Cases reported "Arachnoid Cysts"

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1/92. Paroxysmal kinesigenic choreoathetosis associated with frontotemporal arachnoid cyst--case report.

    A 17-year-old male presented with paroxysmal kinesigenic choreoathetosis (PKC) associated with frontotemporal arachnoid cyst. xenon-133 single photon emission computed tomography detected a slight but equivocal decrease in regional cerebral blood flow in the vicinity of basal ganglia associated with the PKC episodes. PKC continued after surgical removal of the cyst but was well controlled by oral administration of carbamazepine. Whether the pathogenesis of symptomatic PKC was associated with the cortical lesion could not be determined in the present case.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
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2/92. Development of a middle fossa arachnoid cyst. A theory on its pathogenesis.

    The progression of congenital arachnoid cysts has seldom been documented. We report the case of a child who was diagnosed with arrested hydrocephalus at the age of 13 months. neuroimaging studies performed when the girl was 22 months old showed the appearance of an arachnoid cyst in the right middle fossa, while the previously enlarged ventricles seemed to have decreased in size. To the best of our knowledge, the paradoxical expansion of an arachnoid pouch following a reduction in the size of the ventricular system has not previously been documented. We advance the hypothesis that the development of some cases of arachnoid cyst might be pathogenically related to impaired CSF dynamics associated with pre-existing hydrocephalus. We also briefly review the pertinent literature on the formation and evolution of congenital cerebral arachnoid cysts.
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ranking = 12.96900924887
keywords = ventricle, cerebral
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3/92. The Chiari II malformation: lesions discovered within the fourth ventricle.

    Structural lesions associated with the Chiari II malformation have been identified within the fourth ventricle in 8 patients. During the 42-month period encompassing the operations of the 7 patients treated surgically, only 9 other patients were explored without the discovery of some associated structural lesion. The patients ranged in age from 2 to 26 years. The following lesions were identified: glial or arachnoidal cysts (3 patients), glial or choroidal nodules (3 patients) and subependymoma (2 patients). These lesions were all situated in the roof of the fourth ventricle adjacent to or interspersed with the choroid plexus. Only the cystic lesions were identified by preoperative imaging. In only 1 case did the associated lesion, a 2-cm cyst, seem to contribute to the patient's clinical presentation. Structural lesions of the fourth ventricle associated with the Chiari II malformation are common in patients who are submitted to decompression. These lesions may be dysplasias of developmental origin, or they may be reactive lesions related to chronic compression and ischemia. They do not necessarily required biopsy or excision.
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ranking = 83.783064742087
keywords = ventricle
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4/92. Endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy of a quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst. Case report.

    The authors present the case of an elderly patient with a quadrigeminal arachnoid cyst who was successfully treated with endoscopic fenestration through the posterior wall of the third ventricle via the anterior horn of the lateral ventricle. This 71-year-old man suffered from progressive gait instability and disorientation. Radiological examination revealed hydrocephalus caused by a quadrigeminal arachnoid cyst. The patient underwent endoscopic fenestration of the quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst and third ventriculostomy via one burr hole placed at the coronal suture. This method is less invasive and is effective for quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst and accompanying hydrocephalus.
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ranking = 23.938018497739
keywords = ventricle
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5/92. Endoscopic-guided proximal catheter placement in treatment of posterior fossa cysts.

    PURPOSE: Treatment of posterior fossa cysts by cystoperitoneal shunting may be complicated by a malpositioned proximal catheter located within the brainstem or cerebellum causing acute shunt malfunction or neurological deficits. We propose that proximal catheter placement from a posterior fossa approach aided by a malleable endoscope may prevent malposition and its complications. methods: We present 4 procedures we performed on 3 patients with posterior fossa cysts using a posterior fossa approach. In each case, the proximal catheter was molded along with a malleable endoscope to place the catheter parallel to the long axis of the fourth ventricle. Direct visualization during catheter placement insured an intracavitary position. RESULTS: Ultimately, the procedure was successful in all 3 patients as judged by intracavitary catheter position and decrease in cyst size on postoperative imaging. In 1 patient, revision using the same technique was required based upon suboptimal catheter position within one of numerous cystic compartments within the posterior fossa. There were no complications related to direct or indirect brainstem injury. CONCLUSIONS: Many posterior fossa cysts can be treated effectively and safely via a posterior fossa approach with the aid of a malleable endoscope. Direct visualization facilitates intracavitary catheter placement and orientation of the catheter in the long axis of the cyst, thereby decreasing the risk of injury to surrounding structures.
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ranking = 11.96900924887
keywords = ventricle
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6/92. Intracerebral cystic meningioma--case report.

