Cases reported "Aortic Diseases"

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1/166. Aortic thrombosis associated with cocaine use: report of two cases.

    cocaine use has been associated with many vascular complications which may involve the carotid, coronary, and renal vascular beds. cocaine may also cause venous thrombosis. This report describes a new entity of cocaine-induced aortic thrombosis. On the basis of clinical findings and response to treatment, a therapeutic algorithm is presented.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis
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2/166. Aortoduodenal fistula: a late complication of intraluminal exclusion of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm.

    During recent years, considerable clinical experience has been gained with endoluminal stent-graft procedures. Several studies have shown promising results up to a period of 4.5 years. However, long-term follow-up studies are still limited. Late endoleaks caused by stent-graft migration, disconnection of single components in modular stent-grafts, and limb thrombosis have been observed as long-term complications. We report a case in which a migrated and kinked bifurcated stent-graft caused an aortoduodenal fistula 20 months after stent-graft insertion. To our knowledge, such a complication has not been reported before.
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ranking = 0.16654033122473
keywords = thrombosis
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3/166. Multiple aortocaval fistulas associated with a ruptured abdominal aneurysm in a patient with ehlers-danlos syndrome.

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of spontaneous abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture, with an incidence of 2-4%. A unique case of ruptured AAA complicated by multiple aortovenous fistulas involving the inferior vena cava and left internal iliac vein is presented, and is the first published report of a patient with ehlers-danlos syndrome undergoing surgical treatment for an ACF.
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ranking = 0.0006070696662576
keywords = vein
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4/166. Laparoscopic aortic injury leading to delayed aortoenteric fistula: an alternative technique for repair.

    Complications of laparoscopic procedures occur in up to 10% of cases. The most lethal complication relates to injury of major retroperitoneal vascular structures. A case of aortoenteric fistula referred to the vascular surgical service 1 month following emergency repair of laparoscopic aortic injury is presented. A technique utilizing a saphenous vein panel graft for distal aortic repair is described. review of reported cases demonstrates that major retroperitoneal vascular injury during laparoscopy is rare, with a reported incidence of 3 to 10/10,000 procedures, and a mortality of up to 20%. Simple suture repair is the usual form of treatment, but specialized techniques are occasionally required.
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ranking = 0.0006070696662576
keywords = vein
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5/166. Homozygous factor-V mutation as a genetic cause of perinatal thrombosis and cerebral palsy.

    A 5-year old girl with cerebral palsy (CP), preterm birth, postnatal aortic thrombus, and cerebellar venous infarction who is homozygous for the thrombophilic factor-V Leiden (fVL) mutation is reported. The role of hereditary thrombophilic disorders in the development of perinatal vascular lesions such as aortic thrombi, renal-vein thrombosis, venous-sinus thrombosis, and cerebral infarction is unknown. This case report brings into question a potential association between fVL, perinatal vascular lesions, perinatal stroke, and CP.
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ranking = 0.99984905701464
keywords = thrombosis, vein
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6/166. A case of aortoduodenal fistula occurring after surgery and radiation for pancreatic cancer.

