Cases reported "Aphasia, Wernicke"

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1/5. A case of cortical deafness and anarthria.

    Generally, cortical deafness is not complicated by anarthria and cortical anarthria does not affect auditory perception. We report a case of simultaneous progressive cortical deafness and anarthria. At the age of 70 years, the patient, a woman, noticed hearing problems when using the telephone, which worsened rapidly over the next 2 years. She was then referred to our hospital for further examinations of her hearing problems. Auditory tests revealed threshold elevation in the low and middle frequencies on pure-tone audiometry, a maximum speech discrimination of 25% and normal otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem, middle- and long-latency responses. An articulation test revealed abnormal pronunciation. Because of these problems only written and not verbal communication was possible; her ability to read and write was unimpaired. She showed no other neurological problems. brain MRI demonstrated atrophic changes of the auditory cortex and Wernicke's language center and PET suggested low uptake of (18F) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose around the Sylvian fissures in both hemispheres. Neurologically, the patient was suspected of having progressive aphasia or frontotemporal dementia. Her cortical deafness and anarthria are believed to be early signs of this entity.
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ranking = 1
keywords = communication
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2/5. Treating attention in mild aphasia: evaluation of attention process training-II.

    This study examined whether attention processing training-II [Sohlberg, M. M., Johnson, L., Paule, L., Raskin, S. A., & Mateer, C. A. (2001). attention Process Training-II: A program to address attentional deficits for persons with mild cognitive dysfunction (2nd ed.). Wake Forest, NC: Lash & Associates.; APT-II], when applied in the context of a multiple baseline ABA design, would improve the attention abilities of RW, a patient with mild conduction aphasia and concomitant attention and working memory deficits. We also explored whether APT-II training would enhance RW's auditory comprehension, other cognitive abilities such as memory, and his and his spouse's perceptions of his daily attention and communication difficulties. With treatment, RW improved on trained attention tasks and made modest gains on standardized tests and probes that evaluated cognitive skills related to treatment activities. Nominal change in auditory comprehension and untrained attention and memory functions was observed, and neither RW nor his spouse reported noticeable improvements in his daily attention or communication abilities. These and previous findings indicate that structured attention retraining may enhance specific attention skills, but that positive changes in broader attention and untrained functions are less likely. learning OUTCOMES: As a result of reading this article, the participant will be able to: (1) summarize the previous literature regarding attention impairments and treatment approaches for patients with aphasia. (2) describe how attention Processing Training-II affected the attention, auditory comprehension, and other cognitive abilities of the patient in this study.
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ranking = 2
keywords = communication
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3/5. Body communication as compensation for speech in a Wernicke's aphasic--a longitudinal study.

    This case study describes a Wernicke's aphasic who had spontaneously developed a communication pattern involving a large portion of body communication to convey factual information. The study is longitudinal and compares the development of body communication and speech (here: the use of nouns, verbs, adjectives, and pronouns) during the 18-month period of rehabilitation. There is a clear development, showing an increased use of nouns, verbs, and adjectives and a decreased use of body communication to convey factual information. This is taken to show that compensatory body communication for factual information can be used by Wernicke's aphasics, something that is easily obscured by the finding often reported that most aphasics tend to show body communication patterns that are in accordance with their speech patterns. The role of pronouns and gestures for turnkeeping at an intermediate stage, when the patient is shifting from gestures to words for factual content, is also discussed.
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ranking = 10
keywords = communication
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4/5. Resumption of gainful employment in aphasics: preliminary findings.

    We report preliminary data on aphasic patients who, in spite of their language problems, have succeeded in finding a reasonably satisfactory occupational resettlement. patients who: (a) still had a moderate to sever aphasia, (b) had resumed a gainful employment requiring interpersonal communication, were recalled for a check-up and assessed with: (1) a comprehensive aphasia test: (2) a semistructured interview including detailed questioning about the type and reaction to aphasia, the type of work before the onset of aphasia, the type of current work with particular emphasis on the patients' compensatory mechanisms and emotional reactions. Results comprise 10 cases up to date. One case is described in detail. Findings indicate that the ability to resume a gainful occupation is often greater than could be expected on the sole basis of formal language examination. Findings are discussed from a neuropsychological, social and rehabilitation point of view.
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ranking = 1
keywords = communication
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5/5. Comparison of the performances of a fluent and a nonfluent aphasic on a pantomimic referential task.

    The pantomimic performances of a typical Broca's (nonfluent) and Wernicke's (fluent) aphasic were compared with each other and with four normal control subjects on a simple task of nonverbal referential communication. Both aphasic subjects demonstrated only about 50% accuracy in their pantomimic communication. Also, measures were obtained of the motoric fluency of the pantomimes of all subjects and comparisons were made between the fluent and nonfluent aphasics. These measures demonstrated distinct differences in the fluency patterns of the pantomimes of the two aphasic subjects similar to the differences in speech fluency which distinguish and characterize these two types of aphasia; that is, the fluent aphasic pantomimed fluently and like the control subjects and the nonfluent aphasic pantomimed nonfluently. The quantitative and qualitative similarities in the fluency patterns of the speech and the pantomimic behaviors of the aphasic subjects are discussed in terms of their implications for a definition of aphasia.
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ranking = 2
keywords = communication
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