Cases reported "Arm Injuries"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/135. The use of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of triceps tendon ruptures.

    Triceps tendon rupture is a rare injury. Three cases are presented with a brief review of the literature. Additionally, the use of magnetic resonance imaging to facilitate the diagnosis of triceps tendon rupture is described for the first time in the English literature. Each of the three patients has done well with a Mersilene tape repair of the triceps tendon.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/135. Burn due to misuse of an acetylene gas burner: a case report.

    A rare case of deep penetrating burn injury caused by misuse of a high-pressure acetylene burner is reported. A 35 year old man was admitted with second and third degree burns involving the right arm cubital area and a subcutaneous burn on his right arm caused by a high-pressure acetylene gas flame. Early surgical debridement and secondary skin grafting using a preserved subcutaneous vascular network skin graft (PSVNSG) proved effective in this patient. skin contracture was prevented and function was recovered. The basis of PSVNSG is that the vascular system existing in the graft is used as a permanent vascular system without degeneration. This case shows that, in this kind of burn injury, subcutaneous tissue damage should be suspected and that it is important to perform surgical debridement early after admission.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/135. Transcranial doppler detection of fat emboli.

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The fat embolism syndrome (FES) is characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of pulmonary and neurological symptoms as well as skin and mucosal petechiae in the setting of long-bone fractures or their surgical repair. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood, and effective treatments are lacking. We present 5 patients with long-bone fractures in whom in vivo microembolism was detected by transcranial Doppler. methods: Five patients with long-bone fractures were monitored with transcranial Doppler for microembolic signals (MESs) after trauma. Two patients also had intraoperative monitoring. A TC-2020 instrument equipped with MES detection software was used. Detected signals were saved for subsequent review. Selected signals satisfied criteria defined previously and were categorized as large or small. RESULTS: Cerebral microembolism was detected in all 5 patients and was transient, resolving within 4 days of injury. Intraoperative monitoring revealed an increase in MESs during intramedullary nail insertion. The characteristics of MESs after injury varied among patients, with large signals being more frequent in the only patient with a patent foramen ovale. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral microembolism after long-bone fractures can be detected in vivo and monitored over time. These findings may have potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/135. Primary reconstruction of traumatic bony defects using allografts.

    We retrospectively reviewed 207 patients suffering from traumatic bone defect who had been treated at our institution between 1973 and 1993. Three types of traumatic bone defects were identified: I, minor; II, major cortical; III, major articular. Each type was further subdivided into: A, open injury; B, closed injury. The proposed treatment modality of each type was included within each classification. Types II and III posed the greatest difficulties in management. However, massive bone allografts can be successfully used in these situations, even in the early phases of treatment, but only given specific prerequisites.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/135. The shaking trauma in infants - kinetic chains.

    The findings in three children who died as a consequence of shaking and those in another child who survived are presented. In the three fatal cases, a combination of anatomical lesions were identified at autopsy which appear to indicate the sites where kinetic energy related to the shaking episodes had been applied thus enabling the sequence of events resulting in the fatal head injury to be elucidated. Such patterns of injuries involved the upper limb, the shoulder, the brachial nerve plexus and the muscles close to the scapula; hemorrhages were present at the insertions of the sternocleidomastoid muscles due to hyperextension trauma (the so-called periosteal sign) and in the transition zone between the cervical and thoracic spine and extradural hematomas. Characteristic lesions due to traction were also found in the legs. All three children with lethal shaking trauma died from a subdural hematoma only a few hours after the event. The surviving child had persistant hypoxic damage of the brain following on massive cerebral edema. All the children showed a discrepancy between the lack of identifiable external lesions and severe internal ones.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/135. The voluntary control of motor imagery. Imagined movements in individuals with feigned motor impairment and conversion disorder.