    The patient was a 58-year-old woman given curative treatment (pancreatectomy (body and tail) intraoperative irradiation (25 Gy)) on the basis of a diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. Having a favorable postoperative course, she was discharged 24 days after surgery. A week after discharge, she was readmitted for a hemorrhagic gastric ulcer. She was later discharged again on conservative treatment, and followed up at the outpatient clinic, but nine months postoperatively, was readmitted complaining of loss of appetite and abdominal pain. Subsequent tests revealed stricture of the horizontal portion of the duodenum with distension oral to the stricture. Around the celiac artery, the paraaortic lymph nodes were swollen, and a diagnosis of stricture due to recurrent pancreatic carcinoma was made. On the day before bypass surgery was scheduled, the patient vomited blood, so the operation was postponed, conservative treatment such as blood transfusion was administered, and emergency angiography was performed simultaneously. The findings were an aortic pseudoaneurym 1 cm in diameter immediately below the origin of the superior mesenteric artery and between the left and right renal arteries, and a hemorrhage, caused by an aortoduodenal fistula, issuing from the horizontal portion of the duodenum. hemostasis via a laparotomy was judged difficult, and so an indwelling stent-graft in the aorta was tried to stanch the blood, but without success. Another stent then had to be inserted within the first, thus stopping the flow, but the blood supply to the celiac artery, the superior mesenteric arteries and the renal arteries was impaired, and the patient died about six hours later. Postmortem examination revealed aortoduodenal fistula without recurrence of the carcinoma. The duodenal wall around the fistulous tract showed delayed radiation changes with deep ulceration. The intraoperative radiation may have played an important part in the formation of the fistula.
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ranking = 0.00010348087316824
keywords = deep
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7/166. Abdominal aortic aneurysm with aorta-left renal vein fistula with left varicocele.

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm with spontaneous aorto-left renal vein fistula is a rare but well-described clinical entity usually with abdominal pain, hematuria, and a nonfunctioning left kidney. This report describes a 44-year-old man with left-sided groin pain and varicocele who was treated with conservative measures only. The diagnosis was eventually made when he returned with microscopic hematuria, elevated serum creatinine level, and nonfunction of the left kidney; computed tomography scan demonstrated a 6-cm abdominal aortic aneurysm, a retroaortic left renal vein, and an enlargement of the left kidney. This patient represents the youngest to be reported with aorto-left renal vein fistula and the second case with a left-sided varicocele.
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ranking = 0.0042494876638032
keywords = vein
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8/166. Acute aortic thrombosis after intra-aortic balloon pumping.

    Acute aortic occlusion is a rare but devastating complication of intra-aortic balloon pumping. Prompt diagnosis of aortic occlusion and immediate therapeutic decision making are keys for saving patients in such cases. We describe a 72-year-old man who underwent emergency surgical removal of a thrombus and aortoiliac bifurcated grafting for acute aortic occlusion after withdrawal of the intra-aortic balloon pumping catheter. The presence of a small unrecognized abdominal aortic aneurysm was considered to be the cause of thrombosis in this patient. Ultrasonographic screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm is recommended for patients who require intra-aortic balloon pumping support.
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ranking = 0.83270165612365
keywords = thrombosis
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9/166. Suprarenal aortic occlusion.

    Proximal propagation of an occlusive distal aortic thrombus to the suprarenal level is rare, probably resulting from diminished renal blood flow, and is invariably accompanied by renal failure. Three similar cases of total suprarenal aortic occlusion with renal failure are presented. In each, one kidney was significantly smaller than the other, probably caused by long-standing disease. The combination of bilaterally absent or markedly decreased femoral pulses with diminished renal function or a unilateral small kidney should therefore be considered dangerous. To prevent proximal propagation of thrombosis and death from renal failure, such patients should undergo arteriography and surgical repair promptly even though their clinical symptoms might be relatively mild and stable.
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ranking = 0.16654033122473
keywords = thrombosis
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10/166. Fatal hemorrhage complicating carcinoma of the esophagus. Report of four cases.

    Four cases of esophageal carcinoma complicated by fatal hemorrhage are reported. All four patients had recently completed radiation therapy. An aortoesophageal fistula was present in two cases; fibrinoid necrosis of the esophageal arteries was present in the other two. The esophageal tumor was localized in two cases and had disappeared in one case. In one patient it had metastasized widely. Ninety-nine other reports of esophageal cancer and fatal hemorrhage are reviewed from the literature. Aortoesophageal fistula was the cause of hemorrhage in 78 cases. Occlusion of the vasa vasorum by thrombosis, inflammation, neoplastic cells or radiation injury appears to be the cause of aortic necrosis and fistula formation. Prompt surgical approach, if possible, should be used to control hemorrhage, as the primary tumor may be localized to the esophagus only.
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ranking = 0.16654033122473
keywords = thrombosis
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