Cases reported "Aortic Rupture"

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1/13. Endovascular treatment of an aortic aneurysm ruptured into the inferior vena cava.

    PURPOSE: To report the endovascular repair of a rare abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture into the inferior vena cava. methods AND RESULTS: A 74-year-old man with a 6.0-cm saccular aortic aneurysm and a previously undiagnosed aortocaval fistula of more than 2 weeks' duration was treated successfully with a Vanguard bifurcated stent-graft. The aneurysm was excluded and no endoleak or communication between the aorta and inferior vena cava was seen on computed tomographic imaging at the 6-month evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: Aortic endografting in this life-threatening complication is an effective treatment option that avoids the significant blood loss encountered in conventional repair.
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2/13. Ruptured pseudoaneurysm of aortic root graft into the pulmonary artery as a cause of severe heart failure.

    A 52-year-old man presented with heart failure of 1 month duration. He had undergone aortic valve and root replacement 30 months before admission. A continuous murmur was heard in the second intercostal space at the parasternal border. aortography showed a pseudoaneurysm surrounding the aorta, whereas color Doppler study revealed flow from the central aorta to the pseudoaneurysm and flow from the pseudoaneurysm to the pulmonary artery trunk through a fistulous communication between them. Thus, fistulous communication with pulmonary artery causing heart failure is a complication of pseudoaneurysm after aortic and root replacement, which can be diagnosed clinically and echocardiographically.
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3/13. Abdominal aortic aneurysm with aorto-vena caval fistula and retroperitoneal rupture. Report of a case.

    One successfully treated case of ruptured aortic aneurysm with aorto-caval fistula is reported. At admission a large pulsating mass was present in the abdomen, and a prominent continuous bruit was heard by stethoscopy. Surgery revealed an aortic aneurysm with a retroperitoneal rupture and a large aorto-caval communication as well. The fistula was closed with continuous sutures, and after excision of the aneurysm the arterial continuity was re-established using a "Millinit" dacron graft. The postoperative course was uneventful.
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4/13. Homemade endovascular treatment of postoperative aortobronchial fistulas.

    Successful treatments of aortobronchial fistulas were achieved in two cases using a homemade endovascular stent graft. In one, a 75-year-old man was operated on for a distal arch aneurysm 11 years previously. In the other, a 73-year-old woman was operated on for a ruptured type B aortic dissection 2 months previously. In both cases, the chief complaint was repeated hemoptysis, and the communication between the aorta and the airway tract was at the distal anastomotic site in the descending aorta. To minimize risks associated with reoperation, endovascular stent grafting was selected electively. Postoperative courses were uneventful and there were no recurrences of hemoptysis.
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5/13. Aortico--left ventricular communication: report of a case.

    An 11-month-old male infant whose condition had been followed since birth was referred to the National taiwan University Hospital for management of a congenital heart disease. On admission, this infant was noted to have a systolic and diastolic precordial thrill and a grade 4/6 systolic and diastolic murmur. echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and cineangiogram revealed aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root. Surgical repair was performed to correct this congenital anomaly due to the progressive congestive heart failure. Intraoperatively, a breach between the aortic valve and the edge of the sinus of valsalva along the aortic annulus was found. This congenital defect was repaired with a Teflon patch successfully. Postoperatively, this patient convalesced steadily and was discharged. We report this unique case with aortico-left ventricular communication which we believe to be the ninth case in the English-language literature and the first in the Republic of china.
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6/13. Aortic dissection with a fistulous communication into the right atrium: a case report.

    A case of aortic dissection (type 1, De Bakey) with a rent into the right atrium (RA), diagnosed by echocardiography (echo) and confirmed by aortography, is reported. The patient presented with cardiac failure and a continuous murmur in the right second and third intercostal spaces. The patient has survived for two years with medial treatment.
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7/13. Right sinus of valsalva-right atrial fistula secondary to nonpenetrating chest trauma: a case report with description of noninvasive diagnostic features.

    A sinus of valsalva-right atrial fistula secondary to nonpenetrating chest trauma is described. Echocardiogrpahy demonstrated diastolic fluttering of the anterior tricuspid valve, suggesting a left-to-right shunt at the level of the right atrium. External jugular venous pulse tracings revealed large alpha waves and attenuation of the y descent. cardiac catheterization disclosed a fistulous communication between the right sinus of valsalva and right atrium. After surgical repair of the fistula, the ultrasonic recording and external pulse tracing reverted to normal. We believe this is the first description of such a shunt after blunt thoracic trauma.
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8/13. Traumatic subarachnoid-mediastinal fistula mimicking a ruptured aorta.

    A 35-year-old man, injured in an automobile accident was found to have a subarachnoid-mediastinal fistula that mimicked a ruptured aorta. Of 16 reported cases of traumatic subarachnoid-mediastinal fistula, this is only the third in which the fistulous communication was with the extrapleural space only. The possibility of subarachnoid-mediastinal fistula, although rare, should be entertained in injuries to the thoracocervical spine when neurologic symptoms are present.
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9/13. Case report. aortic aneurysm presenting as psoas enlargement.

    We present a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm in which erosion and bleeding into the psoas muscle caused enlargement of that structure but remained confined within it until needle biopsy produced communication with the extraperitoneal space. This confirms the observation that separate compartmentalization of retrofascial and extraperitoneal spaces normally maintains.
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10/13. Aorto-duodenal and subsequent aorto-colonic fistula following operation for ruptured aortic aneurysm.

    Direct communication between aorta and intestinal lumen, whether spontaneous (primary) or postoperative (secondary), is a rate and frequently lethal cause of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. This paper records what is believed to be a unique occurrence in the survival of a patient who following surgery for ruptured aortic aneurysm, not only developed an aorto-duodenal but subsequently an aorto-colonic fistula over a span of 5 years.
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