Cases reported "Apnea"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/18. Benign occipital epilepsy mimicking a catastrophic intracranial event.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the rare, dramatic, presentation of benign occipital epilepsy. methods: We describe three children who presented to the pediatric emergency department from 1992 to 1996 with a clinical picture of catastrophic intracranial event. RESULTS: The main signs and symptoms were loss of consciousness in all patients, apnea in two, hemiclonus in two, general hypertonicity in two, eye deviation in two, fixed dilated pupils in one, and decorticate rigidity in two. All underwent emergency intubation, brain scan, and lumbar puncture, and all were treated with antibiotics, in addition to antiviral drugs in two. Two patients were also treated for suspected increased intracranial pressure. Two patients recovered within a few hours and one within 24 hours of admission without any residual neurologic deficit. Electroencephalograms, done within 48 hours after the event, revealed the classic pattern of occipital epilepsy in two patients and bilateral occipital slow wave in one. A 3- to 5-year clinical and electroencephalographic follow-up supported the diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Benign occipital epilepsy in children can mimic a catastrophic intracranial event. electroencephalography, performed early in the Pediatric intensive care Unit, may avoid or shorten unnecessary and aggressive treatments such as hyperventilation, diuretic agents, and prolonged antiviral therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/18. munchausen syndrome by proxy--a cause of preterm delivery.

    OBJECTIVE: To present the first case of munchausen syndrome by proxy involving self-induced preterm delivery. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 27-year-old Caucasian woman induced antepartum haemorrhage and rupture of membranes with a knitting needle at 26 weeks' gestation, leading to delivery of the infant. This "prenatal child abuse" led to a prolonged intensive care stay, extensive treatment and subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia. As the child recovered from the effects of extreme prematurity, he became a victim of fabricated illness and recurrent smothering episodes. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: After the diagnosis of munchausen syndrome by proxy was made, the child was removed from the mother and he has since enjoyed good health. CONCLUSION: Self-induction of antepartum haemorrhage can lead to preterm delivery and may be recognisable by certain clinical parameters. The victim of self-induced preterm delivery, if survival ensues, may be subject to further abuse.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 16843.395776358
keywords = proxy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/18. Aggravation of human and experimental myasthenia gravis by contrast media.

    After observing a 72-year-old myasthenic patient develop an acute myasthenic exacerbation following the administration of routine diagnostic IV contrast material, an observation rarely described in the literature, we used the experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis model in rabbits injected with a contrast agent to simulate the situation. There was significant worsening of the decremental response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation from 40 /- 29% to 55 /- 27% following the IV administration of contrast agent at doses similar to those used in humans. IV calcium partially reversed this aggravation. Caution is merited when myasthenic patients are administered contrast media.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/18. Serial munchausen syndrome by proxy.

    Five cases of munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP) are presented in which more than one child in the family was victimized. There was a high incidence of maternal psychiatric histories, marital difficulties, and Munchhausen syndrome in the mothers themselves. Seventy-one percent of the children in the families were known to be victims of MSBP; four of these children (31%) died. Multiple-child MSBP may reflect more significant maternal psychopathology than found in other cases of MSBP, or it may indicate the deteriorating consequences to the mother and other children in the family if this syndrome is not identified with the first child and effective interventions made.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 14036.163146965
keywords = proxy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/18. Sensitivity to both vecuronium and neostigmine in a sero-negative myasthenic patient.

    We describe a sero-negative ocular myasthenic patient who showed exaggerated responses to both vecuronium and neostigmine. These hypersensitive responses were not anticipated because preoperative clinical and laboratory evaluations suggested a negligible impairment of somatic muscles by myasthenic processes. This case report re-emphasizes that, if neuromuscular blocking agents and their antagonists are administered to myasthenic patients, regardless of the degree of impairment, the dose should be titrated carefully with the aid of a neuromuscular transmission monitor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/18. Parental administration of chemical agents: a cause of apparent life-threatening events.

