. The patient's right common carotid artery had been treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) four times previously, but it was finally occluded. The right subclavian artery was treated by PTA once, which resulted in restenosis. The stenosis extended to the brachiocephalic artery. For this patient, PTA followed by stent placement was performed for the right subclavian and brachiocephalic artery stenosis. Because arterial stenosis is progressive in cases of aortitis syndrome, simple PTA alone does not appear to be sufficient for treatment. We suggest that PTA followed by stent placement may be an alternative treatment for recurrent stenosis in aortitis syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = artery
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/77. Minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting using the gastroepiploic artery for reoperation after the Cabrol procedure.

    Obstruction of the right coronary ostial anastomosis is a rare late complication after composite graft replacement of the ascending aorta and the aortic valve with separate Dacron coronary grafts (Cabrol method). Occlusion at the right coronary ostial anastomosis in a 36-year-old woman with aortitis syndrome who underwent a composite graft with a Dacron coronary graft is described. She underwent a third successful operation for right coronary reconstruction by minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting technique using the right gastroepiploic artery. This approach is likely to be extremely useful in avoiding resternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass in patients requiring coronary reoperation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = artery
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/77. A subclavian artery aneurysm associated with aortitis syndrome.

    We performed surgery on a 61-year-old woman who had increasingly severe right shoulder pain and paresthesia in her right upper extremity as a result of a large right subclavian artery aneurysm. She had suffered from aortitis syndrome for 10 years for which she was treated with steroids and had multiple arterial lesions, including bilateral subclavian artery aneurysms, abdominal aortic aneurysm and obstruction of bilateral superficial femoral arteries. The right subclavian artery aneurysm measured 4 cm in diameter and rupture appeared imminent, prompting surgical therapy. Via the supraclavicular incision approach and additional partial sternotomy, the aneurysm was excluded and the brachiocephalic to right axillar arterial bypass was set up using an extended polytetrafluoroethylene graft. The patient recovered without complications and a subclavian artery aneurysm demonstrated by computed tomography was thrombosed 1 month after surgery. In conclusion, we recommend the exclusion technique to treat subclavian artery aneurysms in cases in which aneurysmectomy is likely to injure adjacent veins and nerves.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.5
keywords = artery
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/77. Atherosclerotic disruption of the aortic arch during coronary artery bypass operation.

    A 70-year-old-man presented with a symptomatic three vessel coronary artery disease and was scheduled for myocardial revascularization. During extracorporeal circulation an intrathoracal bleeding occurred and aortic rupture was suspected. An iatrogenic plaque rupture in the concavity of the aortic arch was found due to cannulation attempts. The aortic arch was grafted in the so-called elephant trunk technique. Thereafter bypass grafts were anastomosed to the stenosed coronary arteries. The patient was discharged from hospital after 2 weeks in good condition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = artery
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/77. Interrupted aortic arch type B in trisomy 21: repair with carotid artery interposition.

    A 21-year-old man with trisomy 21 was diagnosed with interrupted aortic arch type B and perimembranous ventricular septal defect in the newborn period. He underwent carotid artery interposition and pulmonary artery banding with subsequent debanding and closure of the ventricular septal defect. cardiac catheterization 20 years later demonstrated good "carotid arch" growth with no residual arch obstruction. Carotid artery interposition provided good curative repair for arch obstruction at late follow-up in this patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.5
keywords = artery
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/77. Extrathoracic repair of branch occlusions of the aortic arch.

    Thirty extrathoracic operations in twenty-six patients with occlusive disease involving the primary branches of the aortic arch were reviewed. Spanning a fourteen year experience, these operations included carotid-subclavian artery bypass, retrograde common carotid artery thrombectomy, carotid-carotid artery bypass, and femoral-axillary artery bypass. Dacron bypass grafts were used primarily for reconstruction, but saphenous vein bypass and endarterectomy were also employed. Indications for operation, the presence of concomitant cardiovascular disease, surgical technics, patient survival, and late patency of the reconstructions were reviewed. One patient died postoperatively (3.85 per cent). All Dacron grafts were patent on late follow-up examinations. Low mortality and excellent late functional results make extrathoracic repair the approach of choice in the management of occlusive disease of the branches of the aortic arch.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = artery
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/77. Systemic artery--pulmonary artery communication in Takayasu's arteritis.

    Four cases of Takayasu's arteritis in which systemic artery-pulmonary artery communication is demonstrated on thoracic aortography are presented. Pulmonary arterial involvement in Takayasu's arteritis seems to be more frequent than generally appreciated (12% in the present series). Demonstration of the communication in the absence of evidence of other causes of a shunt is strongly suggestive of pulmonary artery involvement. It is not necessary to perform pulmonary angiography to confirm the involvement unless clinically indicated. It is also stressed that the presence of pulmonary artery involvement is useful to differentiate Takayasy's arteritis from arteriosclerosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = artery
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/77. Surgical one-stage approach for coronary artery disease and occlusive disease of all aortic arch branches.

    A 52-year-old man, who presented with two-vessel coronary artery disease and severe arterial occlusive disease with occlusions and/or stenoses of all aortic arch branches, underwent simultaneously coronary artery bypass grafting and bilateral aortic-subclavian as well as left-sided aortic-carotidal bypass grafting.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = artery
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/77. common variable immunodeficiency syndrome with right aortic arch: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: common variable immunodeficiency syndrome predominantly affects adults. It is characterized by low production of all the major classes of immunoglobulins. We report a case of common variable immunodeficiency syndrome with right aortic arch. An association of right-sided arch and common variable immunodeficiency syndrome has not been previously reported. CASE PRESENTATION: A 41-year-old female patient presented with a history of recurrent pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media, diarrhoea, cystitis since childhood. Biochemical and immunocytochemical analysis revealed common variable immunodeficiency syndrome and radiological evaluation confirmed right aortic arch and aberrant left subclavian artery. CONCLUSION: common variable immunodeficiency syndrome syndrome is a clinical entity that should be kept in mind in patients with recurrent infections of different sites.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = artery
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Aortic Arch Syndromes'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.