Cases reported "Aphasia, Wernicke"

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1/3. face processing and name retrieval in an anomic aphasic: names are stored separately from semantic information about familiar people.

    Recent models of face recognition have proposed that the names of familiar people are accessed from a lexical memory store that is distinct from the semantic memory store that holds information about such things as a familiar person's occupation and personality. names are nevertheless retrieved via the semantic system. If such models are correct, then it should be possible for a patient to have full access to semantic information about familiar people while being unable to name many of them. We report this pattern in an anomic aphasic patient, EST, whose inability to recall the names of familiar people occurred in the context of a general word-finding problem. EST showed a preserved ability to access semantic information from familiar faces, voices, and spoken and written names and to process facial expressions, but he was unable to name many familiar faces. These findings are compatible with current models of face processing and challenge models which propose that names are stored alongside semantic information in a general-purpose long-term memory store.
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ranking = 1
keywords = voice
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2/3. Phonagnosia: a dissociation between familiar and unfamiliar voices.

    A dissociation between facial recognition and facial discrimination is well known, but investigations of "phonagnosia" (impairment of voice recognition and discrimination) have not been pursued. Using familiar and unfamiliar voices as stimuli, a marked difference between the ability to recognize familiar voice and the ability to discriminate between unfamiliar voices was identified in five patients, and a sixth showed a severe impairment in both tasks. Clinical and radiologic findings in these cases suggest that recognition of familiar voices is impaired by damage to inferior and lateral parietal regions of the right hemisphere, whereas impairment of voice discrimination abilities is associated with temporal lobe damage of either hemisphere. This dissociation of recognition and discrimination of the human voice suggests that these two functions are mediated by different brain structures and may contribute differentially clinical syndromes.
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ranking = 11
keywords = voice
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3/3. Selective acoustic phonetic impairment and lexical access in an aphasic patient.

    The relationship between acoustic-phonetic disturbances and lexical access was explored in an aphasic patient. M.L. had a restricted disturbance of phonemic discrimination that affected the discrimination of voicing contrasts in nonword stimuli. Despite this impairment, her discrimination of voicing contrasts in words and her comprehension of auditorily presented words containing voiced segments was excellent. Performance on lexical decision was impaired: M.L.'s rejection of nonwords was poor and her reaction times and error rates for word stimuli showed a trend toward being influenced by the lexical status (word or nonword) of the item that would be formed by a change in voicing. The results are consistent with a role for a phonemic code in auditory word recognition, coupled with lexical-to-acoustic/phonetic feedback, but are also compatible with the view that other access codes for the Phonological Input Lexicon are also available.
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ranking = 1
keywords = voice
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