    Nine infants with apparent life-threatening events that occurred as a result of poisoning by a caretaker are described. These episodes were characterized by apnea plus some combination of color change, choking or gagging, and abnormal muscle tone. Five of the infants responded to vigorous stimulation, and four required cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Most poisonings (seven infants) were detected by a urine drug screen. Medications detected included acetaminophen, amphetamine, benzodiazepines (two infants), cocaine, codeine, meperidine (two infants), methadone, phenobarbital, and phenothiazines (three infants). Four infants received two or more drugs. Most perpetrators of the poisonings were mothers (seven) and five of the parents admitted administering the various agents. Reasons for the poisonings included an apparent attempt to harm an infant, the need to sedate a fussy infant, or a gross misunderstanding of the potential risk of various agents to infants. Because no history of drug administration was elicited at the time of hospital admission, six infants might have been discharged with a diagnosis of apnea of infancy had not an attempt been made to investigate the possibility of poisoning. These cases suggest that poisoning by a caretaker should be added to the differential diagnosis of any infant brought to medical attention because of an apparent life-threatening event and that urine drug screening should be considered in the evaluation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/18. Myasthenic crisis after intravenous administration of iodinated contrast agent.

    Two women with myasthenia gravis became apneic immediately after IV injection of iodinated contrast material for CT. Aggravation of myasthenia continued for days after this initial reaction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/18. Neonatal apnea associated with maternal clonazepam therapy: a case report.

    A 2750-g female infant was born at 36 weeks' gestation to a 40-year-old woman treated with clonazepam throughout her pregnancy. The infant developed apnea, cyanosis, and hypotonia within a few hours of birth. The mother's serum clonazepam level at delivery was 32 ng/mL; the cord blood level was 19 ng/mL. The infant had no congenital malformations, evidence of infection, or seizures. Clinical episodes ceased by ten days of age. The woman elected to breastfeed; breast milk clonazepam levels were between 11 and 13 ng/mL. She was discharged with a cardiorespiratory monitor. The authors suggest that infants of mothers receiving this agent during pregnancy or while nursing have serum levels measured. Additionally, these infants should be monitored for central nervous system depression or apnea.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/18. Intoxication with ajmaline in an infant.

    We present a case of overdosage of ajmaline in an infant. The appearance of atactic gait and clonic tonic seizures were followed by loss of consciousness, apnea, supraventricular tachycardia, left bundle-branch block, and a prolonged Q-T interval. cardiopulmonary resuscitation, gastric lavage, and forced diuresis were followed by complete recovery. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring is mandatory in these cases, and the use of a cardiac pacemaker, respirator, and therapy with antiarrhythmic agents should be considered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/18. The anesthetic agent as an extra-integumentary foreign body in the respiratory tract. A new theory of general anesthesia.

    Two cases are cited of patients who sometimes exhibited a condition of temporary unconsciousness which proceeded to spontaneous recovery without harmful sequelae. This type of cerebral arrest is frequently called general anesthesia:however, these patients had not received any drugs. What they did have was an irritant in the respiratory passages as shown by coughing. Three cases of general anesthesia are described wherein the duration of the phenomenon appeared to be partly due to the presence of an extra-integumentary foreign body, confined to the respiratory passages. In this trio there was evidence that the drugs did not affect the patients in any unusual way, whatever their effects on whichever side of the alveolar walls. Many anesthetic agents act like unabsorbable foreign bodies, in that they enter and leave the body unchanged, despite the fact that they do pierce the integument. Of course, almost everything, except inspirable and expirable air, but including anesthetic agents, is a foreign body in the respiratory tract. On the basis of these considerations, I suggest that one way, in which general anesthetic agents work, is an extra-integumentary foreign bodies, causing reflex coma by irritating or stimulating the trigger points in the walls of the respiratory tract, thereby arresting the cerebrum.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = agent
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Apnea'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.