Cases reported "Aortic Valve Stenosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/112. Application of successive principles of repair to correct supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    The diffuse form of supravalvular aortic stenosis may extend in the takeoff of the coronary and arch arteries. Relief of the supravalvular stenosis requires a harmonious enlargement of the sinotubular junction to maintain aortic valve competence. The technique we used in a 9-year-old boy involved patch enlargement of all affected structures. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and retrograde cerebral perfusion was used during repair of the aortic arch and arch arteries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/112. Accessory mitral valve tissue causing severe subaortic stenosis with dextrocardia in a premature newborn.

    We report an unusual case of left-ventricular outflow obstruction caused by accessory mitral valve tissue associated with dextrocardia and ventricular septal defect in a seven-day-old, 2200 grams premature infant, who was referred with a heart murmur. The diagnosis was made by two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography which demonstrated the accessory tissue as well as a 100 mmHg peak systolic gradient between the left ventricle and the aorta. Ten days after the presentation the infant underwent emergency surgery after respiratory arrest and recurrent episodes of syncope. The accessory mitral valve tissue and its fibrous extension were excised and the ventricular septal defect was closed. We believe that surgical treatment of patients with accessory mitral valve tissue should be performed early because of the possibility of acute deterioration. Combined aortotomy and interatrial approach is very helpful in evaluating the anatomy and the mitral valve function as well as delineating the tissue to be excised.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 46.840036263253
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/112. Anterograde double-balloon valvoplasty for treatment of severe valvar aortic stenosis in a preterm baby weighing 1400 grams.

    We describe our treatment of a premature baby born weighing 1400 g with severe aortic stenosis, with a gradient of 80 mmHg across the valve. Efforts to advance a 6 mm angioplasty catheter into the stenotic aortic valve via the left ventricle failed. Anterograde angioplasty, instead, was performed using two 4 mm coronary angioplasty catheters. Six months subsequent to the intervention, the pressure gradient measured 25 mmHg, and there was no hemodynamically significant aortic insufficiency.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 46.840036263253
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/112. A novel use of Amplatzer duct occluder.

    This report describes the use of the Amplatzer patent ductus arteriosus occluder to close a left ventricle to descending aorta conduit. The patient was a 10-year-old male who was born with critical aortic stenosis and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. After initial valvotomy, he underwent left ventricular to descending aorta conduit placement. At the age of 10, he had a Konno procedure to enlarge the left ventricular outflow tract and 21-mm St. Jude aortic valve placement. Closure of the conduit was not addressed because it was inaccessable from median sternotomy. Postoperatively, echocardiogram revealed significant flow through the conduit with a wide pulse pressure. cardiac catheterization was performed with the premise to close the conduit with an Amplatzer patent ductus arteriosus occluder device.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 46.840036263253
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/112. Premature closure of the foramen ovale associated with aortic stenosis, left ventricular dilation with thrombus, and early mortality.

    Premature foramen ovale (FO) closure has been postulated as a cause of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We suggest that premature FO closure is also associated with left ventricular (LV) dilation and LV thrombus formation, and that FO closure in patients with aortic stenosis and LV dilation is a secondary event that occurs later in gestation than that seen with the hypoplastic left heart.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5617384800069
keywords = foramen
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/112. Retrograde cerebral perfusion with hypothermic circulatory arrest in a child.

    This report describes a 4-year-old boy who presented with infective endocarditis involving the ascending aorta and the arch vessels, with supravalvular aortic stenosis as the underlying pathology. Operation was indicated because of the embolic potential of the vegetations inside the aorta. Retrograde cerebral perfusion was utilized in conjunction with hypothermic circulatory arrest, to flush particulate materials from the arch vessels during operation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/112. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty in a 1,600-gram infant.

    We present a 1,600 g infant who underwent successful balloon aortic valvuloplasty from the right carotid artery approach. A simple technique to facilitate access to the left ventricle and expedite the procedure is described. Issues unique to performing balloon aortic valvuloplasty on such a small child are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 46.840036263253
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/112. Extended septoplasty for subaortic stenosis developed 19 years after double-outlet right ventricle repair.

    A 27-year-old woman developed subaortic stenosis 19 years after double-outlet right ventricle repair. Subaortic stenosis was caused by a narrow ring of fibromuscular ridge associated with a bulge of the underlying septal muscle. The aortic valve was bicuspid and stenotic. We conducted extended septoplasty, replacing the aortic valve. Postoperative cineangiogram showed an adequate left ventricular outflow pathway. Double-outlet right ventricle repair may thus be followed by subaortic stenosis as long as 19 years after initial surgery. This lesion was assumed due to acquired disease secondary to flow disturbances in the left ventricular outflow, so reconstructing an adequate outflow pathway is effective and appears to help avoid recurring stenosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 281.04021757952
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/112. association of pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum and aortic valve stenosis. prenatal diagnosis.

    A rare association of pulmonary atresia with an intact septum was diagnosed through echocardiography in a fetus 32 weeks of gestational age. The diagnosis was later confirmed by echocardiography of the newborn infant and further on autopsy. The aortic valve was bicuspid with a pressure gradient of 81 mmHg, and the right ventricle was hypoplastic, as were the pulmonary trunk and arteries, and the blood flow was totally dependent on the ductus arteriosus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 46.840036263253
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/112. stroke as the first manifestation of calcific aortic stenosis.

    Heart valve calcifications are rarely recognized as a potential source for cerebral embolism. Previous studies have identified mitral, but not aortic, valve calcifications to be risk factors for stroke. Based on these studies, heart surgery is unlikely to be indicated in patients who present with a stroke and an 'incidental' aortic valve calcification. We report a case of a 46-year-old man presenting with acute onset of left-sided weakness and numbness. A previous smoking history was the only cardiovascular risk factor found. head CT scan revealed a right middle cerebral artery territory infarct and an adjacent high-density lesion. CT angiography demonstrated the presence of calcific embolic material in the middle cerebral artery. A search for embolic sources revealed a calcific aortic stenosis (CAS). Initially placed on coumadin, the patient developed silent myocardial infarction 2 months later, presumed to be also embolic in origin from the CAS. After aortic valve replacement, the patient has been symptom-free during a 2-year follow-up. In conclusion, CT angiography may be the method of choice for detecting calcific cerebral emboli, and demonstration of a causal relationship between CAS and an embolic stroke by CT angiography may be an important adjunct in surgical decision-making.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Aortic Valve Stenosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.