    The ability to volitionally control motor imagery was investigated by comparing the chronometry of real and imagined movements in a patient (AB) with conversion disorder who presented with paralysis of the left arm and hand and in a patient (MM) with an actual injury to the left arm. Control experiments investigated voluntary control of motor imagery in a group of healthy individuals who feigned a motor impairment with one limb and in one group who were instructed to move carefully and slowly. The visually guided pointing task was used to investigate the speed for accuracy trade-offs that occur as target size is varied for both real and imagined performance. In the healthy individuals, the speed for accuracy trade-off for both real and imagined performance on the motor task conformed to Fitts' law provided both the speed and accuracy of movements was emphasised. In MM, real and imagined performance was also within normal limits despite considerable pain and discomfort. In AB and in subjects feigning a motor impairment, motor task performance with the affected limb was slow and did not conform to Fitts' law. However, although imagined performance with the affected limb was generally slower than with the unaffected limb, it did conform to Fitts' law. These results suggest subjects cannot anticipate the effects of an actual limb injury. Furthermore, while they are able to control the general duration of imagined movements they have little voluntary control over their relative timing.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/135. Fishing penetration injuries.

    BACKGROUND: Fishing involves millions of people throughout the world and is considered a pleasant and harmless sport. However, many kinds of injury can occur. Penetrating injuries to the extremities by fishing equipment such as hooks and harpoons, and even by scales, or infection from penetration of scales etc are relatively common although hardly ever reported in the literature. methods: Illustrative cases of penetrating fishing injuries are presented and discussed, with suggestions for the recommended management of these types of injury. RESULTS: Most of these objects are designed to catch and hold resisting fish, so are usually sharp and narrow in the front and wider in the rear with or without spurs. Because of their very irregular shape, simple extraction by pulling is not recommended, because further damage may occur. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the appropriate imaging modalities, a full knowledge of the contours of the object, and careful preplanning of the method of treatment are very important.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/135. The platform transfer splint: 2 case reports of a mobility aide for persons with arm injuries or conditions.

    Limited or impaired mobility is a major obstacle to maximizing length of stay efficiency for inpatient rehabilitation. Trauma patients and others with multiple limb impairments present a mobility challenge to all rehabilitation centers. Of particular concern are patients with forearm fractures who are nonambulatory. With shorter inpatient stays, patients are being discharged home or to other settings with continued weight-bearing restrictions. These patients put great demands on their caregivers as a result of their limited mobility. The Platform Transfer Splint (PTS) has been developed to overcome limitations seen in this patient population. It is an upper extremity splint that allows weight bearing through the humerus for patients with impairments of the forearm or hand. With use of the PTS, patients can become independent in transfers and wheelchair propulsion. Two case studies are presented to show the impact of the PTS on patient mobility and discharge disposition. Fabrication of the splint is also discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.36205057099562
keywords = forearm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/135. Vitamin deficiency in a toddler reluctant to use her arm.

    Children frequently present to accident and emergency departments with limb pain, usually following trauma. An unusual cause of atraumatic limb pain in a toddler is described in this report. rickets should be added to the differential diagnosis of atraumatic limb pain in this age group. The possibility of acute bony injury (following unwitnessed trauma) not apparent on X-ray needs to be considered in this case. Suspicion of rickets, based on clinical features and radiographic findings, can be confirmed by biochemical assays.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/135. Complex regional pain syndrome (type I) after electrical injury: a case report of treatment with continuous epidural block.

    A 26-year-old man presented with severe complex regional pain syndrome type I of the affected limb after a work-related electrical injury. He suffered causalgia-like pain with no electrodiagnostic evidence of nerve injury. Early steroid and analgesic regimens did not adequately relieve these symptoms. His symptoms were temporarily relieved several times with stellate ganglion blocks. The patient underwent a cervical epidural block with a local anesthetic as well as a narcotic agonist over a 4-day period, which resulted in prompt, remarkable pain relief. Vocational rehabilitation was instituted as the pain subsided.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Arm Injuries'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.