Cases reported "Appendicitis"

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1/140. appendicitis simulating torsion of the spermatic cord: a case report.

    A case of acute non-perforated appendicitis presenting as acute scrotal swelling and erythema is reported. A communicating hydrocele containing serous cloudy fluid was encountered on examination, suggesting the intra-abdominal pathology.
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ranking = 1
keywords = intra-abdominal
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2/140. Retained fecalith after laparoscopic appendectomy.

    An intraabdominal abscess developed from a retained fecalith following laparoscopic appendectomy. We discuss the prevention and management of retained fecaliths in light of the numerous reports of retained gallstones.
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ranking = 5.9151983790261
keywords = abscess
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3/140. Psoas abscesses complicating colonic disease: imaging and therapy.

    Most surgeons think of psoas abscesses as a very rare condition related to tuberculosis of the spine, but in contemporary surgical practice they are more usually a complication of gastrointestinal disease. A case note study was undertaken on all patients treated for psoas abscess at two large hospitals in the mid-Trent region over a 2-year period. All seven patients presented with pyrexia, psoas spasm, a tender mass and leucocytosis. The diagnosis was made on abdominal radiographs in one patient, CT scan in three, MRI in two, and ultrasound in one. Aetiological factors included Crohn's disease in three, appendicitis in two, and sigmoid diverticulitis and metastatic colorectal carcinoma in one each. Six patients underwent transabdominal resection of the diseased bowel, retroperitoneal debridement and external drainage of the abscess cavity. Percutaneous drainage was performed in one. Two patients had more than one surgical exploration for complications. There were no deaths and the hospital stay ranged from 8-152 days. psoas abscess can be a difficult and protracted problem. Bowel resection, thorough debridement, external drainage and concomitant antibiotics are essential for psoas abscesses complicating gastrointestinal disease. Defunctioning stomas may be necessary. However, in some cases a multidisciplinary approach may be required, as psoas abscesses can involve bone and joints.
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ranking = 59.151983790261
keywords = abscess
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4/140. Epigastric appendiceal abscess with spontaneous drainage into the stomach.

    The appendiceal abscess is a common complication of acute appendicitis and usually is located in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. An epigastric appendiceal abscess has never been reported at an unusual location. We experienced an unusual case of a 49-year-old man with an epigastric appendiceal abscess. Initially, this abscess was suspected to be a pancreatic abscess. Abdominal CT scan and barium enema demonstrated a hyperrotated cecum with an appendiceal abscess in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. An gastroscopy revealed a small fistula-like lesion with purulent coating at the bulging posterior gastric wall. The abscess resolved spontaneously. We believe that the abscess drained into the stomach through a small fistula between the stomach and abscess cavity. There was no recurrence for over 6 months.
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ranking = 76.897578927339
keywords = abscess
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5/140. appendix abscess: a surgical giant presenting as a geriatric giant.

    CASE REPORT: A women aged 102 years presented with falls and was found to have an atypical presentation of appendicitis. CONCLUSION: This illustrates the non-specific presentation of disease in old age and the importance of a careful medical assessment of people who have fallen.
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ranking = 23.660793516104
keywords = abscess
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6/140. Mechanic intestinal obstruction--a possible presentation of perforated appendicitis.

    A 61-year-old man presented with diffuse abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting and fever. On the initial diagnosis of gastroenteritis the patient received the antibiotic ofloxacine for one week. On admission plain abdominal radiograph suggested a mechanic intestinal obstruction. In computed tomography a conglomerate tumor in the ileocecal region was seen and the patient underwent laparotomy. The conglomerate tumor was mobilized and an abscess opened, which was caused by a perforated appendicitis. After the operation the patient improved immediately and had an uneventful postoperative course. He was released and did not suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms the following 16 months of follow-up. The present case shall set forth that perforated appendicitis can clinically present as intestinal obstruction. Although a rare complication, perforated appendicitis should therefore even be considered in cases of mechanic intestinal obstruction of unknown cause.
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ranking = 5.9151983790261
keywords = abscess
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7/140. Splenic abscess after appendicitis.

    We report an appendicitis complicated by a splenic abscess in a patient with polycystic kidneys and multiple cystic lesions in the liver. Clinical decision making for operative intervention was made difficult by the extensive intra-abdominal abnormalities seen on computer tomography. Finally curation was achieved by splenectomy and appendectomy.
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ranking = 30.57599189513
keywords = abscess, intra-abdominal
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8/140. Acute appendicitis presenting with a testicular mass: ultrasound appearances.

    Acute appendicitis presenting with scrotal symptoms is a rare event, occurring when a patent processus vaginalis persists. We present a case where ultrasound demonstrated an inflamed appendix and a scrotal abscess, allowing the correct surgical management in a difficult clinical situation. In a child presenting with scrotal signs and vague lower abdominal symptoms, an ultrasound assessment of the right iliac fossa should always be performed.
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ranking = 5.9151983790261
keywords = abscess
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9/140. Is there a role for interval appendectomy in the management of acute appendicitis?

    Interval appendectomy (IA) remains a controversial subject in surgery. To determine its effectiveness we reviewed our results with this approach. From January 1990 through December 1998 a total of 73 patients underwent appendectomy, five (7%) of which were interval in nature. These IA patients had a palpable abdominal mass or delayed presentation that led to CT scan. The decision to delay surgery was determined by two factors: 1) a CT scan that showed advanced inflammatory changes (phlegmon or abscess) associated with acute appendicitis and 2) a rapid response to conservative management. All patients received antibiotics-first intravenous and then oral. Repeat CT scans were performed before surgery and showed a virtual resolution of the inflammatory process. appendectomy was delayed from 35 to 66 days from the time of diagnosis (average 51 days). There were no preoperative complications, the operations were uneventful, and there were no significant postoperative sequelae. IA appears to convert an unfavorable surgical situation potentially fraught with complications (fistula, abscess, wound infection) to one that is essentially elective in nature. It should be considered for the patient who is found to have an extensive periappendiceal inflammatory process, is clinically stable, and responds favorably to initial nonoperative management.
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ranking = 11.830396758052
keywords = abscess
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10/140. Left lower quadrant pain of unusual cause.

    The differential diagnosis of left lower quadrant abdominal pain in an adult man includes, among others, sigmoid diverticulitis; leaking abdominal aortic aneurysm; renal colic; epididymitis; incarcerated hernia; bowel obstruction; regional enteritis; psoas abscess; and in this rare instance, situs inversus with acute appendicitis. We report a case of situs inversus totalis with left-sided appendicitis and a brief review of the literature. There were several subtle indicators of total situs inversus present that were missed by the physicians and surgeons who initially evaluated the patient prior to surgery. Computed tomography scan with contrast, however, revealed the diagnosis immediately, and treatment was successfully initiated.
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ranking = 5.9151983790261
keywords = abscess
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