Cases reported "Aphasia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/18. Right hemisphere semantic processing of visual words in an aphasic patient: an fMRI study.

    This study was designed to identify the neural network supporting the semantic processing of visual words in a patient with large-scale damage to left-hemisphere (LH) language structures. Patient GP, and a control subject, RT, performed semantic and orthographic tasks while brain-activation patterns were recorded using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In RT, the semantic-orthographic comparison activated LH perisylvian and extrasylvian temporal regions comparable to the network of areas activated by non-brain-damaged subjects in other neuroimaging studies of semantic discrimination. In GP, the same comparison activated homologous right-hemisphere regions, demonstrating the ability of the right hemisphere to subserve visual lexicosemantic processes. The results are discussed within the context of the normal right hemisphere's capacity for semantic processing of visual words. Examining results from functional neuroimaging studies on recovery in the context of innate hemispheric abilities may enable reconciliation of disparate claims about mechanisms supporting recovery from aphasia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/18. Short-term memory and verbal learning with auditory phonological coding defect: a neuropsychological case study.

    A patient is described with a rarely reported linguistic syndrome: he could repeat words but not nonwords. The patient produced semantic paraphasias in repetition and could read both words and nonwords flawlessly. His basic difficulties were localized in auditory phonological coding, identifying a clinical picture called "phonemic deafness." Short-term memory and verbal learning results suggested that a standard, selective short-term memory defect can be induced by auditory phonological coding deficits as well as by "pure" short-term memory capacity limitation and other phonological deficits. Findings also provided evidence that lexical-semantic code can allow normal verbal learning.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/18. speech-induced aphasic seizures in epilepsy caused by LGI1 mutation.

    PURPOSE: patients with autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (ADTLE) may have seizures precipitated by sound or speech. We have examined a patient with speech-induced seizures caused by an LGI1 mutation (C46R). methods: A clinical study and a video-EEG recording using interrogative speech as the activation procedure was performed in a 23-year-old man. RESULTS: He had experienced short episodes of sensory aphasia in situations in which he was suddenly verbally addressed. Voices became distorted, and he could not comprehend despite hearing words. The day after a late party, his girlfriend unexpectedly spoke to him. Her speech became unintelligible to him. He did not reply and had a generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizure. During an EEG, he was suddenly asked for the names of his siblings. He answered, but lost understanding of the further conversation and described how syllables floated together with an echoing character. With a versive movement to the right, another GTC occurred. In the EEG, rhythmic 6-Hz activity built up in the frontotemporal areas starting on the left side with bilateral and posterior spreading. Postictal slowing was symmetrical, and no aphasia was noted on awakening. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first video-EEG recorded seizure in LGI1-caused ADTLE. This peculiar seizure semiology and precipitating effect of speech may serve as a marker for identifying further individuals with this particular phenotype and genotype and may indicate that the LGI1 gene may have a physiologic function connected to the human capacity for speech and language.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/18. Is informed consent a "yes or no" response? Enhancing the shared decision-making process for persons with aphasia.

    Respect for patient autonomy and the need to have a comprehensive discussion of the risks and benefits of a medical intervention are two important issues involved in the process of obtaining informed consent. In dealing with individuals with aphasia, there may be particular challenges in balancing these two ethical imperatives. Although decision-making capacity may be preserved with aphasia, the patients' ability to fully participate in a dialogue regarding a proposed medical intervention is frequently impaired. We propose a process of enhancing informed consent for persons with aphasia while continuing to respect and enhance patient autonomy and the exercise of decision making for these patients. The use of a patient-selected "helper" during the informed consent process can improve the quality of the informed consent, while reserving final decision-making authority for the patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/18. Processing of visual syntax in a globally aphasic patient.

    A globally aphasic patient was trained on a computerized visual communication system. His ability to comprehend reversible locative prepositional phrases after training was studied and compared with the performance of Broca's aphasics on a similar task. This patient's ability to generalize symbols for actions was also investigated. The results demonstrate our patient's capacity to master a formal visual syntax in the absence of natural language and illustrate how this capacity may be used successfully in a visual communication system. A problem in generalizing symbols for actions is demonstrated, suggesting that certain heuristic and cueing capabilities in the approach may be helpful.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/18. Pure word deafness following bilateral lesions. A psychophysical analysis.

    A detailed clinical and psychophysical study of a woman who had developed pure word deafness associated with amusia after bilateral temporoparietal destructions is reported. The patient had a defect in temporal resolution encompassing auditory, visual and somatosensory modalities, but the clinical defect was limited to the auditory sphere. Auditory comprehension did not improve even if she was spoken to slowly, although marked improvement of temporal resolution was observed as the duration of a nonlinguistic sound was extended. Also, she exhibited a supramodal defect in the perception and reproduction of rhythm, which was rate-dependent. These and other findings led to the following conclusions: the auditory modality is much more dependent on temporal resolution than other sensory modalities; for a full understanding of the mechanism of pure word deafness, not only the defect of temporal resolution but also many other factors, for example, defective discrimination of loudness, pitch or tone duration have to be taken into consideration; and rhythm sense strongly depends on a supramodal capacity of temporal resolution.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/18. Self-monitoring behavior in a case of severe auditory agnosia with aphasia.

    This case report describes an unusual combination of speech and language deficits secondary to bilateral infarctions in a 62-year-old woman. The patient was administered an extensive series of speech, language, and audiologic tests and was found to exhibit a fluent aphasia in which reading and writing were extremely well preserved in comparison to auditory comprehension and oral expression, and a severe auditory agnosia. In spite of her auditory processing deficits, the patient exhibited unexpected self-monitoring ability and the capacity to form acoustic images on visual tasks. The manner in which she corrected and attempted to correct her phonemic errors, while ignoring semantic errors, suggests that different mechanisms may underlie the monitoring of these errors.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/18. Left-to-right transfer of language dominance: a case study.

    Partial recovery from aphasia was documented in an individual rendered hemiplegic and globally aphasic by embolic infarction in the distribution of the left middle cerebral artery. Computed tomography showed total destruction of the classical left hemisphere language areas, indicating that the right hemisphere was responsible for the improved linguistic function. This observation is consistent with right hemisphere language capacity demonstrated after left hemispherectomy or commissurotomy. Right hemisphere language function may underlie much of the recovery from aphasia after injury of the left hemisphere.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/18. Facilitating communication skills in adult apraxics: application of Blissymbols in a group setting.

    This report describes the use of Blissymbols over a period of 8 mo with four adult aphasic patients who also exhibit severe verbal apraxia. The areas investigated include the patients' ability to use Blissymbols as a facilitating technique for communication, the capacity for learning Blissymbols, attitudes toward the use of Blissymbols, and the ability to learn Blissymbols in a group setting. Our results indicate that candidates with good auditory comprehension, good visual-perceptual skills, and a high level of motivation are more successful in using Blissymbols as a facilitating technique. Blissymbols are found to encourage verbal language and writing skills, even though not stressed. The group therapy approach provides needed motivation and proves beneficial.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/18. Analysis of word comprehension in a case of pure word deafness.

    A case of pure word deafness due to a left temporal infarct is reported. The results of dichotic tests suggest that auditory verbal material may be processed in the right hemisphere. The inability to repeat nonsense words, the frequent semantic paraphasias in real-word repetition tasks, and the capacity to give a partial account of the meaning of a word that the patient cannot repeat show that despite the impairment of the phonological analysis, lexical semantic processing is possible. An attempt is made to demonstrate that the patient resorts to this semantic processing and that this reflects the linguistic competence of the right hemisphere.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Aphasia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.