    A 46-year-old female presented with persistent bifrontal headache. Computed tomography revealed a large cystic tumor in the right temporoparietal area, which included a solid component. The tumor had no attachment to the dura. There was no peritumoral edema or mass effect usually found around cystic meningiomas. The solid component was totally removed. Histological examination indicated that the tumor was a fibrous meningioma. Intracerebral meningioma with a large cystic component without dural attachment should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic cerebral tumors.
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ranking = 6
keywords = cerebral
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7/92. Intracystic hemorrhage of the middle fossa arachnoid cyst and subdural hematoma caused by ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm.

    We report a case of a cerebral aneurysm arising from the bifurcation of the left middle cerebral artery that ruptured into a left middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst, associated with acute subdural hematoma. We discuss the relationships of aneurysm, arachnoid cyst, and subdural hematoma.
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ranking = 6
keywords = cerebral
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8/92. diagnosis of arachnoid cysts on prenatal ultrasound.

    The aetiology and physiology of congenital arachnoid cysts are a source of controversy. We report a case where fetal cerebral ultrasonography shows an extraventricular sonolucent cystic formation after 20 weeks of pregnancy. ultrasonography provides its topographic relations with adjacent brain structures and is also used to diagnose possible associated malformations. MRI confirms the ultrasonographic findings by investigating cerebral gyri. The rest of the examination involves detection of extracerebral anomalies and a karyotype study. Other differential diagnoses will be considered as a function of the embryological origin and topography of arachnoid cysts. The outcome of these arachnoid cysts depends on the age at the time of diagnosis, their size and their topography. The problem is that hydrocephalus, due to compression of the cerebrospinal fluid drainage pathways, may develop. Treatment, if necessary, is nearly always surgical.
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ranking = 3
keywords = cerebral
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9/92. dandy-walker syndrome successfully treated with cystoperitoneal shunting--case report.

    A neonate presented with dandy-walker syndrome manifesting as a large posterior cranial fossa cyst, aplasia of the lower cerebellar vermis, and elevation of the confluence of the sinuses but without hydrocephalus. A cystoperitoneal shunt was placed at one month after birth. The cyst diminished in size, and marked development of the cerebellar hemispheres and descent of the confluence of sinuses were observed, but not vermis development. The primary pathology of dandy-walker syndrome is posterior cranial fossa cyst formation due to passage obstruction in the fourth ventricle exit area and aplasia of the lower cerebellar vermis. The first choice of treatment in patients with dandy-walker syndrome in whom the cerebral aqueduct is open is cystoperitoneal shunt surgery, regardless of the presence or absence of hydrocephalus.
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ranking = 12.96900924887
keywords = ventricle, cerebral
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10/92. Retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst with syringomyelia: a case report.

    association of syringomyelia with retrocerebellar arachnoid cysts is rare. A case of 14 year old female is being reported, who presented with hydrocephalus caused by a large midline retrocerebellar infravermal arachnoid cyst leading to obstruction of the outlet foramina of the fourth ventricle. There was associated syringomyelia. The pathogenesis of syringomyelia is discussed. The need to evaluate cervical spinal cord by taking T1 weighted sagittal sections in all the patients of large posterior fossa mass lesions causing obstruction to the outlet foramina of the fourth ventricle has been stressed, in order to detect associated syringomyelia.
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ranking = 23.938018497739
keywords = ventricle
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